Morris Wynn

( - circa 1671)
     Morris Wynn was born in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard.
     His will was proved in 1671 at London.
     Morris died circa 1671. He left no issue.

Sir Owen Wynn (3rd Baronet)

(circa 1592 - 1660)
     Sir Owen Wynn (3rd Baronet) was born circa 1592 in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard.
     He was educated at Westminster , Eton , and St John's, Cambridge . He was apprenticed to a merchant of the Staple in 1608 , but eventually came under the patronage of lord-keeper (later archbishop ) John Williams, whose niece, Grace , he married. in 1462 . Like his elder brother, he took no active part in the Civil Wars . Although threatened with sequestration in 1656 , he appears to have escaped and as sheriff of Caernarvonshire in 1653 , he proclaimed Cromwell as Protector . He was high sheriff of Denbighshire in 1656 . He was interested in alchemy, chemistry, and metallurgy.
     Succeeded his brother to the Baronetcy 1649. He married Grace, daughter of Hugh Williams, of Werg co. Carnarvon. Her will proved 1680.
     Owen died in 1660.

Child of Sir Owen Wynn (3rd Baronet)

Richard Wynn

(say 1620 - before 1706)
     He married Catherine, daughter of Richard Viscount Bulkeley, she was buried 5 Sep 1706 aged 69. [Salusbury ms]

. Richard Wynn was born say 1620. He was the son of William Wynn.
     Richard Wynn lived at Garthgynan, Branas, Llandrillo-yn-Edeirnion, Merioneth, Wales, 3 June 1639.
     Richard died before 1706 in Branas, Llandrillo-yn-Edeirnion, Merioneth, Wales.

Richard Wynn

     Richard died in infancy. He was the son of William Wynn.

Archdeacon Richard Wynn

( - 9 September 1617)
     Archdeacon Richard Wynn was born in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Morris Wynne and Jane Bulkeley. Richard was Archdeacon at Bangor, Caernavonshire, Wales.
     Richard died on 9 September 1617 in Wales.

Sir Richard Wynn (2nd Baronet)

(circa 1588 - 19 July 1649)
     Sir Richard Wynn (2nd Baronet) was born circa 1588 in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard.
     He was one of the Gentlemen of the Privy Chamber to Charles, Prince of Wales, whom he accompanied in his journey to Spain, being, after that prince's accession to the throne, Treasurer to the Queen Consort Henrietta. He was M.P. for Carnarvonshire 1619; for Ilchester 1621-22, 1624-25 and 1625; for Andover April to May 1640, and for Liverpool Nov 1640 to his death. He succeeded to the Baronetcy (presumably) 1 March 1626.

.
     His will was proved in 1649.
     Richard died on 19 July 1649 in England. He was aged 61 and had married in 1618 Anne, daughterand coheiress of Sir Francis Darcy , but was childless. The baronetcy and estates fell to his brother Sir Owen on his death aged 61. He was buried in Wimbledon, Surrey.

Sir Richard Wynn (4 or 5 Bart)

(circa 1625 - 1674)
     Sir Richard Wynn (4 or 5 Bart) was born circa 1625 in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir Owen Wynn (3rd Baronet).
     He married Sarah, daughter of Sir Thomas Myddleton, Bt of Chirk Castle, and had an only daughter Mary Wynn who married 30 July 1678, 13th Baron Willougby de Eresby and Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven. On the death of Sir Richard he was succeeded in the baronetcy by his cousin Sir John Wynn.
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     He succeeded as 4th baronet in 1660 . He was high sheriff of Caernarvonshire , 1657-8 , Member of Parliament for Caernarvonshire , 1647-53 and 1661-75 , and was associated with the municipal government of Denbigh . In 1659 he appears to have been implicated in the royalist insurrection arranged by Sir George Booth and Sir Thomas Myddelton (whose daughter, Sarah , he had m. in 1654 ) and was for a while imprisoned at Caernarvon . On his death in 1674 his estate passed to his daughter Mary (1661 - 1689 ), who married in 1678 , Robert Bertie , baron Willoughby de Eresby later marquis of Lindsey and duke of Ancaster , in whose family Gwydir remained until 1895 . The baronetcy passed to John Wynn of Watstay ( 1628 - 1719 ), only son of Henry Wynn , tenth son of the first baronet , and was extinguished by his death.
     Richard died in 1674.

Robert Wynn

(circa 1603 - )
     Robert Wynn was born circa 1603 in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the fourth son.. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard.

Roger Wynn

     Roger Wynn was born in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard.

Sidney Wynn (Thelwall)

( - 15 June 1683)
     Sidney Wynn (Thelwall) was the daughter of William Wynn.
     Sidney died on 15 June 1683.

Children of Sidney Wynn (Thelwall)

Thomas Wynn

     Thomas Wynn was born in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard.

Thomas Wynn

(1 February 1635/36 - )
     Thomas Wynn was born on 1 February 1635/36 in King's Norton, Worcestershire. He was the son of William Wynn.

William Wynn

(circa 1604 - 24 December 1654)
     6th son. Prothonotary of Wales, acquired Branas in Edeirnion, co. Merioneth, by purchase from Humphrey Branas. He married Jane, daughter & heiress of Thomas Lloyd, of Gwern-y-Brechtyn and had issue.
Salusbury ms gives ob.24 Oct 1664. Prothonotary of North Wales. Of Garthgynan. Marriage convenants dated 20 March 1628.
     William was Prothonotary in Wales. He was born circa 1604 in Gwydir, Llanwrst, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He was the son of Sir John Wynn (1st Bart) and Sidney Gerrard. William was present at Mary Wynn's christening on 3 June 1639 in King's Norton, Worcestershire.
     William died on 24 December 1654.

Children of William Wynn

William Wynn

     William died in infancy. He was the son of William Wynn.

Cadwallader Wynne

(before 1634 - after 1669)
     Cadwallader Wynne was born before 1634. He was the son of Lewis Gwynne ap Cadwallader and Sidney Wynne.
     Cadwallader died after 1669. He was mentioned in his brother's will of 1699.

Catherine Wynne

(circa 1655 - before 1764)
     Catherine Wynne was born circa 1655 in Lurganboy, Leitrim, Ireland. She was the daughter of Col Owen Wynne (I) and Catherine Hamilton.
     Catherine Wynne married Major John Dunbar, son of Major John Dunbar and Mary Harman, before 1670. She was a 9th cousin of her husband, both being descended from Robert II, but also a 2nd cousin once removed, her mother Catherine Hamilton, being his 2nd cousin via the Harman family..
     Catherine Wynne and Catherine Hamilton, Brig-Gen James Wynne, Lewis Wynne, Gen Owen Wynne (II), Lucy Wynne and John Wynne were beneficiaries in Col Owen Wynne (I)'s will dated 3 June 1670 in Lurganboy, Leitrim.
     Catherine Wynne was party to a land transaction in September 1712 in Ballinacarrig or Staplestown, Carlow. A 1721 document states that the Earl of Thomond by a deed of free farm dated the 26th September 1712 did grant release and confirm unto Katherine Dunbar, widow, mother of the said John Dunbar, all those the lands of Quinagh with these ... epirnation?? 370 acres more or less, in the parish of Ballinacarrig Barony of Catherlogh, County of Catherlogh To hold unto the said Katherine Dunbar her heirs and assigns for ever all and under the yearly free farm rent of forty six pounds.... She was widowed before 26 September 1712 on the death of her husband Major John Dunbar.
     Catherine Wynne was party to a land transaction on 30 March 1721 in Dublin. Memorial of deeds of lease and release the last day of March and the first day of April 1721 between John Dunbar of the city of Dublin, esq. of the one part and Frances Cocksedge of Dublin, esq. of the other part the said release reciting that the ... Earl of Thomond by a deed of fee farm dated the 26th September 1712 did grant release and confirm unto Katherine Dunbar, widow, mother of the said John Dunbar, all those the lands of Quinagh with these ... epirnation?? 370 acres more or less, in the parish of Ballinacarrig Barony of Catherlogh, County of Catherlogh To hold unto the said Katherine Dunbar her heirs and assigns for ever all and under the yearly free farm rent of forty six pounds with several ... That the right and ... the said John Dunbar by which said release the said John Dunbar ... in consideration of five hundred pounds to him paid by the said Francis Cocksedge did grant release and confirm ... Francis Cocksedge all that the afsd ... and and the bog with the appurtenances to hold ... said Francis Cocksedge his heirs and assigns forever and under the said free farm rent duly and covenents in the said free farme deed ... which said deed of release is contained ... whereby ... declared to be void on payment of the said sum of five hundred pounds and intrest in manner herein mentioned which ... of lease and release are witnessed by James Ramsey of Dublin, peruke maker John Coyle servt to the said John Dunbar and Henry Buckley of the same city of Dublin, notary public. Jo Dunbar signed and sealed in the presence of .. John Coyle. John .... The above named Henry Buckley maketh oath ... and release for which he .. duly perfected by the above named John Dunbar ... said John Dunbar duly signed and sealed ... said ... he This Dep ... Henry Buckley. Registered the ... 4 o'clock in the afternoon..
     Catherine Wynne was mentioned in the will of Major John Dunbar dated 27 May 1724.
     Catherine Wynne was mentioned in a deed dated July 1744 in Carlow, Carlow. Mrs Catherine Dunbar was in possession of lands in Catherlough town and mentioned as occupier in lease and releases..
     Catherine died before 1764 in Ballycarney, Ballinacarrig or Staplestown, Carlow, Ireland. In 1764 her grandson was able to inherit her husband's estate, probably on her death..

Children of Catherine Wynne and Major John Dunbar

Catherine Wynne

     Catherine Wynne was born in Wales. He was the son of Meredith ap Ieuan Wyn and Alice William ap Griffith.

Catherine Wynne (Wynne)

(say 1627 - )
     Catherine Wynne (Wynne) was born say 1627 in Wales. She was the daughter of Lewis Gwynne ap Cadwallader and Sidney Wynne.
     Catherine Wynne (Wynne) married Edward Wynne, son of Richard Wynne, in Wales. She married her cousin Edward Wynne of Nantymerchied, son of Richard Wynne of Maesmochnant.

Catherine Wen Wynne

     Catherine Wen Wynne was born in Wales. She was the daughter of Meredith ap Ieuan Wyn and Alice William ap Griffith.

Dorothy Wynne

(after 1688 - after 1707)
     Dorothy Wynne was born after 1688. She was the daughter of Brig-Gen James Wynne and Catherine Bingham.
     Dorothy died after 1707.

Dorothy Wynne (Cuffe)

(after 3 June 1670 - )
     She was presumably the unborn child mentioned in her father's will 1670. Burke's Irish family records p.1226 calls her Dorothy who married Gerald Cuffe of Elm Hall co. Mayo and had issue. See Burke's Dormant & Extinct Peerages re Tyrawley, B.
. Dorothy Wynne (Cuffe) was born after 3 June 1670 in Ireland. She was the daughter of Col Owen Wynne (I) and Catherine Hamilton.

Edward Wynne

     Edward Wynne lived at Ystrad, Glamorganshire?, Wales. He was born in Wales. He was the ancestor of the Wynns of Llwyn.. He was the son of Morris Wynne and Catherine ferch Tudor ap Robert Vychan.

Edward Wynne

     Edward Wynne was born in Nantymerchied, Montgomeryshire. He was the son of Richard Wynne.
     Edward Wynne married Catherine Wynne (Wynne), daughter of Lewis Gwynne ap Cadwallader and Sidney Wynne, in Wales. She married her cousin Edward Wynne of Nantymerchied, son of Richard Wynne of Maesmochnant.

Edward Wynne

(circa 1730 - )
     Trinity College Dublin - Pensioner (Mr Sheil) Dec 5, 1747 aged 15, son of John
clericus; b. Dublin. . Possibly to young to be
father and son?

. Edward Wynne was born circa 1730 in Dublin, Ireland. He was the son of John Wynne.

Elizabeth Wynne

     Elizabeth Wynne was the daughter of Lt Owen Wynne.

Folliott Wynne

( - circa 1784)
     Folliott Wynne was the son of Lt John Wynne.
     Folliott died circa 1784 in Ireland.

Hannah Wynne

(circa 1722 - 1798)
     Hannah Wynne was born circa 1722 in Ireland. She was the daughter of Captain Owen Wynne III? and Catherine ffolliott.
     Hannah Wynne married William Ormsby in 1743.
     Hannah died in 1798 in Sligo?, Ireland.

Child of Hannah Wynne and William Ormsby

James Wynne

(before 1686 - )
     James Wynne was born before 1686. He was the son of Brig-Gen James Wynne and Catherine Bingham.
     Guthrie-Jones writes: Brigadier-General James Wynne, the subject of chapter four, had a son, who was also named James. Where necessary for the sake of clarity, the latter is referred to as James the younger.
     In the Netherlands, James the younger, served as a captain in his uncle Owen's 23rd Regiment of Foot. We have one glimpse of him in 1708 from a letter in the Belfast records written by a fellow officer, Captain Henry Crawford. When the allies were besieging Lille they maintained a line of supply to that fortress from Ostend, where supplies brought from England were landed. The town Of Lessigne lay on this route; it had a castle which it was important for the allies to hold against flank attacks by the French. The French had flooded the land to the south-west of Ostend so that much of the supplies for the besiegers of Lille had to be ferried by boat. On the 14th October, 1708, James Wynne the younger, in command of one hundred Grenadiers, arrived with Captain Crawford at Lessigne. The castle, which lay at a short distance from the town, was under the command of a Col. Caulfied. Caulfield was under attack by the French, and was determined to surrender. As Wynne and his troops approached the castle they were met by musket fire from the French who had occupied a nearby graveyard. Caulfield ordered James not the return the fire. The colonel, with such troops as he had, then marched out of the castle and surrendered as prisoners of war. It is not clear from Capt. Crawford's letter whether he, James and the Grenadiers succeeded in avoiding capture or not.
James the younger was the heir to the family lands in County Leitrim, for he was the son of Owen I's eldest son. One would have thought that his inheritance on his father's death in 1695 was substantial, for his father had not only inherited Owen I's property but had also sold the Welsh estate. And yet James the younger was penniless, for his father died insolvent. On the 8th November, 1707, twelve years after his father's death, James signed a document which read as follows:
     'Know all men by these presents that I, James Wynne of Lurganboy, son and heir of James Wynne of Lurganboy, deceased, having maturely considered the many and great debts contracted by my father in his life time and which were left unpaid at the time of his death as also the insufficiency of the estate and assets by him left for paying the said debts and for maintaining of me and my sisters Dorothy, Sidney, Jane and Mary Wynne. I gratefully acknowledge the kindness of my uncle Owen Wynne of Ballinow (Ballina?) in the County of Mayo, Esquire, in taking upon him the administration of my said father's goods and chattels and the guardianship of me during my minority and being fully satisfied that the sum of money by him expended paying my said fathers' debts, in maintaining of me and my sisters and portioning of my sister Dorothy, do far exceed the sum of money he had or might have received as executor or guardian as aforesaid. Do therefore hereby exonerate, discharge, release and forever quit claim unto the said Owen Wynne, his heirs executors and administrators, of and from all manner of accounts and demands whatsoever from the beginning of the world unto the date of these presents'.
     The occasion when this document was signed by James was attended by much solemnity. Five witnesses added their signatures to it. These were John Dunbar, brother-in-law of James senior, Owen Wynne III; John Wynne, who was probably James senior's brother, and John Miller and Francis Cocksedge, relations of the Wynne family by marriage.
The document is drafted in very wide terms. Its effect was to declare that nothing was due to James from his father's estate because of his father's insolvency. The money raised by the sale of the Welsh estate had been spent, while the lands in County Leitrim must have been heavily encumbered. Owen II, who no doubt was making the decisions, could, after paying the debts, have left his nephew James as owner of the land and could have made him his own heir. But Owen II decided that his heir should be, not James, but Owen III, the son of his younger brother Lewis Wynne. In that same year, 1707, James the younger settled on Owen Wynne III the Lurganboy estate including the bishop's leases, while on his death in 1737 Owen II left his property, in particular the newly acquired Hazelwood estate, to Owen III. James and his four sisters simply fade out of the family history.
     Owen II may well have thought that all the family property should be concentrated in the hands of one owner rather than that the Leitrim lands should go to one member of the family and the Sligo lands to another. But we do not know why James, who had the strongest claim through being the representative of the senior line, should be passed over. Note the date of Capt. Crawford's letter quoted above. It is one year after the date of James' declaration and the settlement of his estates on Owen III. The fact that in 1708 James the younger was a captain on active service does not suggest that he was unfit to inherit the estates nor that he was incapable of begetting a male heir who would carry on the senior line
.
     James the younger was penniless, for his father died insolvent. On 8 November 1707, twelve years after his father's death, James signed a document which reads as follows:
"Know all men by these presents that I, James Wynne of Lurganboy son and heir of James Wynne of Lurganboy, deceased, have maturely considered the many and great debts contracted by my father in his life time and which were left unpaid at the time of his death as also the insufficiency of the estate and assets by him left for paying the said debts and for maintaining of me and my sisters, Dorothy, Sidney, Jane and Mary Wynne. I gratefully acknowledge the kindness of my uncle Owen Wynne of Ballinow [sic - Ballynew?]] in the county of Mayo, Esquire, in taking upon him the administration of my said father's goods and chattels and the guardianship of me during my minority and being fully satisfied that the sum of money by him expended paying my said fathers' debts, in maintaining of me and my sisters and portioning my sister, Dorothy, do far exceed the sum of money he had or might have received as executor or guardian as aforesaid. Do therefore hereby exonerate, discharge, release and forever quit claim unto the said Owen Wynne, his heirs, executors and administrators, of and from all manner of accounts and demands whatsoever from the beginning of the world unto the date of these presents."
The occasion when this document was signed by James was attended by much solemnity. Five witnesses added their signatures to it. These were John Dunbar, brother-in-law of James Senior; Owen Wynne III; John Wynne, who was probably James Senior's brother; and John Miller and Francis Cocksedge, relations of the Wynne family by marriage.
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James Wynne

(circa 1715 - 1748)
     James Wynne was born circa 1715 in Ireland. He was the son of Captain Owen Wynne III? and Catherine ffolliott.
     James died in 1748 in Hazlewood, Calry, Sligo, Ireland. He died without issue, his heir was his brother Owen. He was sometime MP for co.Sligo. He married in 1738 Susanna, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Arthur Shaen, 2nd Bart, of Kilmore, co. Roscommon. She married secondly in 1750 Capt Henry Boyle Carter of Castle Martin, co. Kildare. He may be the subject of the 1749 will of James Wynne, of Dublin.

Brig-Gen James Wynne

(after 1651 - circa September 1695)
     Brig-Gen James Wynne was born after 1651 in Lurganboy, Leitrim, Ireland. He was the son of Col Owen Wynne (I) and Catherine Hamilton.
     In Col Owen Wynne (I)'s will dated 3 June 1670 in Lurganboy, Leitrim, Brig-Gen James Wynne was named as heir; Owen Wynne of Lurganboy co. Leitrim (shield) 3 June 1670: mentions his wife Catherine (with child), younger children Lewis, Owen, Catherine, Lucy & John. Son & heir James. Bro-in-law Edw Wynne, brother Cadwallader Wynne, niece Dorothy Cocksedge, alias Roberts.
     Brig-Gen James Wynne married Catherine Bingham, daughter of John Bingham.
     1681. Original and 'Copy [of] James Wynne's deed of sale of the family estate in Wales, called Bala in Merrionethshire, for £1,400 ...'to Simon Lloyd of Rhiwaedog, whose own estate was located in the same area.
     James was High Sheriff of the county in Leitrim, Ireland, in 1686.
     He served as an officer in the British Army from 1688. Brigadier-General Wynne raised the 5th Royal Irish Dragoons (Wynne's Enniskilleners 1688-1695). In the revolution of 1688: Col. Wynne's Regiment was a principal component of Sir Frederick Hamilton's troopers 1691 [Wood-Martin, W G. History of Sligo v.2. Dublin, 1889].
The Regiment was taken over by Col. Ross in 1695. Owen Wynne became the Colonel of the Regiment (Royal Dragoons) 1732-1737,
See http://www.proni.gov.uk/introduction__wynne_papers_d429.pdf & http://www.royalirishlancers.co.uk/history.htm for more information.
     He served as an officer in the Royal Irish Dragoons from 1689. He was promoted to Brigadier Gernal in Oct 1695 while serving in Ghent.      
Brig-Gen James Wynne was the Member of Parliament in 1692 for Leitrim.
     
     Guthrie-Jones wrote: James Wynne of Lurganboy, the eldest son of Owen Wynne 1, succeeded his father in 1670. He held the office of High Sheriff for County Leitrim in 1686 and was Member of Parliament for the same county in 1692. He married Catherine, daughter of John Bingham of Castlebar. John Bingham had married James Wynne's mother as her third husband, his daughter Catherine, whom James married, being a child of Bingham's by a previous marriage. The family of Bingham had been prominent in the Elizabethan wars in Ireland and in particular had contested the possession of Sligo castle with the forces of Hugh Roe O'Neill.
In 1681 James Wynne sold the Bala estate to his neighbour Simon Lloyd of Rhiwaedog for £1,400. The purchaser's grandson, the Rev. Simon Lloyd (1756-1836) rebuilt the old Play-yn-dre. After being altered in several respects in the 19th century, the house was converted into a hotel in 1990. The hotel bears the name of Plas-yri-dre and displays as its sign the arms of the Wynne family.
When William landed at Torbay in November, 1688, King James fled to France and did not land in Ireland until March of the following year. In these early days, before the arrival of troops from England under the Duke of Schomberg in the autumn of 1689 and under William in June 1690, the war in Ireland had already begun. All Ireland, with the exception of the Protestant enclaves of Derry and Enniskillen, both of which harboured Protestant refugees from the surrounding counties, was in Jacobite hands. The starting point of the conflict may be found in December, 1688, when thirteen apprentice boys closed the gates of Derry against a Jacobite army. The siege of Derry had begun.
James Wynne left Ireland for England to enlist in William's army. We shall see in chapter seven that this is what his brother Lewis did, and perhaps they went together. According to Dalton's English Army Lists, James was appointed a captain in Col. Cunningham's regiment Of foot. In April, 1689 this regiment, together with a second regiment under a Col. Richards, sailed from Liverpool in ten troopships destined for the relief of the besieged Derry. The voyage of six days was appalling. The men were unable to lie down and sleep, the biscuit, which had been in store in Chester castle since Monmouth's rebellion four years earlier, was rotten and mouldy and "the beer stank so that the men chose rather to drink salt water or their own urine". Many died. On arrival at Lough Foyle these two regiments were turned back by Lundy, the governor of Derry, on the ground that there were not enough provisions to feed them. Opinions differ as to whether Lundy was a traitor bent on handing over the city to James or whether he was merely massively incompetent. He escaped from Derry in disguise during the siege and his effigy is still burnt annually in the city.     
In the event the two regiments sailed back to England, where Cunningham and Richards were arrested and dismissed from the service.
At the end of May Major-General Kirke sailed from England with four regiments for the relief of Derry. Two of these regiments were those which had been engaged in the abortive attempt at relief under Cunningham and Richards. Cunningham's own regiment was now commanded by Col. Stewart and James Wynne was serving in it in his previous rank of captain. On arrival at Lough Foyle, Kirke inexcusably delayed relieving the city, believing that without a serious loss of ships he could not break the boom built by the Jacobites across the river. When eventually Kirke broke through the boom the siege had lasted for over three months and those who were left in the city were in the closing stages of starvation.
While the siege lasted the Enniskilleners constantly harried James' line of supply between Dublin and Derry. The Enniskilleners had 17 troops of horse, 30 foot companies and a few troops of dragoons, but they suffered from a lack of adequate arms. They sent two representatives to Kirke to ask for help. The two went by sea from Ballyshannon to the island of Inch in Lough Swilly where they met Kirke. One of the Enniskilleners was Andrew Hamilton who in 1690 published his 'True Relation of the Action of the Enniskillen Men' ' In this book Hamilton describes how Kirke gave them firearms, powder and some small cannons. He continues:     
"The Major-General told us that he could spare none of his private men, but gave us some very good officers, viz Colonel William Wolseley to be our commander-in-chief and Colonel William Berry to be lieutenant-colonel of our horse, Captain Charles Stone to be major of our horse and Captain James Wynne, a gentleman from Ireland, but then a captain in Colonel Stewart's regiment, to be colonel of our dragoons. And for our three regiments of foot, Gustavus Hamilton, governor of Enniskillen, was made eldest colonel, and Lt-Colonel Lloyd and Major Tiffan were the other two colonels".
This little group of officers, namely Wolseley, Berry, Stone and Wynne, together with the two emissaries from Enniskillen, sailed from Inch to Ballyshannon while the arms followed in other vessels. From Ballyshannon the group travelled to Belleek and then by boat up Lower Lough Erne to Enniskillen. There the whole garrison turned out and men, women and children crowded round them. On the same day Kirke's warship, the Mountjoy, broke the boom and raised the siege of Derry.
James Wynne, now promoted colonel, did not have long to wait for action. A Jacobite army under Justin McCarty, Lord Mountcashel, an able and honourable man, was advancing on Enniskillen from the east. Its forward troops were battering at Crom Castle, an outpost of Enniskilleners at the east end of Upper Lough Eme. Wolseley at once sent Berry with a few hundred dragoons, horse and foot to the relief of Crom. This Berry succeeded in doing in a brisk skirmish. Wolseley followed from Enniskillen with the main body of troops. He learnt that Mountcashel with an army numbering 4,000 had reached Newtownbutler, a few miles from Crom Castle. Although Wolseley had about half that number of men, he decided to advance to battle. To the west and east of Newtownbutler lay a bog bisected by causeways running into the town. Wolseley's army advanced on the town from the west. Berry, at the head of the horse, advanced along the causeway, while Tiffan with the foot slogged through the bog on the right, and Lloyd did the same on the left. Wynne's dragoons, divided into two parts, advanced with Tiffan and Lloyd on foot. Mountcashel retreated through the town and set it on fire. About a mile on the other side of the town he took up a well-chosen site on a hill. Wolseley's forces adopted the same formation as before. This time, however, his cavalry could not advance along the causeway because of fire from Mountcashel's cannon. Wolseley's foot, with Wynne's dismounted dragoons, plodded through the bog and engaged the enemy. The Irish infantry fought bravely until they saw their cavalry retreating. This retreat may have been due to a misunderstanding of Schomberg's orders as between 'right face', meaning ride to the assistance of the right wing, and 'right about face', meaning retreat. The result was that the Jacobite foot began to run, the cannons were captured, and the Enniskillen horse thundered over the causeway. Macaulay describes the ensuing scene:
The conquerors now gave loose to that ferocity which has seldom failed to disgrace the civil wars of Ireland. The butchery was terrible. Near 1,500 of the vanquished were put to the sword. About 500 more, in ignorance of the country, took a road which led to Lough Erne. The lake was before them: the enemy behind: they plunged into the waters and perished there'.     
It is important to bear in mind that the Battle of Newtownbutler was fought before the arrival of Williamite troops from England. Schomberg, William's commander-in-Chief, landed in Ireland about two months after the battle, while William himself did not come until the middle of the following year. When Newtownbutler was fought the Battle of the Boyne lay nearly twelve months ahead.
When Schomberg took command in Ireland he sent a number of written orders to Wynne relating to the deployment of Wynne's dragoons. These orders are with the Wynne papers in the PRO in Belfast. In particular one troop of horse was to be stationed at Ballyshannon to patrol the road to Sligo, then held by the Jacobites. On Schomberg's arrival the bulk of the Enniskilleners joined him at Dund lk. One of Schomberg's entourage noted in his diary:
"The arrival of the so-called Enniskilling dragoons increased the number of the army but not its mutual harmony. The sight of their thin little nags and the wretched dress of their riders, half-naked with sabres and pistols hanging from their belts, looked like a horde of Tartars. These brave people offered themselves as volunteers for the advance guard. They could not bear to be given orders, but kept saying that they were no good if they were not allowed to act as they pleased. This was such a contrast to Schomberg's strict discipline that he decided to make an exception and let them go according to their own genius".
Wynne's dragoons, however, appear to have joined Schomberg's army only shortly before the Battle of the Boyne and after they had been deployed widely as patrols. Gideon Bonnivert, a Frenchman serving in Schomberg's army, described their arrival:
"We encamped in very rugged ground (near Dundalk). The Enniskillen Dragoons came there to us. They are but middle sized men, but they are nevertheless brave fellows. I have seen them like mastiff dogs run against bullets".
The Enniskilleners fought at the Battle of the Boyne on the 1st July, 1690 (Old Style). Only a brief account of the battle, in so far as it concerned the Enniskilleners, need be given. The first Williamite troops to wade across the river were the Dutch Blue Guards, who attacked the Jacobites entrenched in the village of Oldbridge. There after William committed his troops across the river in successive stages. First the Enniskilleners, horse and foot, crossed in the wake of the Dutch Blue Guards. There followed at other crossing places, each further downstream, the Huguenot regiments and the English foot, the Dutch foot, the Danish regiments and finally William with the cavalry and Wynne's dragoons. Once south of the river the Enniskillen foot, under Col. Gustavus Hamilton, fired volleys of musketry into the Jacobite cavalry sweeping to the attack of the Huguenot foot. Of the original squadron of 60 troopers of Jacobite horse, only six to eight survived this fire. When the Duke of Schomberg crossed the river, about two hours after the original crossing, he took over the direction of the Enniskillen and Huguenot regiments. While doing so this old soldier, aged 75, was killed in a Jacobite charge. In the same charge George Walker, a hero of the siege of Derry and by now Bishop Of Derry, was also killed. When the Jacobites retreated to the hill of Donore, south of Oldbridge, William put himself at the head of Wolseley's Enniskillen horse in the assault on the hill, saying: "Gentleman, you shall be my guards today. I have heard much of you. Let me see something of you". The Jacobite cavalry, after having with drawn southwards from the hill, counter- attacked the pursuing Enniskillen cavalry, routed them with considerable losses and drove them back onto the Danish cavalry. In the confusion Enniskilleners and Danes mistook each other for enemies and further losses were suffered. Wynne's dragoons charged the enemy horse with such vigour that they themselves were soon in trouble, having galloped too far in pursuit, but they rallied and returned to engage the enemy infantry. Eventually, the whole Jacobite army was in retreat.
     It is worth noting that in the wars in Ireland up to this point many of James Wynne's relations had been engaged in the fighting not always on the same side. James' mother was the grand-daughter of James Hamilton, first Earl of Abercorn. The latter's descendants, cousins of James Wynne, included Gustavus Hamilton, governor of Enniskillen and the Enniskilleners' commander at the Boyne, and Lt-General Richard Hamilton commander of the besieging forces at Derry and commander of the Jacobite foot at the Boyne. Richard's brothers, Anthony and John were both Major-Generals in the Jacobite forces at Derry. James Wynne's own nephew, Lord Strabane, had arrived outside the walls of Derry during the siege demanding surrender. His language is said to have been so violent that some of the more timid Protestants at once left to make their submission to King James.
The Belfast papers give some indication of the deployment of Wynne's dragoons after the Boyne. In April and May of the following year detachments were at Ballyshannon and Belturbet at a time when Sligo was still in Jacobite hands. In June Wynne's dragoons were among the forty squadrons of cavalry and dragoons which, in addition to thirty battalions of infantry, were assembled by the Williamite commander, Ginkel, for the purpose of forcing the crossing of the Shannon at Athlone. Athlone fell on the 30th June, 1691. On the 12th July St. Ruth, the Jacobite commander, offered battle at Aughrim, twenty miles south-west of Athlone. St. Ruth drew up his army on a ridge running south-east from the castle and village of Aughrim. Between the two armies the land was mostly bog, but on either wing harder ground supported a causeway or rough track. That at the northern end is the old Ballinasloe to Loughrea road, now superseded by a modern by-pass. In a battle which claimed 4,000 men killed on the Jacobite side and about half that number on the Williamite side, the breakthrough took place by the advance of the Williamite cavalry and dragoons along the northern causeway following an artillery bombardment. Fourteen squadrons, or about 1000 men, were involved in this advance, with Wynne's dragoons forming one of the squadrons. When St. Ruth rode over in the direction of this break-through to head personally a counter-charge of the French cavalry, he was decapitated by a cannon ball. This event demoralised his army. His cavalry, who had fought with great bravery at the Boyne, rode away. It has been suggested that the wealthier Jacobites who composed the cavalry as opposed to the infantry had by now more to gain from compromise, and being mounted they had the means to withdraw. In terms appropriate to that age, the upper class deserted the lower. Once the break-through was effected the Jacobite flank could be rolled up from its left. Aughrim was the last battle of the war and the last major battle to be fought in Ireland.
     The Green Fort at Sligo, which stood on the hill behind the site of the present-day hospital, still held out for the Jacobites under a redoubtable 70 year old hunchback named Teige O'Regan, who had been knighted by James and who with great resource and courage had held Sligo for fifteen months. In July, 1691, Colonel Mitchelbourne advanced towards Sligo from Ballyshannon while Lord Granard with troops who had fought at Aughrim reached Boyle and crossed the Curlew mountains. In these closing stages Col. Wynne's dragoons were engaged in action for the last time in Ireland. Mitchelbourne dispatched Col. Ramsay with 100 foot, 400 militia and 200 horse and dragoons from Enniskillen via Dromahaire to Ballysadare. This force moved on to the Barony of Tireragh, the land lying between the Ox mountains and the sea, where they seized a quantity of horses, cattle and sheep. Sir Teige, with the much smaller force of 200 foot and 80 horse, marched from Sligo to the bridge at Ballysadare to intercept Ramsay on his return. A fierce encounter took place. Sir Teige was getting the upper hand when Ramsay was reinforced by 200 of Wynne's dragoons. The defenders of Sligo retreated helter-skelter and were chased to the Green Fort by Wynne's dragoons. Thirty Jacobites were killed. Sir Teige only avoided capture because he was mistaken for the servant of a Jacobite storekeeper. He remarked: "If they ever catched Sir Teige so far again he would agree to be cracked as a hog cracks a potato".
The end came when Mitchelburne captured the outworks of the Green Fort and Lord Granard advanced from Ballysadare. Sir Teige surrendered. The garrison was allowed to march out with full honours of war, with their arms and baggage, drums beating, colours flying, match lighted and bullets in their mouths. Old Teige made his way to Limerick where he took advantage of the treaty signed on the 3rd October and sailed to France hoping to fight another day on the side of Louis.               The Belfast papers show us something of James Wynne's subsequent career in the service of William. In April 1694, together with his regiment, he left Ireland for Flanders. In October of that year, while serving at Ghent, he was promoted Brigadier-General. In June of the following year [1695]John Pain, the regimental agent in England, wrote to Wynne expressing regret at the news that the latter had been wounded in action. Three months later Pain wrote to James' younger brother, Lt-Col. Owen Wynne, also serving in Flanders, expressing condolences on James' death....
Thus died a gallant soldier. He was about 50 years of age. He had been chosen by Kirke at Inch as one of his best officers and had been promoted from captain to colonel to command a regiment of dragoons. The calibre of the officers sent from Inch to Enniskillen is demonstrated by the quality of Wolseley and Berry who accompanied Wynne. Col. Wolseley generously ascribed his success at the Battle of Newtownbutler to the excellence of his officers and the marksmanship of his men.     
     Before leaving James Wynne it is appropriate to add a further word about Wynne's dragoons and their subsequent history. Dragoons were by origin a body of mounted infantry who could be moved rapidly on a field of battle. Their principal weapon was the carbine, a shorter weapon than the infantry musket. They were less well mounted than cavalry and fought normally on foot, often firing on a cavalry charge from behind a hedge or similar cover. At Naseby, the decisive battle of the English civil war, having done just that, the dragoons mounted and charged an exposed flank of the King's infantry. After the Williamite wars, when Wynne's dragoons fought in Marlborough's army on the continent, the regiment was known as the 5th Royal Irish Dragoons. It was heavily engaged in the principal battles of Blenheim, Ramillies, Oudenarde and Malplaquet, and these battles are among its battle honours. In 1713, at the end of the war, the regiment was placed on the establishment of Ireland, but from then until 1799 there was a steady decline in its efficiency. It was split up in small detachments and billeted in public houses and similar accommodation where the supervision of the officers was ineffective. By the time of the rising of 1798 it had been infiltrated by subversive elements disloyal to the Crown. Although these soldiers were discovered and executed, George III ordered the whole regiment's disbandment in 1799.
     James died of wounds circa September 1695 in Roeselare, Flanders. In June 1695(4?) John Pain, the regimental agent in England, wrote to Wynne expressing regret at the news that the latter had been wounded in action. Three months later Pain wrote to James' younger brother, Lt-Col. Owen Wynne, also serving in Flanders, expressing condolences on James' death. He had died of wounds at Roeselare, now a sizeable Belgian town. Both Wood-Martin and O'Rorke in their respective histories of Sligo (the latter copying from the former) are in error in saying that James was killed at the Battle of Malplaquet, an event which did not take place until 1709. He was insolvent at his death..

Children of Brig-Gen James Wynne and Catherine Bingham