Ellen Frankland

(16 January 1597 - )
     Ellen Frankland was christened on 16 January 1597 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.

Henry Frankland

(25 February 1602 - )
     Henry Frankland was christened on 25 February 1602 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.

Hugo Frankland

(9 January 1590 - )
     Hugo Frankland was christened on 9 January 1590 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.

Isabella Frankland

(20 October 1622 - before 23 November 1622)
     Isabella Frankland was christened on 20 October 1622 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of John Frankland and Jane Unknown (Browne) (Frankland).
     Isabella died before 23 November 1622 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was buried on 23 November 1622 in Giggleswick.

Jane Frankland

(before 1570 - )
     Jane Frankland was born before 1570 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of John Frankland and Margaret Unknown (Frankland).
     Jane Frankland was mentioned in the will of John Frankland dated June 1574.

Jane Frankland

(2 August 1590 - )
     Jane Frankland was christened on 2 August 1590 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.

Jane Frankland

(26 May 1622 - )
     Jane Frankland was christened on 26 May 1622 in Clapham, Yorkshire. Jana, filia Willimi Frankland de Pheizor xxvj. She was the daughter of William Frankland and Maria Carr.

Jeneta Frankland

(22 March 1587 - )
     Jeneta Frankland was christened on 22 March 1587 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.

John Frankland

(16 May 1580 - February 1649/50)
     A member of the well known Yorkshire family, a branch of which became baronets of Thirkleby, and whose most notable member was Margaret's brother the Reverend Richard Frankland, one of the ejected ministers of 1662. In 1662 he opened perhaps the most famous of all dissenting academies at Rathmell in Giggleswick, where the house he built, with his and his wife's initials and the date 1686 is still to be seen; it is now divided into 3 cottages, standing in an enclosure preserving the name of College Fold.
     Probably descended from the Richard Frankland whose will was proved at York 3 Jul 1542, dated 12 Apr 1532 asking to be buried at St Alkyde, Gygilswyke [v.11 fol.55; Y.A.S. record series v.11 p.66].
. John Frankland was christened on 16 May 1580 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.
     John Frankland married Jane Unknown (Browne) (Frankland) on 9 February 1619/20 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the widow of Richard Browne, of Rathmell. He possibly married firstly Alicia Harding on 8 April 1616..
     John died in February 1649/50 in Clapham, Yorkshire, aged 69. John Frankland of Feizar.

Children of John Frankland and Jane Unknown (Browne) (Frankland)

John Frankland

(13 August 1659 - before 20 June 1679)
     He entered his father's Academy 3 May 1678 and was considered to the strongest man his age about Natland by his fellow students.. John Frankland was born on 13 August 1659 in Bishop Auckland, Durham, England. He was the son of Rev Richard Frankland and Elizabeth Sanderson.
     John died before 20 June 1679. He was buried on 20 June 1679 in Kendal, Westmorland, England.

John Frankland

(say 1525 - before 9 June 1574)
     John Frankland was born say 1525 in Yorkshire. He was the son of Richard Frankland.
     John Frankland married Margaret Unknown (Frankland) circa 1550 in England.
     John Frankland made a will dated June 1574 in Rathmell. John Frankland of Rathmell mentions in his will, his wife Margarett, eldest son Richard, daughter Jane, son Thomas, brother John [sic], & wishes to be buried at Giggleswick.
     John died before 9 June 1574 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was buried on 9 June 1574 in Giggleswick.
     His will was proved on 1 October 1574 at the Prerogative Court of York.

Children of John Frankland and Margaret Unknown (Frankland)

John Frankland

(10 June 1621 - )
     John Frankland was christened on 10 June 1621 in Clapham, Yorkshire. He was the son of William Frankland and Maria Carr.

Margaret Frankland

(4 March 1632 - 5 April 1700)
     Margaret Frankland was christened on 4 March 1632 in Winston, Durham. She was the daughter of John Frankland and Jane Unknown (Browne) (Frankland).
     Margaret Frankland married Robert Banks, son of Robert Banks and Ann Pudsey, circa 1649 in England.
     Margaret Frankland was mentioned in the will of Rev Richard Frankland dated 27 September 1698.
     Margaret died on 5 April 1700 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire, aged 68. Margareta Banks de Rathmell..

Children of Margaret Frankland and Robert Banks

Margaret Frankland

(after 1669 - 22 September before 1726)
     Margaret Frankland was born after 1669 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Rev Richard Frankland and Elizabeth Sanderson.
     In Rev Richard Frankland's will dated 27 September 1698 in Rathmell, Giggleswick, Margaret Frankland was named as executrix of the estate; For his will see The Older nonconformists in Kendall p.191-3. According to Richard Frankland's will (dated 27 Sep 1698) Margaret Banks had eaten at his table for 7 or 8 years, and no payment had been made for her maintenance. In a passage that breathes of justice rather than affection Frankland released his brother-in-law Robert Banks and Margaret his wife for all claims for "tabling" her for such a period. In another passage he discharged his nephew Joseph Banks of Sheffield for all claims for the "tabling" provided he released to him all such goods as had lately belonged to Robert, and had been granted by Robert to Joseph for Margaret's maintenance. This having been done, he bequeathed 20 shillings to Robert, £4 to Margaret, and 5 shillings each to Joseph, his wife, and their two children. Robert's elder son Robert, then of Hull, and his children were to have 10 shillings each.
     Margaret Frankland married Samuel Smith on 19 June 1701. Mr Samuel Smith of York & Mtris Margaret frankland of Rawthmel marryed June 1701..
     Margaret died 22 September before 1726 in York, Yorkshire. Mr Samuel Smith of York bur. his wife Sep 22. She was Mr Frankland's daughter of Rauthmel.
In 1726, Jos Banks will mentions the child of my cousin Mrs Mgt Smith of York dec'd..

Child of Margaret Frankland and Samuel Smith

Mary Frankland

(after 1670 - after 27 September 1698)
     Mary Frankland was born after 1670 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Rev Richard Frankland and Elizabeth Sanderson.
     Mary Frankland married Major John Harris. He was a soldier.
     In Rev Richard Frankland's will dated 27 September 1698 in Rathmell, Giggleswick, Mary Frankland was named as executrix of the estate; For his will see The Older nonconformists in Kendall p.191-3. According to Richard Frankland's will (dated 27 Sep 1698) Margaret Banks had eaten at his table for 7 or 8 years, and no payment had been made for her maintenance. In a passage that breathes of justice rather than affection Frankland released his brother-in-law Robert Banks and Margaret his wife for all claims for "tabling" her for such a period. In another passage he discharged his nephew Joseph Banks of Sheffield for all claims for the "tabling" provided he released to him all such goods as had lately belonged to Robert, and had been granted by Robert to Joseph for Margaret's maintenance. This having been done, he bequeathed 20 shillings to Robert, £4 to Margaret, and 5 shillings each to Joseph, his wife, and their two children. Robert's elder son Robert, then of Hull, and his children were to have 10 shillings each.
     Mary died of smallpox soon after her father after 27 September 1698.

Child of Mary Frankland and Major John Harris

Richard Frankland

(8 June 1668 - before 4 May 1689)
     Richard Frankland was christened on 8 June 1668 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of Rev Richard Frankland and Elizabeth Sanderson.
     He entered his father's Academy 13 April 1682 [1680 in DNB]. He was a young man of great promise, and of so edifying a life that in 1694 his father contemplated writing his biography.
     Richard died of smallpox before 4 May 1689 in Sheffield, Yorkshire. He was buried on 4 May 1689 in Sheffield.

Richard Frankland

(before 1550 - before 3 April 1625)
     Richard was a yeoman in Giggleswick, Yorkshire.. He was born before 1550 in Yorkshire, England. He was the son of John Frankland and Margaret Unknown (Frankland).
     In John Frankland's will dated June 1574 in Rathmell, Richard Frankland was named as heir; John Frankland of Rathmell mentions in his will, his wife Margarett, eldest son Richard, daughter Jane, son Thomas, brother John [sic], & wishes to be buried at Giggleswick.
     Richard Frankland married Isabella Carr on 26 July 1579 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire.
     Richard Frankland made a will dated 1 April 1625 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. Richard Frankland, yeoman of Rathmell, to be buried at Giggleswick.
     Richard died before 3 April 1625 in Rathmell, Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was buried on 3 April 1625 in Giggleswick. Ricardus Frankland de Rathmell. His will asked to be buried there.
     His will was proved on 9 May 1625 at the Prerogative Court of York.

Children of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr

Richard Frankland

(say 1500 - )
     According to Postlethwaite, he appears on the Muster roll of 1539 and the Lay Subsidy roll of 1543.
     The 'Flodden roll" (2 years before that battle) which omits Rathmell lists a Rich. Frankland in Stonford (Staniforth) armrd with a bowe, able, horse and harness. [Brayshaw p. 48]. Richard Frankland was born say 1500 in England.

Child of Richard Frankland

Richard Frankland

(14 February 1627 - 1711)
     Yeoman of Close House, Giggleswick.. Richard Frankland was christened on 14 February 1627 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of William Frankland and Maria Carr.
     Richard died in 1711 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire.

Child of Richard Frankland and (?) Unknown (Frankland)

Richard Frankland

     Richard Frankland married Lydia Whalley. Richard Frankland was the son of Richard Frankland and (?) Unknown (Frankland).

Richard Frankland

(18 August 1594 - )
     Richard Frankland was christened on 18 August 1594 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.

Rev Richard Frankland

(1 November 1630 - 1 October 1698)
     Rev Richard Frankland was born on 1 November 1630 in Rathmell, Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of John Frankland and Jane Unknown (Browne) (Frankland).
     Richard was educated from from 1640 to 1648 at Giggleswick Grammar School, Yorkshire.
     Richard matriculated at Christ's College, Cambridge University, from 1648 to 1655. Admitted minor pensionary (aged 17) at Christs College, Cambridge 18 May 1648. The tone of the college was cultured puritanism. He was a hard student and took his degree with distinction. B.A. 1651/2, M.A. 1655. Richard was a clergyman from 1653 to 1662. The Dictionary of National Biography states: After graduating he preached for short periods at Hesham, Northumberland; Houghton le Spring and Lanchester, Durham. At Lanchester he received Presbyterian ordination on 14 September 1653. 'Discouragements' led him to remove to a chaplaincy at Ellenthorpe Hall, near Boroughbridge, West Riding of Yorkshire, in the family of John Brook who was a strong Presbyterian. He left Ellenthorp to become curate to Lupthorn, rector of Sedgefield, Durham. Sir Arthur Haslerig put him into the rich vicarage of Bishop Auckland some time before August 1659. [Vicar of St Andrews, Auckland from 14 September 1653 according to Peile]. Some post was designed for him in the college at Durham. At Bishop Auckland where two of his children were born, he confined himself to his parochial duties. After the restoration he was one of the first to be attacked for nonconformity leading to his ejectment in 1662. He retired to his patrimony in Rathmell where he lived some years in privacy. In March 1670 he began receiving students at Rathmell, totalling 304. The academy had six migrations - moving to Natland near Kendal in Westmorland in 1674, in 1683 the five mile act compelled him to move to Calton Hall, the seat of the Lamberts in the parish of Kirkby Malham, West Riding and in 1684 to Dawson Fold in Westmorland just outside the five mile radius from Kendal. In 1685 he retired to Hart Barrow, just inside the Lancashire border, convenient for escaping a writ from either county. From 1686 to 1689 he was at Attercliffe, a suburb of Sheffield. He left Attercliffe at the end of July 1689 on the death of his favourite son and returned to Rathmell.
     Rev Richard Frankland married Elizabeth Sanderson on 11 October 1658 in Brancepeth, Durham.      
Rev Richard Frankland paid the tax on 2 hearths in 1665/66 in Rathmell, Giggleswick Yorkshire.
     Rev Richard Frankland was mentioned in the 1672 hearth tax list in Rathmell, Giggleswick, with 3 hearths. A Richard Frankland had 1 hearth at Giggleswick and a Richard had 3 hearths at Rathmell. A Stephen Frankland had 5 hearths and "more per a schoolehouse" 1 hearth at Giggleswick.
     Rev Richard Frankland was mentioned in the 1675 hearth tax list in Natland, Kendal, Westmorland, 6 hearths. He resided there till the Spring of 1683 conducting a school.
     Rev Richard Frankland lived at Dawson Fold, Kirkby Malham, Yorkshire, from 1683 to 1684.
     Rev Richard Frankland lived at Attercliffe, Sheffield, Yorkshire, from 1686.
     On October 8 1689 the Toleration Act listed houses of Mr Richard Ffrankland of Rathmell and others.
     A Puritan divine who took in his sister Margaret Banks. His portrait is in Dr Willliam's Library. He established Attercliffe Theological Academy circa 1686, after three years he was succeeded by Rev Timothie Jolly, who renamed the Academy "Christ's College" who lasted for 23 years [F Bradbury, in "Transactions of the Hunter Archaeolgical Society v.5 p.18, 1943].
     In the Northowram register he had an indulgence for a Protestant / Presbyterian meeting house at Rusholme.
     His 'northern academy' was transferred to Manchester by John Chorlton and continues as the Manchester New College., removed in 1889 from London to Oxford..
     Rev Richard Frankland made a will dated 27 September 1698 in Rathmell, Giggleswick . For his will see The Older nonconformists in Kendall p.191-3. According to Richard Frankland's will (dated 27 Sep 1698) Margaret Banks had eaten at his table for 7 or 8 years, and no payment had been made for her maintenance. In a passage that breathes of justice rather than affection Frankland released his brother-in-law Robert Banks and Margaret his wife for all claims for "tabling" her for such a period. In another passage he discharged his nephew Joseph Banks of Sheffield for all claims for the "tabling" provided he released to him all such goods as had lately belonged to Robert, and had been granted by Robert to Joseph for Margaret's maintenance. This having been done, he bequeathed 20 shillings to Robert, £4 to Margaret, and 5 shillings each to Joseph, his wife, and their two children. Robert's elder son Robert, then of Hull, and his children were to have 10 shillings each.
     Richard died on 1 October 1698 in Rathmell, Giggleswick Yorkshire, aged 67. He 'died in the midst of his scholars'. He was buried on 5 October 1698 in Giggleswick. His daughters placed an ornate mural tablet to his memory - the inscription states "of the Franklands of Thirkleby".
     Frankland, Richard (1630-1698), nonconformist tutor, was born on 1 November 1630, at Rathmell, Giggleswick, Yorkshire, the son of John Frankland (d. before 1650). Between 1642 and 1648 he was educated at Giggleswick grammar school, before being admitted on 18 May 1648 at Christ's College, Cambridge. He took his BA in 1652 and proceeded MA in 1655. Meanwhile, he had begun to preach at Hexham in Northumberland, and then at Houghton-le-Spring and Lanchester. He was ordained by presbyters at St Nicholas's, Durham, on 14 September 1653. About 1655 he left Lanchester and became chaplain to John Brook at Ellenthorp Hall, near Boroughbridge in Yorkshire. He then became curate at Sedgefield in co. Durham. Oliver Cromwell's plans for a college in Durham included a post for Frankland, but the patent for establishing the college, issued in May 1657, was never put into effect.

On 11 October 1658 Frankland married Elizabeth (1627–1706), daughter of Samuel Sanderson of Hedley Hope, co. Durham, and his wife, Barbara Liddell. They had three sons and four daughters. At some point before August 1659 Frankland was presented to the living of St Andrew's, Bishop Auckland, by its patron Sir Arthur Hesilrige. Following the Restoration a local attorney named Bowster demanded of him ‘publicly before the congregation’ (DNB) whether he intended to conform. Frankland responded that he would take this decision when the terms of conformity were settled and that meanwhile the king had dispensed with conformity in his declaration of 25 October 1660. Bowster and a neighbouring clergyman then obtained the keys to the church and locked Frankland out. Frankland turned to the law for redress, having the perpetrators indicted for riot at the quarter sessions. The defendants had the case moved up to the assizes where it was dismissed on a technicality, there being a flaw in the indictment. Bishop Cosin offered to institute him at Bishop Auckland if he would receive episcopal ordination, but Frankland was unwilling to renounce his ordination by presbyters or to receive an episcopal ordination in private.

Following his ejection Frankland returned to Rathmell, where his daughter Barbara was buried in August 1662 and other children were baptized in 1664, 1666, and 1668. He lived modestly, his house being rated for two hearths in the 1665–6 hearth tax returns. By 1672–3 it had increased to three hearths. It may be from this period that the story dates of Frankland's going to London and using his contacts with the old presbyterian lord chamberlain, the earl of Manchester (d. 1671), to meet and chastise the king ‘to reform your life, your family, your kingdom, and the church’, to which a somewhat startled monarch replied ‘I will do what I can’, before saying ‘I thank you sir’, and retreating into the council chamber (BL, Add. MS 4460, fol. 49).

Frankland opened his first dissenting academy at Rathmell on 8 March 1670. It taught ‘logic, metaphysics, somatology, pneumatology, natural philosophy, divinity and chronology’ (DNB). Morning prayers were at seven, lectures finished by noon, private study continued until prayers at six. Under the declaration of indulgence he was licensed to preach at Rathmell on 22 July 1672. Between February and May 1674 he moved to Natland, near Kendal, where he continued to teach until the middle of 1683. During this time Frankland assisted at the first nonconformist ordination in Yorkshire on 10 July 1678. The increasing persecution of nonconformists brought problems and in March 1681 Oliver Heywood recorded that Frankland had been excommunicated in the ecclesiastical court, although he later received absolution. Natland's proximity to Kendal made Frankland's academy vulnerable under the Five Mile Act, and by 20 June 1683 he had moved his school to Calton Hall in Kirkby Malham, the seat of the Lambert family, 7 miles from Skipton. Late in 1683 he moved again, to Dawson Fold, Crosthwaite, near Kendal, which he left in September 1684 for Hartborough, near Cartmel in Lancashire. Hartborough had the advantage of being on the Lancashire–Cumberland border and hence it was easier to avoid a writ issued in either county by simply crossing into the other.

By 8 November 1686 Frankland had moved to Attercliffe, near Sheffield, taking advantage of James II's religious policy of toleration and obtaining a dispensation at a cost of 50s. Following the revolution of 1688 Frankland registered Rathmell as a meeting-house on 8 October 1689. However, while the Toleration Act protected him as a minister, it did not prevent attacks upon his dissenting academy. The authorities were particularly agitated by his continued training of students for the ministry, for which he received grants from the Presbyterian Fund from 1690. On 2 February 1691 Frankland was excommunicated for not appearing before the chancellor of the archbishop's court in York in answer to a citation of May 1690. With the support of Philip, Baron Wharton, and Sir Thomas Rokeby, a judge in the court of common pleas, who approached the secretary of state, Viscount Sydney, Frankland was able to get the sentence reversed. The absolution was publicly read in Giggleswick church. Frankland was one of the Yorkshire nonconformist clergymen who met at Wakefield on 2 September 1691 to consider the ‘heads of agreement’ sent from London to promote union between presbyterians and Independents. Attempts to suppress the academy by the clergy in Craven in 1692 through a petition to the new archbishop of York, John Sharp, were unsuccessful. Sharp asked Archbishop Tillotson for guidance but in the end seems not to have made use of his advice not to mention nonconformity but instead explain the objections to licensing the academy on the grounds that there was already a school in the parish and that Frankland was breaking his university oath by teaching outside the universities. A meeting between Sharp and Frankland followed at which Frankland was shown the petition against him, but Sharp did not greatly pursue it and seemed more interested in the deficiencies of the local clergy, which Frankland was only too happy to discuss. Frankland also faced prosecution in London, but this was quashed on 14 February 1695.

In 1697 Frankland published his only work, Reflections on a letter writ by a nameless author to the reverend clergy of both universities. Frankland was increasingly subject to ill health, writing on 25 October 1697 that he was ‘afflicted with gravel and wind’ (Nicholson and Axon, 188–9). He died ‘of the stranguary, or a universal decay’ (ibid., 189) on 1 October 1698, and was buried on the 5th in Giggleswick church. He was survived by his wife and three of his daughters. His will of 27 September 1698 gave his wife £30 per annum and made his three daughters his executors, with four ‘yeomen’ as overseers. One of his daughters died in 1700, followed by his wife in 1706. The other daughters, Elizabeth (1664–1739) and Margaret (1672–1718) married one Hill and Samuel Smith, respectively.

Stuart Handley
Sources
Venn, Alum. Cant. · Calamy rev., 211–12 · F. Nicholson and E. Axon, The older nonconformity in Kendal (1915), 113–98 · I. Parker, Dissenting academies in England (1914), 64–8 · A. Gordon, ed., Freedom after ejection: a review (1690–1692) of presbyterian and congregational nonconformity in England and Wales (1917), 267–8 · The Rev. Oliver Heywood … his autobiography, diaries, anecdote and event books, ed. J. H. Turner, 4 vols. (1881–5) · [J. Hunter], ed., Letters of eminent men, addressed to Ralph Thoresby, 1 (1832), 171–5 · IGI · G. F. Nuttall, ‘Assembly and association in dissent, 1689–1831’, Councils and assemblies, ed. G. J. Cuming and D. Baker, SCH, 7 (1971), 301 · DNB
Likenesses
oils, DWL [see illus.]
© Oxford University Press 2004–5
All rights reserved: see
legal notice




Stuart Handley, ‘Frankland, Richard (1630-1698)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/10085, accessed 24 Sept 2005]
Richard Frankland (1630-1698): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10085

Portrait of Richard Frankland (1630-1698), by unknown artist"
Richard Frankland (1630-1698), by unknown artist
Frankland, Richard (1630-1698), nonconformist tutor, was born on 1 November 1630, at Rathmell, Giggleswick, Yorkshire, the son of John Frankland (d. before 1650). Between 1642 and 1648 he was educated at Giggleswick grammar school, before being admitted on 18 May 1648 at Christ's College, Cambridge. He took his BA in 1652 and proceeded MA in 1655. Meanwhile, he had begun to preach at Hexham in Northumberland, and then at Houghton-le-Spring and Lanchester. He was ordained by presbyters at St Nicholas's, Durham, on 14 September 1653. About 1655 he left Lanchester and became chaplain to John Brook at Ellenthorp Hall, near Boroughbridge in Yorkshire. He then became curate at Sedgefield in co. Durham. Oliver Cromwell's plans for a college in Durham included a post for Frankland, but the patent for establishing the college, issued in May 1657, was never put into effect.

On 11 October 1658 Frankland married Elizabeth (1627–1706), daughter of Samuel Sanderson of Hedley Hope, co. Durham, and his wife, Barbara Liddell. They had three sons and four daughters. At some point before August 1659 Frankland was presented to the living of St Andrew's, Bishop Auckland, by its patron Sir Arthur Hesilrige. Following the Restoration a local attorney named Bowster demanded of him ‘publicly before the congregation’ (DNB) whether he intended to conform. Frankland responded that he would take this decision when the terms of conformity were settled and that meanwhile the king had dispensed with conformity in his declaration of 25 October 1660. Bowster and a neighbouring clergyman then obtained the keys to the church and locked Frankland out. Frankland turned to the law for redress, having the perpetrators indicted for riot at the quarter sessions. The defendants had the case moved up to the assizes where it was dismissed on a technicality, there being a flaw in the indictment. Bishop Cosin offered to institute him at Bishop Auckland if he would receive episcopal ordination, but Frankland was unwilling to renounce his ordination by presbyters or to receive an episcopal ordination in private.

Following his ejection Frankland returned to Rathmell, where his daughter Barbara was buried in August 1662 and other children were baptized in 1664, 1666, and 1668. He lived modestly, his house being rated for two hearths in the 1665–6 hearth tax returns. By 1672–3 it had increased to three hearths. It may be from this period that the story dates of Frankland's going to London and using his contacts with the old presbyterian lord chamberlain, the earl of Manchester (d. 1671), to meet and chastise the king ‘to reform your life, your family, your kingdom, and the church’, to which a somewhat startled monarch replied ‘I will do what I can’, before saying ‘I thank you sir’, and retreating into the council chamber (BL, Add. MS 4460, fol. 49).

Frankland opened his first dissenting academy at Rathmell on 8 March 1670. It taught ‘logic, metaphysics, somatology, pneumatology, natural philosophy, divinity and chronology’ (DNB). Morning prayers were at seven, lectures finished by noon, private study continued until prayers at six. Under the declaration of indulgence he was licensed to preach at Rathmell on 22 July 1672. Between February and May 1674 he moved to Natland, near Kendal, where he continued to teach until the middle of 1683. During this time Frankland assisted at the first nonconformist ordination in Yorkshire on 10 July 1678. The increasing persecution of nonconformists brought problems and in March 1681 Oliver Heywood recorded that Frankland had been excommunicated in the ecclesiastical court, although he later received absolution. Natland's proximity to Kendal made Frankland's academy vulnerable under the Five Mile Act, and by 20 June 1683 he had moved his school to Calton Hall in Kirkby Malham, the seat of the Lambert family, 7 miles from Skipton. Late in 1683 he moved again, to Dawson Fold, Crosthwaite, near Kendal, which he left in September 1684 for Hartborough, near Cartmel in Lancashire. Hartborough had the advantage of being on the Lancashire–Cumberland border and hence it was easier to avoid a writ issued in either county by simply crossing into the other.

By 8 November 1686 Frankland had moved to Attercliffe, near Sheffield, taking advantage of James II's religious policy of toleration and obtaining a dispensation at a cost of 50s. Following the revolution of 1688 Frankland registered Rathmell as a meeting-house on 8 October 1689. However, while the Toleration Act protected him as a minister, it did not prevent attacks upon his dissenting academy. The authorities were particularly agitated by his continued training of students for the ministry, for which he received grants from the Presbyterian Fund from 1690. On 2 February 1691 Frankland was excommunicated for not appearing before the chancellor of the archbishop's court in York in answer to a citation of May 1690. With the support of Philip, Baron Wharton, and Sir Thomas Rokeby, a judge in the court of common pleas, who approached the secretary of state, Viscount Sydney, Frankland was able to get the sentence reversed. The absolution was publicly read in Giggleswick church. Frankland was one of the Yorkshire nonconformist clergymen who met at Wakefield on 2 September 1691 to consider the ‘heads of agreement’ sent from London to promote union between presbyterians and Independents. Attempts to suppress the academy by the clergy in Craven in 1692 through a petition to the new archbishop of York, John Sharp, were unsuccessful. Sharp asked Archbishop Tillotson for guidance but in the end seems not to have made use of his advice not to mention nonconformity but instead explain the objections to licensing the academy on the grounds that there was already a school in the parish and that Frankland was breaking his university oath by teaching outside the universities. A meeting between Sharp and Frankland followed at which Frankland was shown the petition against him, but Sharp did not greatly pursue it and seemed more interested in the deficiencies of the local clergy, which Frankland was only too happy to discuss. Frankland also faced prosecution in London, but this was quashed on 14 February 1695.

In 1697 Frankland published his only work, Reflections on a letter writ by a nameless author to the reverend clergy of both universities. Frankland was increasingly subject to ill health, writing on 25 October 1697 that he was ‘afflicted with gravel and wind’ (Nicholson and Axon, 188–9). He died ‘of the stranguary, or a universal decay’ (ibid., 189) on 1 October 1698, and was buried on the 5th in Giggleswick church. He was survived by his wife and three of his daughters. His will of 27 September 1698 gave his wife £30 per annum and made his three daughters his executors, with four ‘yeomen’ as overseers. One of his daughters died in 1700, followed by his wife in 1706. The other daughters, Elizabeth (1664–1739) and Margaret (1672–1718) married one Hill and Samuel Smith, respectively.

Stuart Handley
Sources
Venn, Alum. Cant. · Calamy rev., 211–12 · F. Nicholson and E. Axon, The older nonconformity in Kendal (1915), 113–98 · I. Parker, Dissenting academies in England (1914), 64–8 · A. Gordon, ed., Freedom after ejection: a review (1690–1692) of presbyterian and congregational nonconformity in England and Wales (1917), 267–8 · The Rev. Oliver Heywood … his autobiography, diaries, anecdote and event books, ed. J. H. Turner, 4 vols. (1881–5) · [J. Hunter], ed., Letters of eminent men, addressed to Ralph Thoresby, 1 (1832), 171–5 · IGI · G. F. Nuttall, ‘Assembly and association in dissent, 1689–1831’, Councils and assemblies, ed. G. J. Cuming and D. Baker, SCH, 7 (1971), 301 · DNB
Likenesses
oils, DWL [see illus.]
© Oxford University Press
Stuart Handley, ‘Frankland, Richard (1630-1698)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/10085, accessed 24 Sept 2005]
.

Children of Rev Richard Frankland and Elizabeth Sanderson

Robert Frankland

(27 November 1620 - )
     Robert Frankland was christened on 27 November 1620 in Clapham, Yorkshire. Robertus filius William Frankland de Pheizer x June 1621. He was the son of William Frankland and Maria Carr.

Samuel Frankland

(circa 1667 - before 21 March 1682/83)
     Samuel Frankland was born circa 1667. He was the son of Rev Richard Frankland and Elizabeth Sanderson.
     Samuel died before 21 March 1682/83 in Kendal, Westmorland, England. He was buried on 21 March 1682/83 in Kendal, WES, ENG. In his 15th year.

Thomas Frankland

(18 May 1559? - )
     Thomas Frankland was christened on 18 May 1559? In Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of John Frankland and Margaret Unknown (Frankland).
     Thomas Frankland was mentioned in the will of John Frankland dated June 1574. Thomas Frankland was christened on 18 May 1599? In Giggleswick, Yorkshire.

William Frankland

(30 September 1584 - before 6 February 1623/24)
     He married into the Carr family of Close House, who were formerly tenants and leaseholders under the Earl of Cumberland. The widow of his grandson, another Richard Frankland 1711-1737, Lydia nee Whalley, married Mr George Carr of Giggleswick in 1735 and in 1755 whe was described as "widow of Kendal". William Frankland was christened on 30 September 1584 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was the son of Richard Frankland and Isabella Carr.
     William Frankland married Maria Carr.
     William died before 6 February 1623/24 in Clapham, Yorkshire, England. Willelmi Frankland de Feizer vj Feb 1623/4..

Children of William Frankland and Maria Carr

(?) Fraser (Tutor of Foyers)

     (?) Fraser (Tutor of Foyers) married Margaret MacKenzie, daughter of Kenneth MacKenzie.

Agnes Fraser

     Agnes Fraser married Simon MacKenzie as his second wife, in 1650. The Hon. Simon MacKenzie of Lochslinn married, secondly, in 1650 marriage contract dated at Kingillie on the 12th of January), Agnes, daughter of William Fraser, V. of Culbokie, and widow of Alexander Mackenzie, I. of Ballone, brother of Sir John Mackenzie of Tarbat, with issue:
1. Kenneth Mor Mackenzie, first of Glenmarkassie and Dundonnel.
2. Isobel, who, in 1673, married Murdoch Mackenzie, VI. of Fairburn, with issue.
3. Elizabeth, who married the Rev. Roderick Mackenzie, minister and laird of Avoch - the land of which he had purchased - son of John, Archdean of Ross, natural son of Sir Roderick Mackenzie, Tutor of Kintail, with issue
.

Agnes or Ann Fraser

     Agnes or Ann Fraser married Kenneth MacKenzie VII as his second wife. She was the daughter of Hugh, third Lord Lovat.

Alexander Fraser

     Alexander Fraser married Janet Ross Fraser, daughter of William, Earl of Ross, and Mary Unknown of the Isles, circa 4 June 1375.