John Hagan

(circa 1834 - 23 March 1888)
     John Hagan was born circa 1834.
     John died on 23 March 1888 in Dunganon RD, Tyrone.
     The administration of his estate was granted on 19 August 1905 Administration of the estate of John Hagan late of Munderadoe, county Tyrone, who died 23 March 1888 granted at Armagh to John Hagan labourer, Effects £26.

John Hagan

(circa 1839 - 1874)
     John Hagan was born circa 1839.
     John died in 1874 in Dunganon RD, Tyrone.

John Hagan

(circa 1875 - 1875)
     John Hagan was born circa 1875.
     John died in 1875 in Dunganon RD, Tyrone.

John Hagan

(10 January 1841 - )
     John Hagan was christened on 10 January 1841 in Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. He was the son of Daniel Hagan and Joanna Canway?

John Hagan

(8 September 1837 - )
     John Hagan was christened on 8 September 1837 in Cavanreagh, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. He was the son of Bernard Hagan and Maria Rafferty.

John Hagan

(circa 1833 - 23 February 1890)
     John Hagan was born circa 1833.
     John died on 23 February 1890 in Lisrone, Benburb, Dunganon RD, Tyrone. John Hagan, bachelor, aged 57, farmer. The informant was Hugh Daly, cousin.

John Hagan

(circa 1859 - 21 May 1921)
     John Hagan was born circa 1859 in Ireland.
     John died on 21 May 1921 in Drummond?, Benburb, DungannonUnion, Tyrone. Aged 62, married, labourer, his on John Hagan was the informant (X).

John Hagan

(before 1818 - )
     John Hagan was born before 1818 in Tyrone, Ireland.
John Hagan married Mary Kerr on 20 May 1838 in Termonmaguirk, Tyrone, Ireland. The marriage was witnessed by Hugh Kerr & Rose Kerr. Location, of Edenangh/Edenamph [O'Hagan].

Margaret Hagan

(20 December 1842 - )
     Margaret Hagan was christened on 20 December 1842 in Gortfin, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Bernard Hagan and Maria Rafferty.

Margaret Hagan

(27 October 1844 - )
     Margaret Hagan was christened on 27 October 1844 in Gortfin, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Bernard Hagan and Maria Rafferty.

Mary Hagan

(3 March 1840 - 11 May 1886)
     Mary Hagan was also known as O'Haghan in records. Mary Hagan was also known as O'Hegan in records. Mary Hagan was also known as O'Hagan in records. She was born on 3 March 1840 in Inish in Sultan townland, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone, Ireland. Her marriage and death certificates state that she was the daughter of Charles O'Haghan/Heghan and Ellen Moynahan. She was born c.1842 if 20 as stated on her arrival in November 1862; c.1843 by her stated age of 27 at marriage in November 1870; c.1843 if 28 in Nov 1871 or Jan 1872 at her eldest son's birth, c.1844 if 34 as stated at her son's birth in July 1878; but in 1842 if aged 44 at her death in May 1886. Her death certificate stated that she was born in Dungannon.. She was the daughter of Charles Hagan and Ellen Meenagh. Mary Hagan was christened on 3 April 1840 in Termonmaguirk. Mariam ex Charles Hagan et Elena Menagh. Sponsors? Filui/Felix Menagh et Elena McGurk, Inish. Inish was part of Sultan townland. There were 2 Felix Minaghs in Termonmaguirk in the Griffith Valuation, one in Aghagogan, the other in Streefe Glebe. A Felix Meenagh aged 71, widower was living in 1901 at 13 Streefe Glebe, Loughmacrory, Tyrone with his son Hugh & daughter Mary. However Fr Luney of co. Kerry suggested it is poor Latin/transcription of Filius (son of Menagh) which is not unusual for older siblings or cousins as sponsors. RootsIreland has indexed it as Felix.
     Mary Hagan and Elizabeth Hagan arrived per "Shalimar" on 15 November 1862 at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Mary O'Hegan aged 20, & Elizabeth O'Hegan, 26, as unassisted passengers. Their occupation was spinster, nationality - Irish. The ship (1591 tons) departed 22 August, master - Stanley, carrying 427 passengers, 414 in steerage, arriving 15 Nov 1862. Mary Hagan was mentioned in a letter from Elizabeth Hagan dated 1 January 1870. Dear Cousin Let me know if my
Uncle Owen is living or dead or
my Uncle Barn.d [Bernard?] Campbell I have wrote to him but never got no letter as I do not know whither [whether?] the [they?] are living or dead, but my Cousins must be living at the old place. And also let me [know] where Annie is if you know where
She is and Send her address to me
or if you write a few lines to my Uncle
or Owen or his family. And See if the [they?] know any thing of her. You would do me a great favour or to any of my friends or Send my address to them as I hope I will hear the voice of the rest of my friends yet I Send my kind love to all them that was along with
with [sic] poor Brother on his last journey to his home, and thank them all
for the kindness the [they?] did for
him, and it was a great heart
Breack [Break?] to all his Sisters in this
Colony, it is knowthing [nothing?] if we had Seen him before he died. I Some
times think that it must have been
to [too?] much drink that was the cause
of my brothers death but I hope
I my [may?] be wrong, if he was a
drunkerd [drunkard?] he was the only one in the family I have not a great deal more to let you know this time
only this Country at the preasent [present?] time is very dull, and we have had a very dry Season I [In?] may
we had Six months and Scarcly [Scarcely?] a Shower of rain during that time
Some people had to drive cattle miles for water but know [now?] it is the reverse, their [there?] is two [too?] much and very little feed for cattle in
fact we have had Some die our Selves through Cold and want of grass, but we will soon have the worse over know [now?] as this is the worst
month in the year in this country
but living is very cheap here
you will get a Ton of Flour for Ten pounds, the Same of the best potatoes for Two pounds and every thing else in Caparison [Comparison?] and wages
for a working man is about Seven Shillings per day, and farming men one pound per week and rations, and you will See by this that a Steady well doing man can do well enough here altho it is not know [now?] what it has been. I have nothing more to Say at preasent [present?] but hoping you will write by
return and give us a good long
letter and I will be Sure and give
you more Knews [news?] in the next
as I expect a letter from Helen
and I
remain
Dear Cousin
Yours for Ever
Elizabeth G Hagan

Elizabeth G. Hagan
or Mrs. G. Hamilton
Windermere
Cardigan P.O [Post Office?]
Balarat, Australia.
Mary Hagan married Edward Colbert, son of Edward Colbert and Catherine MacAuliffe, on 5 November 1870 in St Alipius RC church, Ballarat, Victoria. Married by licence. She was an illiterate servant, aged 27, and he called himself Edward Colebart, miner, aged 30. Mary Hagan was mentioned in a letter from Elizabeth Hagan dated 12 February 1877. Mary Colbert nee Hagan, the sister of Elizabeth Hagan, of Windermere, who wrote to her cousin Mary Hagan, Dungannon mentioning Mr Colbert:
Windermere, 12th Feby 1877
Dear Cousin
I received your letter in due time and I hope you will excuse me for being so long in answering [it?] And I am happy to say this & leaves me enjoying good [health?] trusting when this reaches you I will find you enjoying the same great Blessing my [sister?] Helen sent a letter to directed to Uncle, and five pounds in it to Mother, and mother never got the five pounds nor any word from us until we was three years from home, and he had signed my mothers name and got the money.
You need not be hard on us for not writing oftener as we cannot do it our Selves, and Sometimes we cannot get it down So you must just Excuse us, but we think it was
Brother Johns fault and not Uncle. I believe my Brother has been very foolish and Bad tempered since my mother died Helen sent home a letter and he would not let Annie see it, which him and his Wife behaved very unkindly to her. I blame all Annies down fall all on them. She was entitled to some of her fathers effects, if none of the rest of us got anything. Dear Cousin please let me know if you got any act [account?] of her whether dead or alive. I must think she is dead. I would have wrote you sooner only I was frightened we would have got a bad act [account?] of her.
I have been unwell for some time Back. I am troubled with the liver Complaint.
My Sister Mary & Husband and family is all well. She has 1 son & 2 Daughteours [Daughters?], and [send?] their Kind love to you all. We live about three miles apart. My Sister Helen is in New Zealand and has been their [there?] this six years, and got married their [there?], to a man named Henry Swayne, and the [they?] have one child But, she has had bad luck her husband got a hurt Some time ago, in the head and about six months ago he went wrong in the head, and has been in the Asylum ever Since and the last letter I got from her he was no Better; he was a native of Ireland and a respectable man. I have sent her Five pounds to her, and Mr Colbert sent her five pounds also, to help her along as she is left in a very lonly [lonely?] place, and we expect Brother John, for to send her some money as maney [many?] pound she sent home when she could spare it.
I hope the McBrides has not got the key to carry all belonging to my late Father & Mother
I send my kind respects to my uncle & Aunt & family and let me know how he is geting [getting?] his health; and send me his age I was sorrow [sorry?] to hear of my
Cousin Henrys Death, but it is the Lords will and the road we [must?] all go. Dear Mary, Please send me your age. I hope when you receive this you are all enjoying good health. I send my kind love to Cousin Annie
I hope you and her will enjoy many happy days as I may say she is all your guide. We wondered to hear that you was not married by this time. I send my best regards to Charles and his little Girl.
I am going to send you next time a likeness of my Girl & Marys to raise your family, so you see whether Charles daughteour [daughters?] or mines is the Bigest. I send my best respects to Cousin James & Daniel also. I hope the [they?] are all married and a long letter to send me about their family
I remain Dear Cousin
Yours for Ever
Elizabeth Hagan
Cardigan post-office
tell my brother John to write me himself and let me know about all my aunts
uncles & Inquirers & friends
Miss Mary C Hagen [Hagan?]
Irish St. Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ireland
. Mary Hagan was mentioned in a letter on 6 March 1882 in Haddon, Victoria. Haddon March 6th 1882. Dear Cousion [Cousin?]
I take the
pleasure of writing you
these few lines hoping
to find you the same
as it leaves me at present
time Dear cousion [cousin?] I
lost my Sister Elizabeth
which I felt very sorrow [sorry?]
for it she died on 9th
May in the year 1879
She died with a large
tumbour [tumour?] on the liver in
the inside which caused
her death She tried all
the doctor's all round
my dear cousion [cousin?] my
Sister Ellen is [in] new
Zealand I have not Seen
her this thirteen years
my dear cousion [cousin?] She has
buried her husband
he died with a hurt on
the head which he got
mining in a clame [claim?] as
the same as Elibeth [Elizabeth?] first
husband with the same
it is four years since
Mr Swain is dead Dear
cousion [cousin?] I buried my
eldest daughter Mary Anne
She was four years & nine
[weeks?] old & died with
the scarlet fever within
an hours sickness my
eldest Son called for
your father John
was very ill with the
same fever he recovered
he is a fine boy know [now?]
& his [he is?] growing to be a fine
Schooler [Scholar?] my dear cousion
[cousin?] If we had as much learning
as my Son we would have
wrote before now to you
but I did not like to let
the world know my trouble
we would not wish to
let the world now [know?] that
we could not write If
you were raird [reared?] in the
poor house you are as
much though [thought?] of as if
you were raird [reared?] in
the Bishops placa [palace?] if
you can only write
your own name
my dear cousion [cousin?] you
would have many a
letter before this only
wating [waiting?] for my own Son
to write the letters now he
his [is?] able to write let me
now [know?] how you are getting
on & all my friends & cousion [cousin?]
Annie & I called my eldest
daughter for you & you
& your Sister my eldest
Son [for] my poor uncle John
and second daughter for my
Mother & my Sister my
second Son for his father
Edward my third for
my father that layed
in Tyrone my dear
cousion [cousin?] for I have no
learning I have good memor [memories?]
& I never forgot home
my mother no [nor?] yet my
father no [nor?] yet my dear
uncle John let me know
how my dear uncle
is getting & my cousion [cousin?]
Charles & his daughters
& my cousion [cousin?] James
are getting on my dear
Aunt & Uncle & are
they enjoying health
as when I left home
as they are getting old
people is charles married
yet good bye & god bless
you uncle & aunt from
your old affection
friend mary hagan. She was admitted to the Hospital, Ballarat, on 17 April 1886 by Dr Woinarski. She was described as Mary Coleman, aged 44, of Windermere, born co. Tyrone, 23 years in Victoria.
     Mary died of cancer of the stomach on 11 May 1886 in the District Hospital, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, aged 46. Mary Coleman [sic], aged 44, born at Dungannon, Tyrone, daughter of Charles O'Heghan farmer & Ellen; buried 13th May at Ballarat! witnessed by Edward Colbert & William Wilson. She was buried on 13 May 1886 in Smythesdale. The Friends of Mr EDWARD COLBERT, of Haddon, are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late beloved wife to the place of interment, the Scarsdale Cemetery. The funeral will leave the Ballarat Hospital on Thursday, the 13th instant, at 11 o’clock a.m., and will pass through Haddon. STEPHEN WELLINGTON, Undertaker, 3 Dawson street (opposite the Roman Catholic Church, and next Adelphi hotel.

Children of Mary Hagan and Edward Colbert

Mary Hagan

(circa 1833 - 7 April 1895)
     Mary Hagan was born circa 1833 in Tyrone. Her death certificate gives her age as 55, but the memorial card states aged 62. She was the daughter of John Hagan and Ellen Mullen. Mary Hagan was mentioned in a letter on 1 January 1870 in Australia. Dear Cousin Let me know if my
Uncle Owen is living or dead or
my Uncle Barn.d [Bernard?] Campbell I have wrote to him but never got no letter as I do not know whither [whether?] the [they?] are living or dead, but my Cousins must be living at the old place. And also let me [know] where Annie is if you know where
She is and Send her address to me
or if you write a few lines to my Uncle
or Owen or his family. And See if the [they?] know any thing of her. You would do me a great favour or to any of my friends or Send my address to them as I hope I will hear the voice of the rest of my friends yet I Send my kind love to all them that was along with
with [sic] poor Brother on his last journey to his home, and thank them all
for the kindness the [they?] did for
him, and it was a great heart
Breack [Break?] to all his Sisters in this
Colony, it is knowthing [nothing?] if we had Seen him before he died. I Some
times think that it must have been
to [too?] much drink that was the cause
of my brothers death but I hope
I my [may?] be wrong, if he was a
drunkerd [drunkard?] he was the only one in the family I have not a great deal more to let you know this time
only this Country at the preasent [present?] time is very dull, and we have had a very dry Season I [In?] may
we had Six months and Scarcly [Scarcely?] a Shower of rain during that time
Some people had to drive cattle miles for water but know [now?] it is the reverse, their [there?] is two [too?] much and very little feed for cattle in
fact we have had Some die our Selves through Cold and want of grass, but we will soon have the worse over know [now?] as this is the worst
month in the year in this country
but living is very cheap here
you will get a Ton of Flour for Ten pounds, the Same of the best potatoes for Two pounds and every thing else in Caparison [Comparison?] and wages
for a working man is about Seven Shillings per day, and farming men one pound per week and rations, and you will See by this that a Steady well doing man can do well enough here altho it is not know [now?] what it has been. I have nothing more to Say at preasent [present?] but hoping you will write by
return and give us a good long
letter and I will be Sure and give
you more Knews [news?] in the next
as I expect a letter from Helen
and I
remain
Dear Cousin
Yours for Ever
Elizabeth G Hagan

Elizabeth G. Hagan
or Mrs. G. Hamilton
Windermere
Cardigan P.O [Post Office?]
Balarat, Australia.
     Mary Hagan received a letter dated 30 June 1872. Brisbane June 30 1872: Dear Mary,
I take the [prusute?][persuit?] of writting [writing?] to you these few lines to let you know I was over joyed to hear that charley has got married I thought you would not let him go first I think the young men has forgot where you live
I think your old by wurd [byword?] will come in time you often said you ware [were?] wunderning [wondering?] who to take but now you are wunderning [wondering?] who will get you I think Miss Anney will lave [leave?] you behind her I do not advise her wate [wait?] for you
But never mind: peraps [perhaps?] you are better whare [where?] you are as to be married to some of them as far as myself, I cannot say I got A bad one for if I got my pick of A thousand I could not get A better one I got all my own way and A good cathlick [catholic?]
Dear mary [Mary?] I often think of the trubble [trouble?] yous [you?] have with my father and me but I
hope our father in heaven will reward yous [you?] all for your kindness to watch him
Dear Mary I think as mutch [much?] of home as the first Day I left and always Dreaming of yous [you?] thinking about yous [you?] all
Dear Mary I was so glad to think Sarah was comming [coming?] to meat [meet?] you as She would be write [right?] at home with anney [any?] of your fathers family I wish you to let me know whitch [which?] Quin [Quinn?] is that: that Charley got married to I should like to know is the cathradle [cathedral?] Bilt [built?] yet plase [please?] give my kindest love to Miss Anney
tell her I never shall for get [forget?] they [the?] good old Days that we spent together when we were young I never shall for get [forget?] them though far A waye [faraway?] always in my mind
Dear Mary I never may think of going home now for I could not stand the cold now But I hope if we do not meet in this world we will meet in heaven my sister is in hops [hopes?] to see yous [you?] all yet she says she should like to spend the remander [remainder?] of her Days at home with yous [you?] all in they [the?] land of her Birth she often talks of the time that Josey and her usted [used?] to go to see yous [you?]: she sayes [says?] he is A big boy now [prese?] [please?] remember her to Mrs Montague and family my sister and family joines [join?] me to send love to yous [you?] all I should like to know how Mrs O'Hagen and your father is getting their helths [healths?] good by for God Bless yous [you?] all : I have A nother [another?] Daughter Born they [the?] 3 of July
Susan [Greame?]
A Susan McGurk (Grein) has a daughter Ellen Helena in 1872, and a Mary Theresa in 1870, another Susan Catherine born and died in 1876. Anton Grein died in 1903. Susan Grein dierd 13 Aug 1916, parents Sarah Louoghran & John McGurk, so not likely to be closely related.
     Mary Hagan received a letter dated 3 September 1874. Mary C Hagan Cape John
County terion [Tyrone?]
Chagen Irish Street
Dungannon Ireland

Moores Flat Sep 3rd 1874
Friend Mrs Hagan I wrote to my Father Peter Doyle about the month of May I enclosed him a small check [cheque?] for œ2 for which I have got no answer I wish him to let me no [know?] if he has got it if not I will send him another if he will just answer my letter Mrs Hagan if you will answer this letter and let me no [know?] how it is with him you will oblige your Friend and well wisher
James Doyle
P.S Direct your letter to Moores Flat
post office Nevada County, California, America.
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Elizabeth Hagan dated 12 February 1877. Mary Colbert nee Hagan, the sister of Elizabeth Hagan, of Windermere, who wrote to her cousin Mary Hagan, Dungannon mentioning Mr Colbert:
Windermere, 12th Feby 1877
Dear Cousin
I received your letter in due time and I hope you will excuse me for being so long in answering [it?] And I am happy to say this & leaves me enjoying good [health?] trusting when this reaches you I will find you enjoying the same great Blessing my [sister?] Helen sent a letter to directed to Uncle, and five pounds in it to Mother, and mother never got the five pounds nor any word from us until we was three years from home, and he had signed my mothers name and got the money.
You need not be hard on us for not writing oftener as we cannot do it our Selves, and Sometimes we cannot get it down So you must just Excuse us, but we think it was
Brother Johns fault and not Uncle. I believe my Brother has been very foolish and Bad tempered since my mother died Helen sent home a letter and he would not let Annie see it, which him and his Wife behaved very unkindly to her. I blame all Annies down fall all on them. She was entitled to some of her fathers effects, if none of the rest of us got anything. Dear Cousin please let me know if you got any act [account?] of her whether dead or alive. I must think she is dead. I would have wrote you sooner only I was frightened we would have got a bad act [account?] of her.
I have been unwell for some time Back. I am troubled with the liver Complaint.
My Sister Mary & Husband and family is all well. She has 1 son & 2 Daughteours [Daughters?], and [send?] their Kind love to you all. We live about three miles apart. My Sister Helen is in New Zealand and has been their [there?] this six years, and got married their [there?], to a man named Henry Swayne, and the [they?] have one child But, she has had bad luck her husband got a hurt Some time ago, in the head and about six months ago he went wrong in the head, and has been in the Asylum ever Since and the last letter I got from her he was no Better; he was a native of Ireland and a respectable man. I have sent her Five pounds to her, and Mr Colbert sent her five pounds also, to help her along as she is left in a very lonly [lonely?] place, and we expect Brother John, for to send her some money as maney [many?] pound she sent home when she could spare it.
I hope the McBrides has not got the key to carry all belonging to my late Father & Mother
I send my kind respects to my uncle & Aunt & family and let me know how he is geting [getting?] his health; and send me his age I was sorrow [sorry?] to hear of my
Cousin Henrys Death, but it is the Lords will and the road we [must?] all go. Dear Mary, Please send me your age. I hope when you receive this you are all enjoying good health. I send my kind love to Cousin Annie
I hope you and her will enjoy many happy days as I may say she is all your guide. We wondered to hear that you was not married by this time. I send my best regards to Charles and his little Girl.
I am going to send you next time a likeness of my Girl & Marys to raise your family, so you see whether Charles daughteour [daughters?] or mines is the Bigest. I send my best respects to Cousin James & Daniel also. I hope the [they?] are all married and a long letter to send me about their family
I remain Dear Cousin
Yours for Ever
Elizabeth Hagan
Cardigan post-office
tell my brother John to write me himself and let me know about all my aunts
uncles & Inquirers & friends
Miss Mary C Hagen [Hagan?]
Irish St. Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ireland
.
     Mary Hagan was mentioned in the will of Charles Hagan dated 6 April 1883.
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Anne Hagan dated 11 November 1883. 576 West 49 Street, New York
Dear Mary
I arrived safe on Monday November 11th had a nice passage if I thought it was [so?] nice crossing the water I would have years past. James thought the Germanic would arrive day previous Dan McMullan and him spent that extra day at the pier looking out for its arrival James met me at Castle Gardens I need not mention how glad we were to see each other after leaving Castle Gardens
James brought me by the elevated Railroad that goes through the street to a private family where I was to stop until he got our apartment properly furnished in less than one week we went to our own home it has taken a great deal to furnish it style he has done it
Maggie Canway and Minnie Sharkey are changeing [changing?] there [their?] situations Maggie is stopping with a friend of her mothers a Mrs Nolan and Minnie Sharkey is stopping with her brothers
Maggie Canway is stopping this last week with Minnie Sharkey
the [they?] are going on Monday to new situations I will only see them once I daresay in a month then
both of them came and stopped with me for 2 days helping me to arrange my furniture
James is so good giving me all the pleasure he possible [possibly?] can
brought me to the park on sunday such a nice park beautiful birds and wild beasts caged he goes to his business every morning at half past 7 and returns at 5 every evening punctual
after he goes away in the morning I lock my door and goes to a beautiful church next street 8 o clock Mass while I have such a good times and good time I am better to attend to this all parties tells me I got settling down nice soon after my arrival plenty get tossing about for a long time I would have written to you last week only I heard Mr Quin Ann Street was going home for christmas I intended sending you a presant [present?] and the Drum to Tom hart that I promised him Mr Quin and John O'Neills son Ann Street was in our house a few nights past Quin laughed at the notion said he told a few parties that for a joke
O'Neill says he will go early in June Quin has promised first one he hears or knows going he will send them to me James talks often about you with all your faults he loves you still.
There was 2 holidays in this city last week one of them James and I went down to Jersey city spent a nice day in B. McElhones, on our way going
James says to me you will be a yankee after this day. there is a joke in this city that you are never a true yankee till you have been to Jersey city
James brought me to Colvey grave yard with him showed me part that was called Willies burgh he says last time he was there a man that lives there this long time said he might not look for grave he was looking for that day on account no head stone it could never be traced
A H [Annie Hagan?].
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Anne Hagan dated 15 August 1884. New York August 15th 1884
My Dear Sister
I am glad to know by your letter that your health is quite well had you a warm summer.
Most parties out here says this was the coolest summer in there [their?] memory. Annie Birney was visiting some parties in this city she called with
us Monday week last she was telling us her Father had
gone to Ireland some days
previous, James had a letter
and papers from Edward
Mooney last week
I did not get sending your card visits soon as I expected
However I have them parceled [parcelled?],
send with first one going that way. Tommy Rogers was admiring you Sunday week he says you were always a good girl
he says he sung in Dungannon choir long ago,
I hope Mickey Donaghy is quite well tell him that love letter will go very soon. I hope Mrs Daly and family are quite
well, write soon and let me
know how you are getting
along. James sends his kind
love to Minnie and yourself
and accept same
from your fond Sister
Annie Hagan
[Stamps] [Post Mark]
New York
Oct 15. 8.30 PM G
Miss Mary Hagan
Irish Street
Dungannon, Co Tyrone Ireland.
     Mary Hagan received a letter from James Hagan dated 3 October 1884. Miiss Mary Hagan
C/O Mr Peter McShane
Irish St. [Street?] Dungannon
Co Tyrone Ireland

519 West 48th Street, New York
3th October 1884
My Dear Sister
I suppose [?] this time you are beginning tothink I have forgotten you by long silence but such is not the case, I hope you are enjoying good health thank God Annie and I never enjoyed better health than at the present time. We have had a very warm summer here.
You could scarcely imagine it there was some days you would not know where to go to get an air and men, and Horses dropping dead with heat in every street and as for night the sultry heat was full worse than the sun.
We are now in the fall and for 3 months the weather will be beautiful not too hot or too cold. I am glad to hear that Minnie is getting to be a fine girl. I hope she will pay attention to her school be a good girl and take her Clergys advice in everything she does. Ask her to write to me there is nothing would please me more than to receive a letter from her. Annie and I are kept very busy. We have a lot to mind and a great responsibility is on our shoulders but still we are very content many of our old country people call to see us. We have John McCabe every night M. Sharkey has taken appartments [apartments?] from me next house to myself and Teresa that was brought up in Peter Donnellys and married to a son of M. Kellys from [Killeshel?] has appartments [apartments?] from me second house
to myself there is scarely an night passes but we have some one from Dungannon or the vicinity calls to see us from what I can hear there is great changes in Dungannon I seen by the Derry Journal yesterday that Robert Geattens is dead, it is surprising how many are going off. If I am spared for a few years to pay a visit to Dungannon I suppose there will be very few faces that I will be able to recognise.
I have always the hope of seeing Dungannon once more but life is very uncertain "Man proposes but God disposess" however come what may we must all be satisfied with Gods holy will. I hope Mrs Hagan is enjoying good health and that her business is prospering every day. Annie was glad to hear that you recd [received?] the two Pictures all right. We have two of the same ourselves. I intend to get my own taken in the same way and send it to you.
I hope you will keep up your heart and let nothing trouble you with Gods help things will go right with us all yet. give
our kind regards to P. McShane wife and family M. Donaghey James McElhone and all inquiring friends and cquaintances. Enclosed you have have a small present (one pound), to keep your pocket. Write me soon and
give me all particulars. Annie joins me in sending my kind love in the warmest manner.
Remains, Your affectionate Brother, James Hagan.
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Anne Hagan dated 21 March 1885. New York March 21st 1885
Dear Sister Mar
How delighted I was getting
the shamrock in such
good time such a grand
parade as we had here
such a number of Irish in
N. York, Johnny Barton called
with us last week his wife
says they intend going out
west, Mr McMullan moved
next door to us last week
preveous [previous?] to that they lived
20 blocks from us we live
now as near you and Peter
McShane Mr Mc, says he
intends a visit
to Dungannon end of July,
you mind telling me that
James was born on Palm
Sunday, we will be talking
about you often that day
I hope Mr and Mrs McShane
Baby
are quite well
write a long letter soon
kind regards to Minnie Hagan
wishing you a very happy Easter
I am Dear Mary
your fond sister
Annie Hagan

579 West 48 St.
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Anne Hagan dated 15 October 1885. New York October 15th, 1885
My Dear Sister Mary
I received your letter a few mornings
past, I am sorry I cannot let my Brother
read it on account off [of?] you nameing [naming?]
the untruth the lady wrote about him to
Donaghmore. Now Mary like a good
girl do you not mind what any
one says at home or abroad about
James he is what he always was
doing his best to get along and
be able to meet every man
he has that hopes I wish any
of us had been near so
good as him. The day
Joe McGill landed in N. [New?] York
we were on an excursion
to coney Island. The Ship he
came in passed us on the
water though we did not think
that time - Joe McGill was in it
he stopped in his cousins E [East?] Side
of the city that was on Sunday
he landed he came around on
Tuesday evening following to our
place my Brother was just home
from Brooklyn Oh we were
so glad when he came
and surprised, he came around
that night again with some of his friends
and with our company and them
we had quite a jolly night good
singing, Joe sang all his songs
even the hot ashfelt - next night
he came around with a young
Mr McMahon from Armagh.
McMahon recited beautifully
and McGill sang twice for
me - Chiming Bells
he bade us goodbye that
night starting out West next
morning promising to come
in 2 years New York to see
all off [of?] us. However next
morning he missed the boat
and came to our house
and stopped until boat was
ready that afternoon.
I had a great days talk with
him about Dungannon he
was telling me about Maggie
Mullan marriage though I heard
it previous, telling me Henery [Henry?]
Campbell was living and well
and Mick Donaghy was well
and all I inquired about
James Quin [Quinn?] was telling me
last night he had a letter from
Mrs Carbrery from Memphis
City - young Hugh Henery [Henry?]
was 2 nights this week with us
he was not in this City for
almost a year he is gone
to work in Jersey yesterday
morning - he was inquiring about
you and telling about his Uncle
Hugh - Mr McMullan is back
quite content with his tour
he is a nightly visitor with
us since every night when
my Brother comes from his buisness
[business?] at half past 9, he gets
Mr Mc and my boarders engaged at Dominoes
Mrs McMullan is delighted to hear
of the wealthy relations she has
got - oh such beautiful presents
they have sent her. write when
you get this letter and I promise
never be so long again from
writeing [writing?]. I will answer your
next letter right away
it was very nice seen the the Cardinal
laid out in the Catheradal [Cathedral?] I was
there Tuesday night - Police guarding
the people in rank to get seeing him.
Write soon excuse haste
Ever your fond sister, A. [Annie?] Hagan.
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Anne Hagan dated 9 June 1889. N. York [New York?]
Dear Sister
Oh the sad news
contained in your letter
our darling niece we
loved so much. death -
Lord have mercy on her
she was so good and wise
her picture I had put past
until I get over grieving about
her. The little remembrance
you sent I will always treasure
It is as green as yesterday
to me first day she
went Mrs McAvoys school
how often Dear Lord have mercy
and I went to the door
see if she was coming home
every little song and poem
she wrote in a book
I have here where I look
at them, I feel so bad about
her The Dominican
church has a convent attached
on Ascension Thursday last
Mass - Nuns had a procession
strange, such a lovely
feeling came over me
about Minnie could
think nothing but her
wishing I had her beside
me looking on. that same
night - I dreamt about her
Knowing our dear was parted
from one or ones she loved in this world
consoles us to know that she is gone
to the ones she loved in Heaven
[on?] aiding them by her prayers
put these little cards in
your prayer book every time
you look at them say a
little prayer to our dear join
with our other friends
praying for us three
James joins you in deepest
sympathy
Your very grieved Sister
Annie
PS When you write tell me what age
was on her coffin
A H [Annie Hagan?].
     Mary Hagan received a letter from Anne Hagan dated 1 January 1890. Coracrow. Monday
Dear Mary
I got a pleasing
surprise Willie called this
morning on his way to where
his Son is living no letter
from James yet. I cannot
attempt to name how I felt
hearing about Joseph Hart
I was dreaming about him
different night [Juerans?]
Edward Mooney was at home
last week he came on
Saturday weak [week?] went back
to a new Situation on Monday
I am quite well
hoping you
are all the same
Annie Hagan


[Enclosed with letter is the following Memory Card]

"Blessed are they that mourn, for they shall be comforted."
- St. MATT. v., 5.

[Sign of the Cross]

OF YOUR CHARITY

Pray for the Soul of

MARY HAGAN,

DIED APRIL 7th, 1895.

Aged 62 Years.


LET US PRAY

Absolve, we beseech Thee O Lord, the soul of Thy
servant Mary, that being dead to this world, she
may live to Thee; and whatever sins she has committed
through human frailty, do Thou wipe away by the
pardon of Thy most merciful Goodness. Amen.
We have loved her during life; let us not abandon
her until we have conducted her by our prayers,
into the house of the Lord. - St. AMBROSE.
+++++++++
Coracrow, Wednesday

Dear Mary
I received your letter
I am glad you are all
quite well I am enjoying
the country first rate.
You will be kind enough
to send my tin case with
Ellen Mooney she intends
going to the market tomorrow.
I wont mind takeing [taking?] my trunks
until I get a few more letters
from James. I know you
will care them for me
in your own room.
I never went to Pomeroy
Chapel or town since
I came to this country.
I am fond of the quiet
little chapel convenient to us.
[Moores?] at the Bridge will
have apples and nuts for
Halloweve it will be
so pleasent [pleasant?] burning them
on the hearth. I am
glad Mickey Donaghy is quite
well give him my kind
wishes tell him when I
return. I hope I will know
him right away Kind
love to Minnie Elizabeth O'Hagan
Excuse haste Write often
I am Dear Mary, Your fond Sister, Annie Hagan. Mary Hagan was mentioned in a letter on 26 July 1892. From New York, signed James but probably written by Annie, mentions little Miss mcShane.
     Mary died on 7 April 1895 in Irish St, Dungannon, Tyrone. Mary Hagan, aged 55, spinster, housekeeper, informant: Peter McShane, cousin, present at death.
Memorial card included with letter from Annie Hagan to Mary Hagan 1890! - [Enclosed with letter is the following Memory Card]
... Pray for the Soul of / MARY HAGAN, DIED APRIL 7th, 1895./ Aged 62 Years.

Mary Hagan

(29 December 1844 - )
     Mary Hagan was christened on 29 December 1844 in Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Charles Hagan and Catherine McGrath.

Mary Hagan

(23 August 1835 - )
     Mary Hagan was christened on 23 August 1835 in Cavanreagh, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Bernard Hagan and Maria Rafferty.
Mary Hagan married Charles Hughes on 29 April 1866 in Dungannon, Tyrone. Marriage transcript stated daughter of Bernard, he was the son of Michael Hughes.

Mary Hagan

(21 January 1838 - )
     Mary Hagan was christened on 21 January 1838 in Mulartiny/Mullaghslin, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Daniel Hagan and Joanna Canway?

Michael Hagan

(1 April 1845 - )
     Michael Hagan was born on 1 April 1845 in Tullywiggan, Derryloran, Tyrone, Ireland. Gary O'Hagan descends from a Charles O'Hagan, mason and his wife Jane Millar, of Derryloran, co. Tyrone. Their son Michael who emigrated to Vic was born 1 April 1845 and baptised the same day at Tullywiggan. He was the son of Charles Hagan and Jane Millar.
Michael Hagan married Bridget Brown on 19 June 1862 in St Mary's, Castlemaine, Victoria. He was a mason aged 27 and she was a housemaid aged 22, both of Taradale. They had Margaret born 1863 in Melob9urne, Mchael born 1873 in Williamstown, Patrif Francis born 1877 in Camperdown; Thomas who aapears to be unregistered but died aged 16 at Campedown n 1888. Their son Michael died in 1928 aged 53. An earlier Michael died in 1865 aged 1.

Minnie Hagan

(before 1883 - )
     Minnie Hagan was born before 1883 in Dungannon, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Charles Hagan and Catherine Gorman.
     Minnie Hagan was mentioned in the will of Charles Hagan dated 6 April 1883.

Patriarch Hagan

( - before 1877)
     Patriarch died before 1877 in Tyrone, Ireland.

Children of Patriarch Hagan

Patrick Hagan

(circa 1844 - before 13 July 1904)
     Patrick Hagan was born circa 1844 in Tyrone.
     Patrick Hagan was recorded on the 1901 census in Bockets, Aghnahoe DED, Tyrone. Patrick Hagan, aged 57, farmer, widower, with his daughter Catherine, aged 20, housekeeper, both RC, born in co. Tyrone and able to read & write.
     Patrick died before 13 July 1904 in Bockets, Killishall, Tyrone, Ireland.
     His will was proved on 13 July 1904. Patrick Hagan, of Bockets, parish of Killishall, widower....to his daughter Catherine Hagan of Bockets his house and farm, to his daughter Mary Ann now in England 1/-, to his brother John now in Liverpool, 1/-.

Child of Patrick Hagan

Patrick Hagan

(circa 1846 - )
     Patrick Hagan was born circa 1846 in Tyrone. He is probably the Patrick Hagan aged aged 55 with wife Annie 42, and children Felix aged 10, born c. 1891, Mary Anne 15 Bridget 13, Sarah Jane 8, Ellen 6 and Alice Kate, 4. They were residing at Munderrydoe, Pomeroy, Tyrone. In 1911 Patrickwas 64, Annie 50, daughter Mary A Hagan, was widowed! aged 25, Felix was 10, Sarah Jane 18, Alice Kate 14 and Bridget M Hughes, grand-daughter was 2; presumably Mary A's child.. He was the son of Felix Hagan.

Patrick Hagan

(9 May 1839 - )
     Patrick Hagan was christened on 9 May 1839 in Mullaghslin, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. Patrinum/Patrict.. ex Johannes Hagan et Elena Mullan, sp. Patrictus Hagan & Anna Hagan. He was the son of John Hagan and Ellen Mullen.

Patrick Hagan

(circa 1830 - 1885)
     Patrick Hagan was born circa 1830 in Ireland. He was the son of Patrick Hagan and Rose McCarton. Patrick Hagan was buried in 1885 in Smythesdale, Victoria. Patrick O'Hagan (where Mary O'Hagan/Colbert is buried).
     Patrick died in 1885 in Sago Hill, Victoria. Patrick O'Haggan, son of Patrick & Rose nee Macartin/Macarton, aged 55, died at Sago Hill, thus born c 1830.

Patrick Hagan

     Patrick Hagan married Rose McCarton.

Child of Patrick Hagan and Rose McCarton

Patrick Hagan

(28 February 1841 - )
     Patrick Hagan was christened on 28 February 1841 in Cavanreagh, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. He was the son of Charles Hagan and Catherine McGrath.

Patrick Hagan

     Patrick Hagan was the son of Felix Hagan and Mary Ann Unknown.
Patrick Hagan married Anne Galbraith on 21 May 1885 in Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. He was of Monderdaol, son of Felix, his wife Anne was the daughter of James, of Grenacomac, witnesssed by Margaret McGuigan. Note:
Termonmaguirk, Tyrone, FR B MURPHY/ DISP IN BANNS REV D BYRNE/ WTNS FROM CONOURCRAE.

Patrick Hagan

(circa 1825 - )
     Patrick Hagan was born circa 1825 in Tyrone.
Patrick Hagan married Bridget Fox on 8 March 1848 in Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was of Glenn, bachlor & shpinster, witnessed by Daniel Hagan & Patrick Fox.

Rosam Hagan

(6 October 1839 - )
     Rosam Hagan was christened on 6 October 1839 in Canreagh, Termonmaguirk, Tyrone. She was the daughter of Bernard Hagan and Maria Rafferty.

Anna Sophia Hagar

( - 17 May 1863)
     Anna Sophia Hagar married John Dunbar, son of Sir Archibald Dunbar 6th Bart of Northfield and Helen Gordon Cumming, on 20 December 1825.
     Anna died on 17 May 1863.

Children of Anna Sophia Hagar and John Dunbar

Rev Frederick Haggitt

     Rev Frederick Haggitt married Merielina Sophia Cocksedge, daughter of Martin Thomas Cocksedge and Mary Susanna Le Heup, on 10 September 1846 in Fornham St Martin, Suffolk.

Mary Hague

(10 May 1782 - )
     Mary Hague was born on 10 May 1782 in Ecclesfield, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of William or Abraham Hague and Mary Rich.