Dora Maryon Wesley Hall

(15 December 1891 - 5 May 1948)
     Dora was nick-named Dodo. She was born on 15 December 1891 in 'Ellerslie', Toorak, Victoria. She was the daughter of James Wesley Hall and Mary Frederica Dora Dempster.
     Dora Maryon Wesley Hall and Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris were engaged in January 1913. Major the Hon. George Henry Morris, Irish Guards, whose engagement to Miss Dora Wesley Hall is announced, is the younger son of the late Lord Killanin, a former Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and brother and heir presumptive of the present peer. Major Morris, who is in his 41st year, entered the army in 1892. He served with the Tochi Field Force on the North West Frontier, India, during 1897-8, for which he has the medal with clasp; and in 1902 saw active service in the South African War, being mentioned in dispatches and receiving the medal with four clasps. His brother Lord Killanin, was born in 1867, and is still a bachelor.
     Dora Maryon Wesley Hall married Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris on 29 April 1913 in Roman Catholic Cathedral, Westminster, Middlesex, England.
     Dora Maryon Wesley Hall married Lt Col Gerard Prideaux Tharp as her second husband, on 12 March 1918 in St James, Piccadilly, London, England. The marriage took place very quietly at St James church, Piccadilly, on Tuesday March 12, between Major Gerard Tharp, Rifle Brigade, General Staff, son of the late Horace Neville Tharp, of Crossmaglen, county Armagh, and Dora, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel the Hon. George Morris, Irish Guards, and daughter of the late James Wesley Hall, of Melbourne.
     Dora Maryon Wesley Hall lived at 4 Lancaster Gate Terrace, London.
     Dora Maryon Wesley Hall lived at Ferring, Sussex and at 15 Gt Cumberland Place, London, England, 1928.
     Dora died on 5 May 1948 in Chippenham, Cambridgeshire, England, aged 56. Mrs Gerard Tharp, widow of Lieutenant Colonel Gerard Prideaux Tharp, DL, JP, died at her home near Ely in Cambridgeshire, yesterday. She was Dora Maryan, second daughter of James Wesley Hall, of Melbourne, Australia, and was twice married. Her first marriage took place in 1913 to Lt Col the Hon. Georg Henry Morris, the second son of the first Lord Killanin, a lord of appeal in ordinary from 1889 to 1900. Lt Col Morris was killed in action at Villers Cotterets less than a month after the outbreak of war in 1914, leaving a son who succeeded his uncle in the family honours in 1927. After some four years of widowhood she married Lt Col Gerard Tharp, who died in 1934. There were two children of the second marriage, a son and a daughter. The son, Pilot Officer John Tharp was killed in action in North Africa in 1943 and the daughter, Mrs Mary Phillipa Tharp, survives her mother. Mrs Tharp played a prominent part in local affairs in Cambridgeshire, have been elected to the county council in 1934 and appointed a JP in 1939. From 1935 to 1946 she was chairman of the Cambridgeshire Women's Conservative Association, and for the whole of the period of the a1939-1945 war and for some 12 months afterward was county organizer for the WVS.

Child of Dora Maryon Wesley Hall and Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris

Children of Dora Maryon Wesley Hall and Lt Col Gerard Prideaux Tharp

Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris

(16 July 1872 - 1 September 1914)
Hon. George Henry Morris in 1913
     Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris was born on 16 July 1872 in Spiddal, Galway, Ireland. He was the younger son of 1st Baron Morris & Killanin, Michael Morris, of Spidall, co. Galway, and Anna, daughter of the Hon G H Hughes, a Baron of the Court of the Exchequer in Ireland.
     He served as an officer in the Irish Guards between 1892 and 1914. Lieut-Colonel Hon. George Henry Morris was the first commanding officer to lead the Irish Guards regiment into battle. He joined The Rifle Brigade in India as 2nd Lieutenant in 1892, after having passed from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. In 1897 he was appointed Adjutant of the 3rd Battalion The Rifle Brigade, a position he held for four years. He saw active service with the Tochi Valley Expeditionary Force in 1897-98, receiving the medal with clasp. In the second Boer War he served with Damant’s Horse from 1901-1902, being present in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He was twice Mentioned in Dispatches and received the Queen’s Medal with four clasps. On the conclusion of the war he rejoined the Staff College, which he had entered in 1901, and passed out in 1903. Obtaining his Majority on transfer to the Irish Guards in 1906, he was next a General Staff Officer at the Army Staff College from 1908-1911, finally becoming Lieut-Colonel when succeeding Charles FitzClarence to the command of the 1st Battalion Irish Guards in July 1913.
He took the battalion to France on August 12, 1914, at the outbreak of World War I and was killed in action on September 1, during the Retreat from Mons when the 4th (Guards) Brigade formed a rear-guard for the 2nd Division in La forêt de Retz near Villers-Cotterêts. Colonel Morris was recognised as one of the most brilliant lecturers in the British Army, and was an authority on strategy, tactics, and military history. He was a member of the Guards’ Club, the Garrick Club and the County Galway Club
.
     Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris and Dora Maryon Wesley Hall were engaged in January 1913. Major the Hon. George Henry Morris, Irish Guards, whose engagement to Miss Dora Wesley Hall is announced, is the younger son of the late Lord Killanin, a former Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and brother and heir presumptive of the present peer. Major Morris, who is in his 41st year, entered the army in 1892. He served with the Tochi Field Force on the North West Frontier, India, during 1897-8, for which he has the medal with clasp; and in 1902 saw active service in the South African War, being mentioned in dispatches and receiving the medal with four clasps. His brother Lord Killanin, was born in 1867, and is still a bachelor.
     Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris married Dora Maryon Wesley Hall, daughter of James Wesley Hall and Mary Frederica Dora Dempster, on 29 April 1913 in Roman Catholic Cathedral, Westminster, Middlesex, England.
     George was killed in action on 1 September 1914 in France aged 42. He is commemorated on the Guards Grave, Villers Cotterets Forest, Aisne, France (reference II/1).

Child of Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris and Dora Maryon Wesley Hall

Michael Morris Lord Killanin

(30 July 1914 - 25 April 1999)
     Michael Morris Lord Killanin was born on 30 July 1914 in London, England. He was the son of Lt Col, Hon George Henry Morris and Dora Maryon Wesley Hall.
     In 1927 he succeeded as Lord Killanin when his uncle Martin Henry FitzPatrick Morris, 2nd Baron Killanin died in 1927 without an heir. Seat Spiddal House, Galway, Residence 15 Great Cumberland Place, London W; Ferring Sussex. Michael Morris Lord Killanin bore arms: ermine, a fesse indented sable, in base a lion rampart of the last armed and langued gules. Crest - On a fasces fesswise proper, a lion's head erased argent, gutte de sang.
     Michael Morris, 3rd Baron Killanin, MBE, TD was an Irish journalist, author, sports official, the sixth president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). He was a member of one of the fourteen families making up the Tribes of Galway. He was educated at Eton College, the Sorbonne in Paris and then Magdalene College, Cambridge where he was President of renowned Footlights dramatic club. In the mid 1930s, he began his career as a journalist, working for the Daily Express the Daily Sketch and subsequently the Daily Mail. In 1937-1938, he was war correspondent during the Second Sino-Japanese War.
He served in World War II as a volunteer with the 12th (Queen's Westminsters) Battalion a territorial unit of the British Army where he was responsible for recruiting fellow journalists, and friends who were musicians and actors. He reached the rank of Major and took part in the planning of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy in 1944, acting as Brigade Major for the 30th Armoured Brigade, part of the 79th Armoured Division, receiving by the course of operations the Order of the British Empire. After being demobilized, he returned to Ireland.
In 1950, he became the head of the Olympic Council of Ireland, and became his country's representative in the IOC in 1952. He climbed up to senior vice-president in 1968, and succeeded Avery Brundage to the presidency of the IOC, being elected at the 73rd IOC Session in Munich, held prior to the 1972 Summer Olympics - between August 21st and August 24, 1972.
During his presidency, the Olympic movement experienced a difficult period, dealing with the financial flop of the 1976 Montréal Olympics and the boycotts of the 1980 Moscow Olympics. Seen from IOC's point of interest, worse decisions were taken. The cities of Lake Placid, New York and Los Angeles were 'chosen' for 1980 winter and 1984 summer games without any competing cities, resulting in a demanding position of the IOC - instead of a claiming one. He resigned after the Moscow Olympics in 1980, and his position was taken over by Juan Antonio Samaranch.
Lord Killanin was also a director of many companies and dabbled in the film industry, collaborating with his lifelong friend, John Ford, on "The Quiet Man". He also produced films, including The Playboy of the Western World and The Rising of the Moon.
He served as Honorary Consul-General of Monaco in Ireland from 1961 to 1984
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     Michael Morris Lord Killanin lived at 9 Lwr Mount Pleasant Ave, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, 1995.
     Michael died on 25 April 1999 in Dublin, Ireland, aged 84. He was buried in Galway, Galway. Following a bilingual funeral Mass at St Enda's Spiddal, County Galway, he was buried in the family vault in the New Cemetery, Galway.