Lydia Frances Phillips

(5 October 1830 - 29 October 1878)
Lydia Phillips (wife of R R S Bowker)
     The administration of her estate was granted To the next of kin of LYDIA PHILLIPS, late of Paterson River, in the colony of New South Wales,

Widow, deceased intestate as to her personal estate.

Greetings ?

WHEREAS It has been represented to us in our Supreme Court of New South Wales by the proctor of RICHARD RYTHER STEER BOWKER, of Newcastle, Doctor of Medicine, as attorney of LOUISA JANE SLOAN, Spinstor, a creditor of the said deceased, that the said LYDIA PHILLIPS departed this life on or about the twenty fourth day of November, in the year of Our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, intestate as to her personal estate: We do therofere peremptorily cito you and each of you to appear personally, or by your proctor duly constituted before our said Court, at the Court-house in King-street, Sydney, on or before the sixteenth day of June next, at the hour of 11 o'clock in theforonoon of the same day, then and there to accept or refuse Letters of administration of all and singular the goods and chattels of the said deceased, or to show cause, if you know any, why the same should not be committed to the said Richard Ryther Steer Bowker, as attorney of the said Louisa Jane Sloan, a creditor of tho said deceased.
Lydia Frances Phillips was born on 5 October 1830 in Paterson, New South Wales. She was the daughter of James Phillips and Lydia Ballard. Lydia Frances Phillips was christened on 23 November 1830 in Christ Church, Newcastle. Lydia Frances, daughter of James & Lydia Phillips of Middlehope, co. Durham, born October 5th.
     Lydia Frances Phillips married Richard Ryther Steer Bowker, son of Thomas Dawson Bowker and Elizabeth Steer, on 11 November 1858 in St Paul's, Paterson. Their marriage settlement was registered in book 59, no.11. The Trustees were given power to purchase land. It was dated November 10 1858, the day before his marriage.
     Lydia Frances Phillips received a letter from Elizabeth Stanser Robinson dated 23 July 1864. The letter mentions Mrs Best (who is spitting blood and very weak) and Mrs Giles, Captain & Mrs Ingles who are to join the depot of the Regiment in Ireland in the Autumn, Isabel & Charley Bowker, both their mothers, Mr, Mrs & Miss Bingle.
Mrs Best & Mrs Giles send their love
Fir Grove,
West Town nr Bristol
July 23, 1864
My dear cousin,
I intended writing by the Southern post? Mail but waited for the last day as I thought it possible the mail might be in that day, but on the 18th I was so poorly I could not write. We have not received any letters this time, we hope nothing serious has occurred to prevent your writing. I daresay you were occupied with your mother if the floods have permitted her to pay her long promised visit. How glad you would be to see her.
We trust all the children are well. Has Isabel seen her little brother Charley yet? I suppose she has returned home long ago.
I have not any news to send you, so I am afraid you will find this a very stupid epistle. We have had an extraordinarily fine warm summer, the heat has been very great and fears were entertained that there would be a serious want of water; especially in Bristol but we have had rain two days which has done good. More is wished for but it is very fine again today. My dear Mother felt the heat rather weakening but she is pretty well considering all things, and a day or two ago she was induced to go and drink tea with a kind friend of ours, a lady of 84 years of age who lives at the other end of the village, and who is very brisk and lively. My mother had not done such a thing for several years. Our roses have been beautiful this year, but the hot weather scortched (sic) many of the flowers. Her last months accounts from Mrs. Best were not very good; she spits blood so frequently and--she is very weak: she has some hopes that Captain and Mrs. Ingles may join the depot of the Regt. in the Autumn; it is in Ireland. George McNair took cold as soon as he returned to Scotland; we have not heard very lately how he is. And I can only give the same account of Mrs. Giles & Eleanor.
We hope your mother has derived benefit from her visit to you, if she has been able to make it. I suppose baby has been christened; admitted into the Good Shepherd's visible fold; may He guide & guard him and all your little ones, and bring them to His heavenly fold at last[?]. How is Richard now? Not overworking himself I hope. The winter is generally the busiest time for his profession. Your little ones must now be very amusing and must occupy a great deal of your time. Remember us very kindly to Miss Bingle and hope she is well, and Mr. & Mrs. Bingle also. Have you read The Graver Thoughts of a Country Parson? It was sent to me a short time ago & we like it very much. In another style I like "The Chronicles of the Schornberg Cotta Family: we are acquainted with the Mother and some other relations of the Authoress. I suppose all our best books find their way to Australia.
The long talked of suspension bridge from St Vincents Rocks across the Avon, is nearly completed, I will send you a photograph of it if I can get one by the time the next mail leaves. It is a very pretty object. In construction it is very like our old neighbour the Menai Bridge but the scenery around it is very different. I hope you received my letter by the last mail; I was obliged to trust it to a gentleman to post it for me at Bristol as I could not get the paper stamps at our village Post Office. I am glad the intention of doubling the postage between England and Australia was abandoned, so many poor people have friends there that it would have been cruelly felt by many. We hope we shall hear from you next month and receive a good account of all. My dear mother joins me in best love to Richard, yourself and your dear children & with every good wish, believe me my dear cousin,
Ever your affectionate, Elizabeth S Robinson
.
     Lydia Frances Phillips received a letter from Elizabeth Stanser Robinson dated 18 August 1864. Fir Grove, West Town, nr Bristol
August 18th 1864
My dear Cousin [to Lydia Phillips (Bowker)]
I shall not wait for the arrival of the Australian Mail before I write to you as I want to send you a photograph of the Suspension Bridge at Clifton. It makes a pretty picture: a much prettier one than I should. It has been talked of for so many years and the unfinished piers have stood looking reproachfully at the neighbouring city for nearly a quarter of century so that almost everyone had imagined that they would have become curiosities of unparalleled interest, mysterious …. For Macauley's celebrated new ... to speculate upon, but the bridge is erected at last and is to be opened to the public in October. It is hunger for a bridge which is now ... to Clifton. I have walked over it, and so has Richard I dare say, but now instead of spanning the ... it crosses the ... Sir Greville Smith of Ashton Hall gave £11,000 to enlarge it; I suppose he calculates that it will benefit his property; the shade of the Nightingale Valley will give place to showy villas and become the retreat of Bristol citizens instead of nightingales.
We hope the next mail will bring us a letter from you, as we did not hear last month; and we hope also that it will bring us good things of you all. Your little group of children must be a pretty sight now; their grandmama I am sure would be delighted to see them all together. I hope she was able to pay you her promised visit.
My dear mother has been complaining a little lately of feeling languid and also mother's rheumatic: but on the whole it is as one could expect: she has been out to call on some of our neighbours and she would in the garden.
I have been very poorly at times but am now better. This week many people are feeling weak; we have had a beautiful summer it is said to be 17 years since we have had such a warm dry one but it has it's draw backs the want of water is greatly felt: the poor cattle are in great want of grass and water. Many sheep having died in the Mendip Hills, if you have studied ... and Wordsworth the names of the Mendip and Cotswold hills will be familiar to you. In Bristol people are stunted to the supplying of water for one hour a day. I hope we shall have rain soon; but the sunshine and moonlight
I and some friends went to Chilvey Court a short time ago; once it was a noble place and had been fortified in the times of the Civil War; now half of it is pulled down and the farmer's family live in another part; and part of it left for the convenience or hosts of rats; but the curved balustrades, its fine doorways spoke of departed, and we ascended a remarkably fine staircase; often no doubt trodden by Lords and Ladies and dashing cavaliers but in the darkness and dust our crinolines gave a faint and ghostlike … of the … of long ago. But you are all so fresh and hew in Australia and do know what it is to sit beneath ivy covered walls and dream over the scenes they may have witnessed in the days of your; your province is of another kind.
For fear that you should be tired with my romancing, I will say farewell, with my dear mother's and my best love to yourself Richard and the dear children, and hope we may all meet in the White City with the gates of pearl, where ruin and decay, sorrow and death can never enter
I remain
My dear cousin
Ever yours affectionately
Elizth S Robinson
. Lydia Frances Phillips was the informant at the death of Lydia Ballard, on 24 November 1864.
     Lydia Frances Phillips received a letter from Lydia Amelia Lucy Sloan dated after 1866?. An undated letter (presumably after 1866 to Lydia Phillips/Bowker) from Ravenfield, Sep 11 - My very dear Aunt, I must not let Dolly close her letter without adding a few lines to thank you for your kind present of oranges which we have been enjoying, even baby has had some the mandarins. They are so delightfully sweet. I am going to preserve the ... tomorrow but .. ... I have been very busy making mourning? for the little ones. Dolly will have told you of the death of poor Mrs Healy. It is so ... and has cast a gloom over us all. She was such a nice kind old lady. I am sure you must be enjoying this delightful spring weather at dear old Paterson. ... ... I sent you my (carte?) I have had it taken seven times & this is the best of them all no one likes. My dearest love to you and Fannie, I remain dear Aunt, yours affectionately Lydia. I am deeply grived at what you say about John. My advice would be to make Mrs G?..... know that what she states is true. ... thoughtless .. not ... & wants a different home & companion I wish I had him here. Do not let Fannie hear this please. L A R.
.
     Lydia Frances Phillips received a letter from Richard Ryther Steer Bowker dated 14 January 1870. Newcastle, Jan 14th 1870
My dear Lydia
I hope you have such an instalment? of rain as we have now. It is very small fine rain but our paddocks looked very thirsty. At any rate I hope it has finished the intense heat which was greater than I remember to have ever felt in Australia before. I hear that several deaths have happened suddenly in Maitland & have been attributed to sun stroke among them, Clarke the dancing master & old Goodall the surveyor. I hope Robert & Charles took no harm from their wetting in the water hole. With all his faults I feel very fond of Robert. Indeed, I may say fond and proud of all of them. Robert is in many respects a fine and noble boy and my little Betha and her lemonade and anxiety to prepare it for me pleases me more and more. Isabella is not so demonstrative but still we have reason to be proud of them all and thankful to have such a fine set of children. You can scarcely tell how grateful and delighted I felt at your kind attentions as well as those of the children for I am not very demonstrative myself and yet it is my destiny to be gloomy and morose at times and I shall never be able to prevent it perhaps I make it up in the intensity of the affection and admiration which have for you and my great love which I feel (if I do not much express) for our children. I send some powders for little Richard to be taken night and morning until better.
I have just had a visit form Mrs Julia Walker, her husband & two children. Mr Walker seems a nice kind of person and the children are fine and strong. The boy 7 years of age as big as Robert or nearly so.
I had thought Mr Walker a rougher & worse bargain than he is. I think Mrs Walker has great reason to congratulate herself as to her husband.
Mr Peel had not been out on horseback, he complained that he had worn out ever so many pairs of trousers while riding. He is a curious mixture & I shall feel much more comfortable when Mr Hector is here instead of him. I notice the filly as you said very large. I hope she is not in foal when Isabella is old enough, she will carry her like the wind.
Yours very affectionately
R R S Bowker
.
     Lydia Frances Phillips in Darling Point, sent a letter dated between 30 June 1876 and 1878? To Elizabeth Steer Bowker. Avoca, June 30 - My dear Betha, I was glad to get your letter and hope by this your cold is much better. Your papa heard at Newcastle what a rough passage you had. You did not tell me how our old friends at Newcastle were or who took you to the convent school. I knew you would be shocked to see poor old Bona Vista, but it was even worse when I saw it during the dry weather. I forgot to give you the keys so that you may unpack the drawers in the wardrobe that I may have them sent down to Avoca. I am in a hurry to post this before 2 o'clock. Mr Hungerford was here this morning, he had a very bad cold, caught he thinks coming from Newcastle. Mrs H and the girls are not coming home until next week. Mrs Plunkett was here yesterday and exclaimed at baby's size, declares he is as big as her baby now. Mr Millard also called. He found Fanny in bed at Mr Windeyers with severe cold. He is coming to tea this evening. I thought he looked bery pale. Isabel went to see Fanny on Wednesday and she then had a cold and Issie said was very low spitited. As I have now a spare room I must ask her out for a few days. Mrs Bennet went back to Newcastle last night. We missed you & Lydia and the house seems empty. I have a nice girl as nurse, one who would like to be home & parlor maid and I thought Osmund's younger girl might do as nurse, but they won't come over, although the other children try to impose upon Emily the new nurse. Edward ran off just before dinner when she called him to dress and I had to whip him. They send him for bread & ... for them and all sorts of tricks. I must stop my scribble with much love to your young companions and Lydia & self. Hoping you are tidy, useful girls, Believe me, dear Betha, Your affectionate mother, L F Bowker. Do you play croquet? Your letter is not carefully written. If you come by N.C. try and get a cutting of the red rose, it belonged once to your grandmama Bowker & was given to me by Miss Bingle..
     Lydia Frances Phillips received a letter from Richard Ryther Steer Bowker dated 25 July 1877.
     Lydia Frances Phillips in 'Avoca', Darling Point, New South Wales, sent a letter dated 30 June 1878 to Elizabeth Steer Bowker. My dear Betha
I looked for your letter yesterday morning and your Papa was also surprised to hear how you had got up - it blew so hard after you left. I often thought of you all - tho Robert said it was a fair wind. You did not tell us if you were sick or how Edward's cold was or your throat. I fancy Harold legs must have ached the day after he arrived. Did he walk all the way? to be continued.
     Lydia Frances Phillips in Darling Point, sent a letter dated 12 July 1878 to Elizabeth Steer Bowker. 1878 July 12, Avoca - My dear Betha, I got Miss Wood to write to you last Wednesday as I was so busy - I went to the Chester ball, very low spirited and not feeling as if I should enjoy myself but I did more than I expected. Their decorations were very pretty - lots of pot plants in different places around the fountain. It was very lovely & the fountain was playing. The sides were all carpeted to walk on. The sides of the building were all enclosed for dressing rooms. Drawing room, card room and one side was for the supper. Two long tables & 2 across the end & another refreshment room had hot tea and coffee and ices going all the evening. Isabel looked very well and danced every dance. She wore white silk with white tarlatan over and silver flowers - pearls on her neck and arms, silver ferns in her hair and one white camellia. Mrs White's dress was the handsomest in the room, blue and silver worked into the silk. They say it cost £60. There were many blue and white dresses. They are Chester colours. I am sure you will be grieved to hear of Rosie Darley's death. I got a telegram from Mrs D on Tuesday saying Rosie died last night and thought she had made a mistake in the name - that it must be Tarsie?? Rose Scott was with her and wrote me full particulars. She was prepared to die and said goodbye, sending loving messages to all her friends & asking Dr King to do all he could to cure her sister, not to tell her she was gone for fear it would make her worse. I never had a greater shock. I was so fond of Rosie as everyone is. Poor Mrs Close, it is terrible for her and Mrs Darley. Your papa has had Charlie to come back in time for school on Monday - if it is fine tomorrow and you get this in time, come tomorrow afternoon and go up to Mrs Hudsons for tea. If the weather is not fair tomorrow to come on Monday afternoon, send what clothes are dirty by him and I can have them ready on Tuesday and take them bakck with me on Wednesday. I hope to get away on Wednesday night and go up to breakfast with Mrs Hudson so that Osmond needs to start his hi... to meet the mid day train and no Maud? says - Affie is still here, also Walter and he was going last night, but Affie made such a fuss about it. He is sorry now he waited as it is raining heavily. My love to all, hoping you are feeling well, believe me ever your affectionate mother, Lydia F Bowker..
     Lydia Frances Phillips in Darling Point, sent a letter dated 16 July 1878? To Elizabeth Steer Bowker. Avoca, July 16: My dear Betha, Charles arrived about half past seven o'clock this morning bringing his knapsack upon his shoulders - he had a good passage. I am sorry to hear you have a sore throat and hope it is better. If it should get very bade send a telegram tomorrow so that I may bring up medicines as it is I have asked your papa for a gargle. D V. I hope to get off tomorrow night and go on by the mid day train on Thursday. Affie, Ada & Walter left last night. I think Affie better though he can't swallow solid food yet. Your papa will see about a cask? and sasy Osmund had better buy if he thinks it sound enough as your papa likes old hay better than new, if it is quite sound and not musty - to buy what he thinks will be sufficient. I have plenty to do this morning so will say goodbye feeling thankful you escaped so easily your fall the other day. It is a warning to you to take more care. I made a pillow cast yesterday after sending your letter and must have them washed this morning. Give Lydia my love and thanks for her nice long letter. My love to you all, Your affectionate Mother L F Bowker, Tell Harold we all liked to read his first letter. You say the bullock weighed 7lbs and a half and the hay is 3 sh. a ton. You mean 7 cwt and a half and £3 a ton..
     Lydia died of typhoid fever on 29 October 1878 in Darling Point, New South Wales, aged 48. Her husband wrote in his diary My beloved Lydia leaves me - dies. She first had the mumps which she got from Ada Phillips at Bona Vista, then Erysipelas of the leg. Then overworked herself, got typhoid complicated with perforation and children all had mumps. She was buried on 30 October 1878 in St Paul's churchyard, Paterson. The body of Mrs R Bowker conveyed to Newcastle from Sydney per steamer to Maitland. Dr Bowker, his two sons, Messrs Dangar, Lewis and the Rev Hungerford accompanied the body which was afterwards taken to Morpeth in the steamer. Messrs C F Stokes, P Flemming, R Flemming, J Creer, T Brooks and J Hill of this city went to Morpeth, whence the body was taken by hearse to East Maitland and then onto Paterson via Pitnacree. Several residents of the district joined in the procession at Morpeth as did also R B Wallace and John Wood of this city. During yesterday flags were displayed at half mast by most of the vessels in the port, etc.

Children of Lydia Frances Phillips and Richard Ryther Steer Bowker

Elizabeth Steer Bowker

(19 October 1862 - 11 November 1945)
Elizabeth Steer Bowker (Betha, Lady Rich)
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker was commonly known as Betha. She was born on 19 October 1862 in Newcastle, New South Wales. She was the daughter of Richard Ryther Steer Bowker and Lydia Frances Phillips.
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker received a letter from Lydia Frances Phillips dated between 30 June 1876 and 1878?. Avoca, June 30 - My dear Betha, I was glad to get your letter and hope by this your cold is much better. Your papa heard at Newcastle what a rough passage you had. You did not tell me how our old friends at Newcastle were or who took you to the convent school. I knew you would be shocked to see poor old Bona Vista, but it was even worse when I saw it during the dry weather. I forgot to give you the keys so that you may unpack the drawers in the wardrobe that I may have them sent down to Avoca. I am in a hurry to post this before 2 o'clock. Mr Hungerford was here this morning, he had a very bad cold, caught he thinks coming from Newcastle. Mrs H and the girls are not coming home until next week. Mrs Plunkett was here yesterday and exclaimed at baby's size, declares he is as big as her baby now. Mr Millard also called. He found Fanny in bed at Mr Windeyers with severe cold. He is coming to tea this evening. I thought he looked bery pale. Isabel went to see Fanny on Wednesday and she then had a cold and Issie said was very low spitited. As I have now a spare room I must ask her out for a few days. Mrs Bennet went back to Newcastle last night. We missed you & Lydia and the house seems empty. I have a nice girl as nurse, one who would like to be home & parlor maid and I thought Osmund's younger girl might do as nurse, but they won't come over, although the other children try to impose upon Emily the new nurse. Edward ran off just before dinner when she called him to dress and I had to whip him. They send him for bread & ... for them and all sorts of tricks. I must stop my scribble with much love to your young companions and Lydia & self. Hoping you are tidy, useful girls, Believe me, dear Betha, Your affectionate mother, L F Bowker. Do you play croquet? Your letter is not carefully written. If you come by N.C. try and get a cutting of the red rose, it belonged once to your grandmama Bowker & was given to me by Miss Bingle..
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker received a letter from Lydia Frances Phillips dated 30 June 1878. My dear Betha
I looked for your letter yesterday morning and your Papa was also surprised to hear how you had got up - it blew so hard after you left. I often thought of you all - tho Robert said it was a fair wind. You did not tell us if you were sick or how Edward's cold was or your throat. I fancy Harold legs must have ached the day after he arrived. Did he walk all the way? to be continued.
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker received a letter from Lydia Frances Phillips dated 12 July 1878. 1878 July 12, Avoca - My dear Betha, I got Miss Wood to write to you last Wednesday as I was so busy - I went to the Chester ball, very low spirited and not feeling as if I should enjoy myself but I did more than I expected. Their decorations were very pretty - lots of pot plants in different places around the fountain. It was very lovely & the fountain was playing. The sides were all carpeted to walk on. The sides of the building were all enclosed for dressing rooms. Drawing room, card room and one side was for the supper. Two long tables & 2 across the end & another refreshment room had hot tea and coffee and ices going all the evening. Isabel looked very well and danced every dance. She wore white silk with white tarlatan over and silver flowers - pearls on her neck and arms, silver ferns in her hair and one white camellia. Mrs White's dress was the handsomest in the room, blue and silver worked into the silk. They say it cost £60. There were many blue and white dresses. They are Chester colours. I am sure you will be grieved to hear of Rosie Darley's death. I got a telegram from Mrs D on Tuesday saying Rosie died last night and thought she had made a mistake in the name - that it must be Tarsie?? Rose Scott was with her and wrote me full particulars. She was prepared to die and said goodbye, sending loving messages to all her friends & asking Dr King to do all he could to cure her sister, not to tell her she was gone for fear it would make her worse. I never had a greater shock. I was so fond of Rosie as everyone is. Poor Mrs Close, it is terrible for her and Mrs Darley. Your papa has had Charlie to come back in time for school on Monday - if it is fine tomorrow and you get this in time, come tomorrow afternoon and go up to Mrs Hudsons for tea. If the weather is not fair tomorrow to come on Monday afternoon, send what clothes are dirty by him and I can have them ready on Tuesday and take them bakck with me on Wednesday. I hope to get away on Wednesday night and go up to breakfast with Mrs Hudson so that Osmond needs to start his hi... to meet the mid day train and no Maud? says - Affie is still here, also Walter and he was going last night, but Affie made such a fuss about it. He is sorry now he waited as it is raining heavily. My love to all, hoping you are feeling well, believe me ever your affectionate mother, Lydia F Bowker..
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker received a letter from Lydia Frances Phillips dated 16 July 1878?. Avoca, July 16: My dear Betha, Charles arrived about half past seven o'clock this morning bringing his knapsack upon his shoulders - he had a good passage. I am sorry to hear you have a sore throat and hope it is better. If it should get very bade send a telegram tomorrow so that I may bring up medicines as it is I have asked your papa for a gargle. D V. I hope to get off tomorrow night and go on by the mid day train on Thursday. Affie, Ada & Walter left last night. I think Affie better though he can't swallow solid food yet. Your papa will see about a cask? and sasy Osmund had better buy if he thinks it sound enough as your papa likes old hay better than new, if it is quite sound and not musty - to buy what he thinks will be sufficient. I have plenty to do this morning so will say goodbye feeling thankful you escaped so easily your fall the other day. It is a warning to you to take more care. I made a pillow cast yesterday after sending your letter and must have them washed this morning. Give Lydia my love and thanks for her nice long letter. My love to you all, Your affectionate Mother L F Bowker, Tell Harold we all liked to read his first letter. You say the bullock weighed 7lbs and a half and the hay is 3 sh. a ton. You mean 7 cwt and a half and £3 a ton..
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker married George Edward Rich KCMG, PC, son of Rev Charles Hamor Rich and Isabella Tempest Bird, on 5 December 1894 in St Paul's, Paterson.
     Elizabeth and George were registered as George Rich, barrister at law, Bertha Steer Rich, domestic duties at Smith Street, Turramurra, on the 1903 electoral roll. Elizabeth Steer Bowker witnessed the probate of the estate of Richard Ryther Steer Bowker on 24 August 1903 in New South Wales; Duty on his estate was paid on 24 August 1903. The estate was valued at £18,260. At his death he owned land in Georgetown Rd, Georgetown comprising 2 parcels of 6 acres, 3 roods 4.5 perches and 2 roods 11.5 perches, being parts of Lot 1A of a partition of part of 35 acres of allotment 77 (portion 135 of parish). These lands were transferred in 1905 and 1907. Under a Torrens title he held (1) Vol.126 fol.74 in respect of 1 rood, part allotment 6 of sect.18 (Denison & Darvall Sts) at Onibyganba in the parish of Newcastle - transferred in 1918 to The Glazed Waterproof Tile Co. Ltd; (2) Vol.117 fol.33 - 1 rood, the residue of allotment 6 of section 18 (Denison St) also transferred in 1918 to the above (both in Carrington); (3) Vol.385 fol.70 - 16.75 perches, being Lot 1 Deposited plan 394 (Darlinghurst Rd) at Darlinghurst - transferred in 1908 to W C & A G Donovan; (4) Vol.96 fol.47 - 2 acres 1 rood - part of the Delamere estate (Yarrannabee Rd) at Darling Point - transferred in 2 parcels in 1913. 1904 Mar 16: Conveyance: executors of the will of R R S Bowker & R S Bowker as trustee re above settlement & children of settlors to Moses Smith of Lots 30, 31, 33-35 (Reg. book 757 no.637) Consideration £800. Lots 22, 24, 26-29 (Title vol.148 fol.17) were transferred (no.384656) same day from Robert Steer Bowker to Moses Paterson, auctioneer - consideration £1600. The land was in turn owned by Daphne Chloris Smith and her son Colin Smith.
     On 7 June 1967 the Registrar General replied to Dr. Ben Champion: In response to your letter dated 6th June, 1967, I ask that you please supply further particulars that will permit of the identification of Bona Vista and the trust deed to which you have referred.
     I might mention that an office copy of the will of Dr. Richard Ryther Steer Bowker was lodged in this Office in connection with Primary Application No. 13206 which resulted in the issue of Certificate of Title Volume 1551 Folio 63 in the names of his executors Robert Steer Bowker of Sydney, Physician, Charles Stanser Bowker of Dungog, Physician, Cedric Victor Bowker of Sydney, Physician, and Elizabeth Steer Rich, wife of George Edward Rich of Sydney, Barrister-at-law for land situated in Georgetown Road, Georgetown (then in the Municipal District of Waratah) and comprising two parcels of 6 acres 3 roods 41/2 perches and 2 roods 11 1/2 perches, being parts of Lot 1A of a partition of part of 35 acres Allotment 77 (Portion 135 of Parish). These lands were the subject of transfers in 1905 and 1907.
     In respect of lands held under Torrens Title, the executors (pursuant to Transmission Application No. 18297) became registered proprietors of the lands in Certificates of Title
(1) Volume 126 Folio 74 in respect of 1 rood part Allotment 6 of Section 18 (Denison & Darvall Streets) at Onibyganba in the Parish of Newcastle - transferred in 1918 to The Glazed Waterproof Tile Co. Limited;
(2) Volume 117 Folio 33 in respect of 1 rood, the residue of Allotment 6 of Section 18 (Denison Street) - also transferred in 1918 to The Glazed Waterproof Tile Co. Limited;
(3) Volume 385 Folio 70 in respect of 16 3/4 perches, being Lot 1 Deposited Plan 394 (Darlinghurst Road) at Darlinghurst transferred in 1908 to W.C. & A.G. Donovan;
(4) Volume 96 Folio 47 in respect of 2 acres 1 rood being part of the Delamere Estate (Yarrannabee Road) at Darling Point, transferred in two parcels in 1913. Estate duty was paid 24 August 1903.
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker and George Edward Rich KCMG, PC lived at 'Belton', 33 Mona Road, Darling Point, between 1909 and 1913.
     She was one of the founders of the Queens Club, Sydney.
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker and John Stanser Rich travelled to Naples, Italy, in 1914 per the "SS Otranto". They departed 25 February 1914.
     Elizabeth Steer Bowker and Lydia Tempest Rich travelled to Sydney, in 1914 per the "SS Maloja". They departed from London 14 Nov 1914. Jill became completely deaf in her teens and they travelled to Europe in 1914 in search of treatment, learning to lip read. Betha & Jill returned, Jack having joined the English Army.
     Elizabeth and George were registered as George Edward Rich, Justice of the High Court with Betha Steer Rich, home duties at 104 Elizabeth Bay Rd, Elizabeth Bay, Darlinghurst, on the 1930 electoral roll. As of 1932, Elizabeth Steer Bowker was also known as Lady Rich in records.
     The Women's Weekly reported in September 1933: Lady Rich evidently believes in keeping her family in touch with one another. Her old home, "Stanser," at Elizabeth Bay Road, was turned into flats when the different members en- tered into matrimony. Sir George and Lady Rich occupy the ground flat, their son George and his young wife have the top flat and Mrs. Ashby Hooper (Miss Jill Rich) has the bottom flat. Since last week the upper flats have been deserted, and everyone congre- gates at the Hoopers, for the attraction lies in the new son and grandson.
     Elizabeth died on 11 November 1945 in 'Stanser', 104 Elizabeth Bay Rd, Elizabeth Bay, New South Wales, aged 83. DEATH OF LADY RICH. SYDNEY. Monday.— Lady Rich, wife of Sir George Rich of the High Court, died to-day. She was a daughter of the late Mr. R. R. S. Bowker. M.L.C. She has left a daughter— Mrs. Ashby Hooper, of Toorak (V;)- and a son. Captain G. S. B. Rich. One son, Lt. J. S. Rich, was killed in action in 1915.
     Her will was proved on 5 March 1946 at New South Wales.

Children of Elizabeth Steer Bowker and George Edward Rich KCMG, PC

Lydia Tempest Rich

(21 December 1896 - 11 April 1988)
     Lydia Tempest Rich was commonly known as Jill. She was born on 21 December 1896 in 'Belwood', Turramurra, New South Wales. "Belwood" is at 12 King St, Turramurra and was auctioned 8 May 1982 being a "gracious family residence in spacious gardens" - 9/10ths of an acre. She was the daughter of George Edward Rich KCMG, PC and Elizabeth Steer Bowker.
     Lydia was educated at Ascham School, Sydney. She was confirmed on 24 September 1913 in St Mark's, Darling Point, New South Wales. She travelled with Elizabeth Steer Bowker and John Stanser Rich on the "SS Otranto".
     Lydia Tempest Rich and Elizabeth Steer Bowker travelled to Sydney, in 1914 per the "SS Maloja". They departed from London 14 Nov 1914. Jill became completely deaf in her teens and they travelled to Europe in 1914 in search of treatment, learning to lip read. Betha & Jill returned, Jack having joined the English Army.
     We have her prayer book inscribed "Lydia T Rich from her loving grannie 22 Dec 1917" - the day after her 21st birthday.
     Lydia Tempest Rich married Ashby Arthur William Hooper, son of Arthur Frederick Hooper and Fannie Madeline Elma Dempster, on 14 April 1924 in St Paul's College chapel, Sydney University. HOOPER-RICH. The marriage was celebrated on April 14 of Lydia Tempest Rich, only daughter of Mr. Justice and Mrs. Rich, of Elizabeth Bay, to Ashby A. W. Hooper, elder son of Mr. A. F. Hooper, of Toorak, Melbourne. The Rev. A. H. Garnsey officiated. The bride, who was given away by her father, was gowned in silver cloth satin with a court train lined with silver not and trimmed with diamond buckles. Tho bridesmaid, Miss M. P. Rolln, wore maize beaded Georgette. Mr. Frank Richardson (Geelong) acted as best man. The reception was held at the Royal Sydney Golf Club, where Mrs. Rich received the guests. The bride travelled in dark embroldcicd morocaln, and wore a toque to match.      
Jill Rich and Ashby Arthur William Hooper moved to Switzerland departing August 1925. Ashby had taken a position with Brown Boveri in Baden, Switzerland.
     Jill Rich and Ashby Arthur William Hooper lived at Baden, Switzerland, from November 1925 to 1928. His sister Margot joined them.
     Lydia Tempest Rich and Ashby Arthur William Hooper were on the passenger list of the "Oronsay", arriving at Fremantle, Western Australia, on 5 March 1928. The departed London on 4 Feb 1928, via Toulon to Sydney.
     She was a member of the Queens Club Sydney, resigning in 5 Oct 1976.      
Lydia Tempest Rich and Ashby Arthur William Hooper moved to Melbourne, Victoria, in 1934 per the "Westralia".
     Lydia and Ashby were registered at 11 Douglas St, Toorak, on the between 1934 and 1936 electoral roll.
     Jill Rich and Ashby Arthur William Hooper lived at 31 Montalto Avenue, Toorak, from 1937 to 1957.
     Elected as member of the Alexandra Club, Melbourne on 13 Oct 1949.
     Lydia Tempest Rich received a letter from Charles Ellison Rich dated 18 December 1956. A letter addressed from 3 Kingston House, London SW7 mentions the visit of Joan Rich (Grimwade) to London, Colin and his family at St Anton for winter sports, Martin in South Africa.
     Lydia Tempest Rich lived at 115 Canterbury Rd, Toorak, Victoria, from c. 1960 to 1985.
     Lydia Tempest Rich lived at 32a Coppin Grove, Hawthorn, Victoria, from 1985.
     Lydia died on 11 April 1988 in the Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Victoria, aged 91. She was living at 32a Coppin Grove, Hawthorn at the time. She was cremated in April 1988 in The Necropolis, Springvale. Her ashes were placed in the Dempster family grave at Kew Cemetery along with her husband on 21 April 1988.
     Her will was proved on 17 August 1988 at Victoria. She was described as having blood type B+, blue eyes and went grey in her twenties.

Child of Lydia Tempest Rich and Ashby Arthur William Hooper