Elizabeth Frances Steer

(September 1818 - 10 February 1852)
     Elizabeth Frances Steer was born in September 1818 in Doncaster, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Lt Robert Popplewell Steer and Elizabeth Denny.
     Elizabeth Frances Steer was mentioned in a deed dated 18 November 1844. Correspondence re terms of settlement on proposed marriage of Miss Steer with J D Hilton 1844. Also - Release by Eleanor Frances daughter of R P Steer deceased, of arrears of annuity under will of W P B Johnson 18 Nov 1844.
     Elizabeth Frances Steer married Rev John Denne Hilton, son of Rev John Hilton and Mary Elizabeth Denne, on 9 December 1844 in Scarborough, Yorkshire.
     Elizabeth Frances Steer and Rev John Denne Hilton were recorded on the 1851 census in 10 Croft, Hastings, St Clement, Sussex. John Denne Hilton, aged 30, perpetual curate of Ch Ch ..., born Wingham Kent, Elizabeth F wife, aged 32, born Doncaster, Yks, Elizabeth Steer, mother in law, aged 70, annuitant, born Ireland, John W D Hilton, son, 13. born Southampton, Hants, Elizabeth M G, daughter 3, born Blackdown, Dorset, Arthur G D son 1, born Clevedon, Somerset, Robert R P, son, 8 months, born Belton, Lincoln with four servants.
     Elizabeth died on 10 February 1852 in Belton, Lincolnshire, aged 33. She was buried after 10 February 1852 in Belton. Memorial - her husband's remains below his wife who died 10 Feb 1852!

Children of Elizabeth Frances Steer and Rev John Denne Hilton

Rev John Denne Hilton

(18 June 1820 - 6 October 1853)
     Rev John Denne Hilton was born on 18 June 1820 in Wingham, Kent. He was the son of Rev. John Hilton of Sarre Crt, Isle of Thanet, Kent & his wife Mary Elizabeth (born c 1791, bur 3 May 1866 aged 75 at Wade). BA clerk. He was the son of Rev John Hilton and Mary Elizabeth Denne. Rev John Denne Hilton was christened on 3 July 1820 in Wingham, Kent.
     John matriculated at University College, Oxford University. John was a perpetual curate.
     Rev John Denne Hilton appeared on the 1841 census.
     Rev John Denne Hilton married Elizabeth Frances Steer, daughter of Lt Robert Popplewell Steer and Elizabeth Denny, on 9 December 1844 in Scarborough, Yorkshire.
     Rev John Denne Hilton and Elizabeth Frances Steer were recorded on the 1851 census in 10 Croft, Hastings, St Clement, Sussex. John Denne Hilton, aged 30, perpetual curate of Ch Ch ..., born Wingham Kent, Elizabeth F wife, aged 32, born Doncaster, Yks, Elizabeth Steer, mother in law, aged 70, annuitant, born Ireland, John W D Hilton, son, 13. born Southampton, Hants, Elizabeth M G, daughter 3, born Blackdown, Dorset, Arthur G D son 1, born Clevedon, Somerset, Robert R P, son, 8 months, born Belton, Lincoln with four servants.
     Rev John Denne Hilton made a will dated 30 August 1852 in Temple Belwood, Belton. This is the last will and testament of me John Denne Hilton of Temple Belwood in the parish of Belton.
     John died on 6 October 1853 in Bordeaux, France, aged 33. He was buried on 8 October 1853 in Belton, Lincolnshire.
     His will was proved on 28 January 1854 at the Prerogative Court of Canterbury.

Children of Rev John Denne Hilton and Elizabeth Frances Steer

James Ryther

(before May 1543 - 30 December 1595 or September 1596)
     James Ryther was born before May 1543 in Canterbury, Kent. He was aged 23 in May 1566, when his mother was declared a lunatic. However he was aged 26.5 in 1558/9. He was nearly 30 when he succeeded his father in 1563. In the 1585 visitation, he stated that he was the son of Wm and Mary. He was the son of William Ryther and Mary Hales.
     James Ryther lived at Northamptonshire. He wrote that he had been brought up in Northamptonshire and it is likely that he would have been attached to one of the gentry or noble families.
     In William Ryther's will dated 5 January 1558/59 in Harewood, Yorkshire, James Ryther was named as heir; His only son James was to be the sole executor & beneficiary.
     On 17 June 1563, four months after his father's death, by bill of the Court of Wards, James was licensed to enter upon his estates and he moved to Harwood. He was an executor of William Ryther's estate on 11 July 1565 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury.
     Mary Ryder, widow, lunatic: Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 9 May 1566, before Richard Champion, knight, mayor & escheator, to enquire as to the lunacy of Mary Ryder, widow, late the wife of William Ryder, esq., who died in co. York, by the oath of Thomas Litton, John Hatton, Henry Sutton, Richard Henman, Stephen Walden, William Smithe, John Noble, Arthur Ravenscroft, Robert Dickenson, Robert Crips, Michael Smythe, Walter Browne, Richard Smyth, Henry Shawe, John Harrison, and Anthony Garret, who say that: Mary Ryder from the last day of June 6 Edw VI [1552] up to the day of taking the inquisition has been a lunatic, and incapable of governing herself or her lands, goods, etc. She does not enjoy lucid intervals, but before the said last day of June she was in her right mind.
The said Mary Ryder has no lands within the city of London to the knowledge of the said jurors. James Ryder is the next heir of the said Mary, and is now aged 23 years and more
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     James Ryther married Elizabeth Atherton, daughter of William Atherton, before 1570. He had 6 children by 1577. There are no marriage records extant at Bardsey 1568-1577.
Between 1571 and 1583 James Ryther purchased property in Harewood, between 1571 and 1583.
     In Hilary Tern 1571/2 James Ryther sold to Anthony Maude & Cecilia his wife.... lands in Dunkeswell..
In 1571/72 James Ryther sold property in Dunkeswick, Yorkshire. Hilary Term, Fine between Anthony Mawde, gent and Cicely his wife, plaintiffs, and James Ryther esq., deforciant, of a messuage, a toft, a barn, a garden, an orchard, 20 acres of land, 40 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 10 acres of wood, 30 acres of furze and heath, 20 acres of turbary, 20 acres of moss, and common pasture for all animals, in Dunkeswycke, which Dame Anne Browne, widow, holds for life: to hold after the death of Anne, to Anthony & Cicely and the heirs of Cicely.
In 1574/75 James Ryther purchased property in Harewood, in 1574/75. Hilary Term:|James Ryther & William Plumpton Esqs., plaintiffs, Matthew Redman esq. & William Redman, gent. re 20 messuages and 20 cottages with lands in Harwoodde, Hetherycke, Werdeley and Dunkeswicke, also the moiety of the manor of Harwood.
     Depositions taken 20-22 June 17th Eliz (1575) re Harwood castle and park plus interagatories on behalf of James Ryther complainant against Mathew Redman, Richard Travers, John Pleasington & William Ancland?.
     Bill of Complaint in the Star Chamber of James Ryther and William Plumpton re the purchase of the Redman moiety of Harewood.
     The Queen v. ?: Purchase of the manor and castle of Harwoode, whether the money was lent at usury between James Rither and Willm. Readman: York 19 Eliz (1577).
     Counterpart of an indenture dated 13 May [1577]: 2. Francys Gascoigne of Gawthorpe esq. William Plompton of Plompton esq. James Ryther of Harwood esq. Bryan Palmes of Naburne esq. Richard Gascoigne of Lasyngcrofte esq. Christopher Mather of Seacrofte esq. John Ellys of Bardsey gent. Mathew More of Awstroppe gent. Richard Greene of Whitkirke gent. Henry Norton of Secrofte gent. Thomas Leedes of Leade [?] gent. Robert Oglethorpe of Bardsey gent. Bryan Askwithe of Osgodby gent. Owen Ragesdale of Headley gent. William Oglethorpe of Oglethorpe gent. John Gascoigne of Parlyngton gent. John Laundere of Heyworthe [...] gen Nicholas Scargill of Doncaster gent. William Oglethorpe of Roundhay gent. and Robert Cloughe of Rygton gent.
     Counterpart of an indenture made between 1. John Conyers of London esq. 2. Francys Gascoigne of Gawthorpe esq. William Plompton of Plompton esq. James Ryther of Harwood esq. Bryan Palmes of Naburne esq. Richard Gascoigne of Lasyngcrofte esq. Christopher Mather of Seacrofte esq. John Ellys of Bardsey gent. Mathew More of Awstroppe gent. Richard Greene of Whitkirke gent. Hnery Norton of Secrofte gent. Thomas Leedes of Leade [?] gent. Robert Oglethorpe of Bardsey gent. Bryan Askwithe of Osgodby gent. Owen Ragesdale of Headley gent. William Oglethorpe of Oglethorpe gent. John Gascoigne of Parlyngton gent. John Laundere of Heyworthe gen Nicholas Scargill of Doncaster gent. William Oglethorpe of Roundhay gent. and Robert Cloughe of Rygton gent.
Reciting that Lady Margaret Gascoigne widow of Sir John Gascoigne of Cardington co. Bedford, by deed dated 28 August 16 Eliz [1574] gave to John Russell gent. and John Aylford alias Tailour of Cardington, yeoman, an annuity of £10 issuing out of Thorpestapleton manor, (after her death) payable at the feasts of St. Michael the archangel and the Annunciation (with distress clause), to be paid by them to the Parson and Churchwardens of Whitechurch or Whytkirke to be indifferently distributed by them to the poor of Whitkirk according to their needs. The lands at that time being leased to John Barstowe and Dorothy Scargill widow, the rent could not be levied, but now the reversion of the manor of Thorpestapleton had passed to John Conyers, who was desirous of observing Lady Margater's intention
And reciting that there was reserved and payable for the said manor upon the lease the yearly rent of £42. 15s. 0d.
John Conyers, in full satisfaction of all arrears, granted to (2) the sum of £10 to be paid annually out of the yearly rent of £42. 15s. 0d. to the use of the poor as afordsaid.
Signed and sealed by the feoffees - red wax seals on tags.
     James Ryther, in common with other landowners of the day, was seeking to turn to his own advantage the legislation which favoured the enclosure of waste land. Litigation records show that in the course of 1579-1580 Ryther bought a case relating to common rights against one Robert Hopwood and others before the Star Chamber. Only Ryther's Bill of complaint survives, but Hopwood's name occurs again the next case and the two may be part of a single episode. The second case reputed in August 1580, sparked off by Ryther's enclosing "one parcel of ground lately called the Long Wood and now called the Spring'. In that month Thomas Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse, husband of Margaret Gascoigne, heiress to the manor of Gawthorpe which adjoined Harewood, supported by Robert Hopwood and 25 others assembled "in riotous manner" and pulled or cut down Ryther's enclosing hedge and turned their cattle into the place. Ryther brought proceedings, which lasted from June 1581 to September 1582, but the results are unclear.
In 1580/81 James Ryther purchased property in Yorkshire, in 1580/81. Hilary Term 23 Eliz. Plaintiffs: John Manners, esq., James Ryther, esq., Edward Herne, esq. John Woolmer, gent., and Richard Barnard, gent; John Freston, gent, deforciant; re 20 messuages with lands in Altofts, Normanton, Warmefeild, Kirkethorpe, Heath, Sandall, Wakefield, Sharleston, Pountfrett, Fetherston, Acton, Ferryfreston, Brotherton, Knottingley, Ferrybrigge and Madley.
     One of the experts called in an enquiry into Dover Haven in 1581 was James Ryther.
     Thomas Wentworth, armiger, won a defamation case against James Ryther, armiger, between Jan & August 1582. James was admitted to Gray's Inn in February 1581/82, London.
     James was a plaintiff in a civil court case in February 1581/82 in London. 1581-2: Bill of complaint in the Star Chamber of James Rither of London, Esq. administrator of the goods and chattels of William Atherton of Harewood, gent, deceased, during the nonage of Robert & John Rither, the plaintiff's sons, executors appointed by William Atherton's will. Atherton in his lifetime delivered to Anthony Mawde of Helthwayhill £100 to be safely kept for Atherton's use, and to be paid to him or his assigns on demand, and by his will gave all his goods, etc. not otherwise bequeathed (and therefore including the £100) to the said Robert & John Rither, and made them executors. John has since died, but Robert is alive and still under 21. The plaintiff, as adminstrator, demanded the £100, but Mawde refused to repay it. The plaintiff, about two years ago, complained before the Council of the North at York, when Mawde appeared, and falsely swore that the £100 was a gift. He asked for a supoena against Mawde for perjury. Mawde demurred, on the ground that the cause of complaint arose before the Council of York, and could therefore be best tried there..
     James Ryther mortgaged property on 8 May 1584. James mortgaged his property to secure a debt to Hugh Hare which led to a long series of disputes and eventually being jailed for debt.
     Of Harewood Castle, Esquire of the Body to Queen Elizabeth, living 1585.
Lord of Harewood 1563. His son Robert was Lord of Harewood 1596 and an inquisition showed him living there in 1595 aged 21.
Jones stated: The last two inhabitants of the Castle were James Rither and his son & heir Robert Ryther. James was born in 1536. He was an Esquire of the Body to Queen Elizabeth, and a warm and attached friend to Lord Burghley, the celebrated statesman. Reproduces letters from Harewood Castle from 1587-1591 respecting the incursions of the Scots, the base ingrossing of corn in at York & Hull, re Mr Bellasis to be Justice of the Peace as too weak for military service, the increases in alehouses in Yorkshire.
He was described by the son of his neighbour Thomas Wentworth: "But his proud overweening condition, albeit he had especial good gifts of nature, brought him to die in the Fleet for debt and his son ... to sell his inheritance...".
     He supplied information about his family to Glover at his Heraldic Visitation in 1585. His son Robert was mentioned as aged 14.      
James Ryther was the Member of Parliament.
b. 1536, o.s. of William Ryther of Canterbury, Kent, and Harewood by Mary, da. of Sir James Hales, l.c.j. common pleas. m. c.1570, Elizabeth, da. and coh. of William Atherton of Harewood, 2s. 5da. suc. fa. 1563.
Offices Held J.P. Yorks. (W. Riding) by 1587, q. 1595.1
Biography
By his own account Ryther was born in Kent and brought up in Northamptonshire. In 1563 he succeeded to the moiety of the manor and castle of Harewood which his father had inherited on the death of a distant cousin, and eventually moved back to Yorkshire. He was descended from Thomas, son of Sir Thomas Ryther (or Ryder) of Ryther in the West Riding, and related through the descendants of Thomas’s brother Sir Ralph to the Constables of Flamborough and the Ashes of Aughton, who in turn were related to the Cliffords, earls of Cumberland, the nominal patrons of the borough of Appleby. That he owed his election directly to his kinship with the 3rd Earl is not unlikely, but he was also known to several members of the Russell family and to Lord Burghley.2
In a short sequence of letters beginning in 1587 when he had lived in Yorkshire for 20 years and was one of its justices of the peace, Ryther described to Burghley the condition of the county and the district around Kendal. York was very badly governed; the poor committed great disorders which might be prevented if gentlemen were forbidden to dismiss their servants; there was too much engrossing of corn; the number of alehouses had increased because the justices’ clerks were making money out of licensing them; the justices were inadequate and too few; and the common people, though courteous and tractable, were attached to custom and not readily disposed to accept the high authority of Parliament; the only northern gentleman worthy of his calling was the Earl of Cumberland; the further north one went, ‘the less the truth’; the borderers sold horses to our ‘back friends’ the Scots; Scottish faults were spreading into England, and so on. In one letter, dated 7 Apr. 1588 but endorsed 7 Apr. 1589, he enjoins Burghley to bear with Christian fortitude the death of the ‘late weak lady’ who had been lent to him by divine providence for longer than human reason could have expected. Though always respectful, these letters from Ryther to Burghley seem to claim a degree of acquaintance bordering on the familiar; they suggest that Burghley had known him for some years, as indeed he would have done if, as has been asserted, Ryther had been an esquire of the body to the Queen as his father had been to Queen Mary.
3
A very different picture of Ryther was given by Archbishop Sandys in his report of September 1587 on Yorkshire justices. To the archbishop he was ‘a sour and subtle papist’, who had been put into the commission for that very reason, ‘ready to hinder any matter that shall touch any papist’, ‘a man unprofitable for the commonwealth and full of contention’, dependent on
Sir Thomas Fairfax ‘to make good his evil causes’. To another he was ‘a man profoundly studied in Macchiavelli’. He remained in the commission, but his unpopularity in the county contributed to a curious change in his fortunes. In January 1592 he was petitioning Burghley, ‘his singular good lord and patron’, to secure his release from Newgate, whither he had been sent by order of the court of wards because of a debt to the Queen which he claimed he had paid. It was being said of him that he was ‘a troublesome man’ to the gentlemen of the county, which was untrue, and that ‘I will pay no man his due, a thing far from me’. He was ‘a gentleman not meanly descended, a poor servant to her Majesty’, to whom he had given good service in his county and who had promised to protect him. As for the allegation that he was at variance with the Fairfaxes, the fact was that he was very closely tied to them by blood and friendship. The end of this affair is not known.4
By mid-July 1594 he was a prisoner again, this time in the Fleet. The Countess of Cumberland, writing to an unnamed correspondent, begged him to move Sir Robert Cecil on Ryther’s behalf; she herself had spoken in his favour to the Queen. He was still confined on 17 Dec., when Stanwardine Passy, servant to the keeper of the Gatehouse, reported in French to
Richard Topcliffe that there was ‘no news but a letter from Mr. Ryder in the Fleet’. A later letter, to Archibald Douglas, the Scotch ambassador in England, from ‘you know who’, tells more: ‘Mr. Rydder was loosed out of prison yesternight and is to be troubled with strait watching which hinders all his business’. The writer had given him £80 and had agreed ‘to pleasure’ him with £65 more.5
Ryther died 4 Sept. 1595. Four years after his death his heir was compelled to sell Harewood to pay his debts.
6
Ref Volumes: 1558-1603
Authors: Irene Cassidy / E.L.C.M.
in 1586 for Appleby, Westmorland.
     James Ryther was mentioned in September 1587 in Harewood, In Sep 1587 the Edwin Sandys, Archbishop of York told Lord Burghley that James Ryther of Harewood, a J.P. was a soure, subtil papist, and brought into commission [of the Peace] in respect thereof. Ready to hinder any matter that shall touch any papist. He dependeth upon Sir Thomas Fairfax [of Denton] to make good his evil causes. Wentworth and Ryther were both considered to be Sir Thomas Fairfax's 'men'. In 1588 James wrote a description of Yorkshire among his letters to Lord Burghley.
     James Rither's complained to Lord Burghley of the great increase of Ale-houses in Yorkshire. Another undated paper outlined Mr James Rither's scheme for a free school and relief of the poor, in the parish & manor of Harwood, Yks.
     James Ryther in Harewood, sent a letter dated 17 July 1588. From Mr Rither, 1588 Ag: ye Scots, to the right honorable, my very good Lord the Lord High Treasure of England: .... My Lord, I was born in Kent, brought up in Northamptonshire, dwell now in Yorkshire and am often conversant with the people of Kendall .... Jame Rither, Harwoood xvij July 1588.
     James Ryther sent a letter dated 4 January 1591. James Rither, in Newgate to Lord Burghley, that he is thrown into that vile prisn for a debt to the Queen that he has already paid.
     On 14 October 1591 he attested: I, James Ryther of Harwood Castell, in the county of York, Esquire, have caused this discent of kindred to be sett downe according to myne owne knowledge and view of writing, with other matters of evidences; also by credible reports of auncient men, to be true, in maner and forme as abovesaid; and that Wiliam Ryther, gentleman, now Sheriff of London, is descended from my auncestor Sr Wm Ryrher, of Ryther, in the county of Yorke, Kt., in maner and forme as is above sett downe. In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale, the 14 day of October in the year of our Lord 1591 - by me James Rither. He was imprisoned from Jan 1591/2 in Fleet Prison & Newgate, London. January 4 1591/2: He writes to Lord Burghley "his singular good lord and patron" from Newgate, stating that he has been thrown in there by order of the court of wards for a debt to the Queen which he claimed to have paid. It was being said of him that he was "a troublesome man" to the gentlemen of the county, which was untrue, an that "I will pay no man his due, a thing far from me". He was a gentleman not meanly descended, a poor servant to her Majesty", to whom he had given good service in his county and had promised to protect him. As for the allegation that he was at variants with the Fairfaxes, the fact was that he was very closely tied to them by blood and friendship. The end of this affair is not known. On the 17th of the same month he wrote again begging that his accusers may be brought to justice.
25 June 1592. James Ryther from the Fleet to John Tamworth re sending money.
By mid July 1594 he was a prisoner again, this time in the Fleet. The Countess of Cumberland, writing to an unnamed correspondent, begged him to move Sir Robert Cecil on Ryther's behalf; she herself had spoken in his favour to the Queen. He was still confined on 17 December when Stanwardine Passy, servant to the Keeper of the Gatehouse, reported in French to Richard Topcliffe that there was "no news but a letter from Mr Ryder in the Fleet". A later letter, to Archibald Douglas, the Scotch ambassador in England, from "you know who", tells more: "Mr Rydder was loosed out of prison yesternight and is to be troubled with strait watching which hinders all his business". The writer had given him £80 and had agreed "to pleasure" him with £65 more.
     The Castle was eventually, on 11 April 1593, occupied by Hare's men, but only after a clash between 30 & 40 on either side. Bows and arrows, guns and stones, armour, shot and munition were called into use. One of Ryther's men was killed and John Savile himself was "struck on the breast with an arrow shot out of a bow by a very strong archer to the great peril of the loss of his life". The defence, if it is the right term, was headed by James' son Robert Ryther, supported by a faithful servant Ralphe Conystone. Robert was conspicuous by his violent language, saying that if any durst approach he "would make hold in their flesh and kill them and hang their skins on the hedge".
     Countess of Cumberland to —.
Begging him Lo move Sir Robert Cecil on behalf of Mr. Ryther, a prisoner in the Fleet that “law may be granted him.” Moved her Majesty on the man's behalf when she was at Court upon Sunday was sevennight.—Bedford House, 15 July, 1594
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     James died on 30 December 1595 or September 1596 in London?. James Ryther died the last day of September 38 Elizabeth; Harewood descended to Robert Ryther his son & heir who sold the property to Thomas Wentworth in 1601. Memorial at Harewood?
Four years after his death his heir was compelled to sell Harewood to pay his debts. He was buried on 5 January 1595/96 in the churchyard of St Bride's, Fleet Street, London.
     James Ryther was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held in Leeds, Yorkshire, on 4 September 1596. His son Robert was shown as aged 21 in 38 Eliz (1596) living at Harewood.
     Plaintiffs: Robert Ryther and Ralph Conyston. Defendants: John Savill and Hugh Hare. Respecting a demise by James Ryther deceased, father of plaintiff Robert Ryther, to defendant Hugh Hare, of the manor of Harwood [Harewood], or lands in Harwood [Harewood] and Stockton, Yorkshire..
     The administration of his estate was granted to Robert Ryther on 8 May 1604 at PCC. Jas Rither, St Bride, Fleet St London, to Robert Ryther son.
     Right Hon. Margaret Countess Dowager of Cumberland. v. John Wood: Lands in the manor of Harwood and Stockton, conveyed by Jas. Ryther to Albany Butler, two parts whereof were seized by Crown for recusancy of the latter; granted by Queen Elizabeth to John Dumbwell, and since bought by plaintiff of Albany. James Ryther was mentioned in a deed dated 1606/7. Michaellmas Term. In a memorandum in the Exchequer the fifth year of the now King James [1606/7] that is to say amongst the Records of Michaelmass Terme role in the Exchequer out of the part of the Treasury Remembrancer remaines agmongst other records thereis contained that is to say as follows: York - Memorandum that because John Ryther late cofferer of the late King Edwarde the sixt who dyed as it was reported owed to our soveraign Lord the King the day wherein he dyed in the soum of four hundred & sixty eight pounds tenn shillings, be by himself received from the late court of Augmentations in performance toward the provision charges and expendses of the same house, by virtue of a warrant of the deceased King dated under the seal of the said late King Edward the sixt the seventh day of March in the third year of his regine of severall of his debts and truely which sums afsd are not as yett payed to our said Lord the King as in the Exchequer here appeared by records, Therefore it was commanded to the Sheriff of the county of the said York by the writt of our now said soverainge Lord King James of the said Exchequer dated at Westminster the second day of Jan in the year of his Rainge of England France & Ireland & the fourt of Scotland the thirtieth nine the he should not fail etc. that as will by thie oath of honest & lawfull men etc. who by allways means & measures which by the bietter etc. diligently they inquire in what day and yeare where the said John Ryther dyed or what all his goods & chattels & what value the same John had in his balliwick afsd the day which he dyed & to which or whose hands the same goods & goods & chattesl after the death of the said John came to ... he shall take into the hands of our said Lord the King to the value of the afsd debt, & afterwards hee shall ... that debt soe that he ought to have the moneys before these Barrons from holy Trinitie day in fifteen days for the said our Lord the King now, than there to be payed in the same place ... Timothy Hutton kt, late sheriff of the sd co. sd writt to him in the premisses directed & commanded by the indorsement of the same writt that hee by virtue of that writt to him directed the five & twentieth day of June the afsd yeare tooke into the hands of our sd Lord the King the mannor, messuage, lands and temenements in a certain inquisition annext to the sd writt as it was ordered to the same sheriff & commanded further that the residue of the execution of that writt afsd writ taken at the Castle of York upon Monday the three & twentieth day of June in the year Jas 4 ...
It was found that the said John Ryther was named seized in his demean as of fee of and in the mannor of Harwood with the appurtenances and of & in divers lands & tenements pertaining to the same mannor of the yearly value in all consisted beyond preissalls of fourty pounds wich trul was returned by the said Barrons, Here may be seen and understood, It was agreed amongst the same Barrons that the foresead manor of Harwood with the appurtenances should now remain in the hands of our now said Lord the King till what time etcetera And notwithstanding now that is to say the third day of November in this terme here came a certaine man called Thomas Wentworth gentleman son and heir apparent of William Wentworth Esq possessing the foresaid manor with all its appurtances in his proper person & desires the report of the fsd writt & the retorn of the same as also of the fsd inquisition & they are read to him, the which being read & by him heard & understood the same Thomas demaunds the fsd manor with its appurtenances in the hands of our afsd Lord the King that now is ...
Yet for his plea he says that long before the said John Ryther in the afsd writt named became debtor to our said Lord the King Edward 6 of 468 pounds tenn shillings and nine pence one Henry Ryther was seized in his demeane as of fee tail of and in a moietie of the same mannor of Harwood with the appurtenances as it is contained in the fourth part of the Original of the thirtieth five year of the late King Henry the eight role the thirtieth four & one Richard Redman was likewise seized in his demeans as of the fee of and in another moietie of the same Mannor of Harwood with the appurtuenaces as is contained in a memorandum of the three & thirtieth years of the said late King Henry * in Easter term recorded in the fift role & they set separately there of remained seized Afterwards that is to say the fift day of January in the year of the Raigne of the fsd Henry 8 the five & thirtieth the said Henry Ryther dyed seized of the said moietie of him the said Henry of the said mannor, after whose death the same moietie of the afsd mannor descended to William Ryther as cousin & next heir male of the same Henry Ryther, by virtue of which the same William Ryther entered into the same moietie of the afsd mannor with its appurtenances & was seized there of as in his demean of fee in tailed & the same William soe thereof remeined seized Afterwards that is to say the fift day of February Eliz 5 (1563) the same William Ryther dyed so seized after whose death the same moitie of the afsd mannor descended to one James Ryther as son & heir of the sd William Ryther ... And the fsd Richard Redman as it appeareth in forme afds remaining seized in the other afsd moitie ... Afterwards 29 Jan Hen 8 the 25 the same Richard Redman died soe seized after whose death the same other moietie of the manor descended to one Matthew Redman as son & next heir of Richard. ... Afterwards a certain fine was levied ... between James Ryther & one William Plumton Esq. plaintiffs & the afsd Matthew Redman & one William Redman deforciants (amongst others) of the afsd other moietie of the afsd manor of Harwood ... that Matthew & William Redman should recognise the afsd moietie with the appurtenances to be the right of the said James: as they which the same James & William Plumpton had of the gift of the afsd Matthew & William Redman & their lawful heirs afsd unto James & William Plumton the the heirs of him the same James forever as by the fine afsd (amongst others) doth most pl ... appear, Which fine indeed s... forme afsd ... was had to ... to the use of the afsd James Ryther & William Plumton & their heirs by virtue of which the same James Ryther & Wm Plumton entered into the same other moietie of the afsd manor ... The same William Plumpton aftwds released to the said James Ryther all the state, right, title & interest of the same the same William .... by virtue of which the same James Ryther was sole seized ... Afterwards, 30 Sep Eliz 38 (1596) the same James Ryther dyed soe seized after whose death the fsd manor descend to one Robert Ryther as son & heir of the said James. Who sold the property to Thomas Wentworth in 1601. ... Without this that the said John Ryther cofferer in the time wherein he was debtor to the said late King Edward 6 became or whither ever afterwards was seized in his demeanes
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Children of James Ryther and Elizabeth Atherton