William John Mackglew

(before 5 July 1807 - 1867)
     William John Mackglew was born before 5 July 1807 in Greenwich, Kent. He was christened on 5 July 1807 in St Saviour, Southwark, Surrey. He was the son of Daniel Mackglew and Martha Smith.
William John Mackglew married Eliza Whitbread on 30 September 1827 in St James, Clerkenwell, London.
     William John Mackglew and Eliza Whitbread were recorded on the 1841 census in 7 Queens Head Walk, Shoreditch, London. William Mackglew, 34, painter, not born in the county; Eliza, 34, Sarah 12, not born in the county; Elizabeth 10, Frederick 8, Louisa 6, Alfred 3 & Josiah 1, all born in the county.
     William John Mackglew and Eliza Whitbread were recorded on the 1851 census in 41 Ely Place, St Leonard Shoreditch, Tower Hamlets, Middlesex. William Jno McGlew, head 46, painter, born Greenwich, Kent, Eliza his wife aged 44, born Essex, Chelsmford, Frederick son 17, Louisa daughter 15, Alfred son, 13 , Josiah son 11, Martha 9, Eliza 6, all born at Shoreditch.
     William John Mackglew and Eliza Whitbread were recorded on the 1861 census in Shoreditch, Middlesex. William McGlew, head 54, painter & paper hanger, born Kent, Rd, Eliza his wife aged 54, born Ramsden Heath, Essex, Eliza daughter 16, born Shoreditch.
     William died in 1867 in West London RD.

Children of William John Mackglew and Eliza Whitbread

William Richard Mackglew

(26 June 1830 - )
     William Richard Mackglew was born on 26 June 1830 in London. He was the son of William John Mackglew and Eliza Whitbread. William Richard Mackglew was christened on 25 July 1830 in St Giles Without Cripplegate.

James Leslie MacKindley

( - 1969)
     James Leslie MacKindley was also known as MacKindlay in records. He was commonly known as Les.
James Leslie MacKindley married Vair Linton, daughter of John James Linton and Jessie Bates Dunbar, in 1939 in Victoria.
     James died in 1969 in Dromana, Victoria.

Agnes Violet Mackinnon

(30 July 1897 - September 1970)
     Agnes Violet Mackinnon was born on 30 July 1897 in Half Way Tree, St Andrew parish, Jamaica, West Indies. She was the daughter of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch. Louis, Ronald, Lionel and Agnes were listed as Louis Fullarton Mackinnon's children in the 1911 census in 46 Croxted Road, West Dulwich, Camberwell, Surrey.
     Agnes's death was registered in the quarter ending in September 1970 in Westminster RD, Middlesex, England.

Alan Fullarton Mackinnon

(10 August 1891 - 27 December 1895)
     Alan Fullarton Mackinnon was born on 10 August 1891 in Half Way Tree, St Andrew parish, Jamaica, West Indies. He was the son of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch.
     Alan died on 27 December 1895 in St Andrew parish, Jamaica, West Indies, aged 4.

Beryl Rose M Mackinnon

(1876 - )
     Beryl Rose M Mackinnon was born in 1876 in Lima, Peru. She was the daughter of Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes. Louis, Beryl, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1881 census in 10? Norfolk Rd, Littlehampton, Sussex.

Campbell Mackinnon

(22 November 1842 - 1 February 1918)
     Campbell Mackinnon was also known as Thomas Campbell in records. He was born on 22 November 1842 in Halse Hall, Clarendon, Middllesex, Jamaica, West Indies. He was the son of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Sarah Ashby. Campbell Mackinnon was christened on 21 December 1842 in Clarendon, Middllesex, Jamaica.
     Campbell matriculated at Oxford University between 1862 and 1866 and was awarded Bachelor of Arts in 1866. He matriculated in 23 Oct 1862, aged 19, eldest son of Lewis Fullerton, of Clarendon, Isle of Jamaica, gent.
In 1872 Rev C Mackinnon, BA was taking services in the Cathedral at Spanish Town, Jamaica.
Campbell Mackinnon married Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes before 1874. Carleton J. H. MacKinnon b. 1878
Carmen Mary MacKinnon b. 1881. Campbell Mackinnon was mentioned in a letter from Louis Fullarton Mackinnon dated 6 January 1878. The Whim, Old Harbour, Jamaica, January 6th 1878
     My dearly beloved cousin
     My very best wishes attend you on your natal day. I am writing at night but all our circle? visited? today at dinner in wishing you health and prosperity, and all sent you their love , i.e. my spouse, Mary and my two girls. In general Jane? & Willie come to us to spend Saturday and Sunday but they were not able to do so this week.
     I have been not a little disappointed at not hearing from you and dear Margaret during the past year, and I should have been in great anxiety but that the post mistress? of our village was found guilty of stealing three hundred letters for which wickedness she is now in prison. There was no letter of yours found amongst the lot discovered, but it is supposed that she must have destroyed some although she was so "left to herself" as the Scotch say, as to keep enough to prove her guilty. I hope that a letter of yours or Margaret's was amongst them else what has caused your silence. I was delighted at receiving a long and most interesting letter from dear Margaret in the middle of 1876. I replied to it on her birthday the 14th Sept 76. I then wrote to you on the 6th Jan 77 just a year ago, but I have not had the happiness of a line from any of you. If any evil had befallen you I think one of your daughters or good sons in law would have written to tell me. I am full of fear that dear Margaret has been ill again I hope not. I can only pray for you and yours and that I do daily and each milestone as I reach it reminds me how soon the time is approaching when we shall meet again to part no more. Thanks be unto God for his revealed? word and promises therein to all who .. looking to Christ for salvation. Last year I was much afflicted by the long illness of my dear girl Isabella but she has been quite well again since last August. She was ill a year and two months, a time of great anxiety and trouble to me.
Most providentially a girl came out from England for a change of climate who had had exactly the same illness hysteria and she gave me the address of the medical man who had cured and who is famous for curing that most tormenting disorder. By Miss R's account she had been worse than

2. Isabel and she was perfectly cured. The prescription he sent (Jos ........ to consult him) was a course of ... and it was magical in its effects. She only took it eight months having been ill six months before we got his advice. I ... you this because medical men tell me that it is an illness which was unknown in their younger days - or very rare - and it is now a ... ... as well ... disease. I hope none your dear ones may ever be so tried. All the ... of my ... are flourishing I am thankful to say. Campbell and his family are still in Lima, and Ella had a third child, a fine boy on the 17th Nov. Mackinnon's birthday. The congregation at Lima have
b. Campbell to stay two weeks longer and promised him £50 a year more. I love children dearly and it is now small disappointment that they are so far beyond my read.
The passage from here to the colonies is only three days and the railway across Panama only four hours, from Panama a splendid steamer takes one to Callas in nine days and the railway from Callas to Lima is only 8 miles. This seems ... very difficult to get over to exchange visits and the expenses as Lima are beyond every thing I ever heard of . This little place of .... is quite full and the number of communicants doubled since he went there but as it is a .... bigoted Roman Catholic county the number of Protestants is very small.
We have a new Governor arrived but I have not yet been able to call on Lady Musgrave. I was not very well, and Mackinnon has had a rheumatic knee for some little time and it is not pleasant to go to strangers, as invalids. We sent Louis and Ellen with our cards and hope to go soon ourselves.
This last year was remarkable for a number of deaths from Yellow fever amongst families who reside in the highest mountains. The
I suppose you remember Mr John Ly... His brother 'Frank' is just dead leaving a widow and family very badly off. It grieves me to think of all the troubles you have had through your ... life but your dear bright grandchildren I can well imagine are a great joy and comfort to you. I hope dear Margaret ... not a ... to ... remember for a long time and that she is strong and well. A very large family must be a constant source of anxiety and great trial of strength to a mother who .... them all. My dear Spouse is well thanks be to God. He is ... me to have my photo taken and if it is done I will send you one. I feel and look old but I have yet lost a tooth I rejoice to say. Mary had a little of the fever prevalent but is on the whole well. I am very sure she would send you and yours her best love if she was with me. She often talks of her meeting with your young folks in England. How strange it is that people who love each other dearly are destined to pass the best part of their life in opposite parts of the world. Now when Campbell goes to Lima I shall feel as if he were in Australia, somehow England feels much nearer. We know it is the best place in the world in every sense. Parting with any one to go there seems quite a different think.

Colonial Secretary, Mr Rushworth, with whom we were intimate was one of the victims. His step son, who had come out from England on a few months visit was the first. He had three days illness only - then Mr R....th's daughter and lastly himself. It threw such gloom over society for a long time. Ellen & Willie bec... a very gay garden party at their house about a fortnight before the youth's death and Ellen said it was difficult to think of it as so soon t... into such a sense of woe.
A few weeks ago I met our old friends Mr Mortlock. I should not have known him again although Ellen had told me of the great change in his appearance. When she met him some time before I did... asking that if that was one of the beaux the other time they must have been a sorry set? Although

3. he married a very young girl who had money three or four years ago, he has a most dilapidated look. He reminded me of one of the pictures in the Old Curiosity Shop. He married a Miss Williams, a grand- daughter of Col. Willock. You doubtless remember him, and his son Frank and the girls. I heard last week that Ann Fray that was - Mrs Patterson has removed to Kingston, her daughter having married a merchant there. She was enquiring after us, but we have not met. Mrs Dewar sends her pretty daughter to visit friends in Kingston but we have not met.
I do not remember any one else that it would interest you to hear of. Mrs Land's eldest daughter waited until 38 and then married a rich well looking agreeable man - a Dr Hamilton. I ought to have said Mrs Stewart for Mrs Land married a second time and was most unhappy in her second marriage. She told me once when staying with us at Hal... Hall that unhappiness in married life was always the wife's fault. When I heard of the wretched life she led I often thought of her opinion on this point. Her first marriage was indeed a happy one poor thing...
One of her daughters married Lt Kitchener, but he has left the Army and gone to New Zealand to manage his uncle's property there.
Agnes resides in Kingston again, this place did not agree with her. She is still very delicate in health I am sorry to say. Her good unselfish daughter Janie? is a real treasure to her. I hope your good Anne is alive and well. Remember me to her if she is within your reach. We do hope to go to Milk River Bath next week for the benefit of my dear Spouse's lame knee. It is the place where we met first and we like to revisit it sometimes for the sake of Auld Lang Syne, but we have not been there since 1871. Now that Mackinnon in Manager of the Railway as well as attorney for it, which he only was for some years, we go into Kingston every week and stay some days at the Railway House. Louis resides there which makes it pleasant for us. Mary sends her best love to you and the girls. She often talks of meeting in London with you and your young people. I do so long to hear of you all again. In my heart I revile the post mistress at times, and at other moments I fear that Margaret is ill or George. Why I do not fancy you or Mala ill I cannot think but so it is. I hope that the Church which good Mr D. is ... had such a share in building is flourishing.

3. he married a very young girl she had money three or four years ago, he has amuch delapiidated look. - reminded me of one of the icu

Poor Jamaica was the last place in Christendom to have the church disestablished. The people are so bitterly indifferent to religion that I verily believe a great many would not be sorry to see the Churches shut up and the Dissenters would of course rejoice, not that their places of worship are a little fuller that they used to be. They will have a great deal to answer for I think in having succeeded in getting the church here disestablished. ... of numbers of clergymen have left because they & their families cannot live on the small sum given to them and of which little as it is they cannot be sure for more than a year at once.
I hope you will write me soon my dearest cousin. I pray daily that we may meet in heaven when our sojourn on earth is over. Mackinnon has just come in and he desires me to send to you and yours his love and best wishes. Isabell often talks of her little cousins whom she would like so much to see. The boy and Ellen unite in best love and ever believe me my dearest friend and cousin
Yours most affectionately
L Mackinnon


[Written across page 1]
What joy it must be to you that your son-in-law takes so deep an interest in such matters. - Lewis - Mackinnon and the girls join Mary and myself in best love and very best wishes to you and all your dear ones and I am ever my dearest coz your very affectionately attached friend and cousin,
L Mackinnon
.
He became a Catholic. Listed in "Converts to Rome: a list of about four thousand Protestants who have recently become Roman Catholics, compiled by W Gordon Gorman, 1885; available on line via Archive.org. His entry reads:
Rev. Campbell Mackinnon, B.A., till lately Incumbent of Port Royal, Jamaica, and formerly Chaplain to the British Residency in Lima, Peru. (1879), followed by: wife of the Rev. Campbell Mackinnon, B.A., Oxon ; and family. (1878). Campbell was the incumbent clergyman. In 2002 Andrew Atherstone wrote on the Genealogy.com genforum: In search of information on Campbell Mackinnon, who studied at Queen's College Oxford in the 1860s. He was an Anglican clergyman - consular chaplain at Lima Peru & then incumbent of Port Royal, Jamaica. He and his family became Roman Catholics c.1878. I contacted him but he couldn't help further at Port Royal, Kingston, Jamaica. As of between 1881 and 1891, Campbell Mackinnon was also known as Thomas C Mackinnon in records. He and his family were listed on the 1881 & 1891 census at Littlehampton, Sussex & Hammersmith, Mdx. He had a son Louis Arth Rankin(g) baptised 9 Feb 1874 in Jamaica.
He and his family were listed on the 1881 census at Littlehampton, Sussex. He was late clerk in Holy Orders. He had a son Louis Arthur Rankin(g) baptised 9 Feb 1874 in Jamaica who was a merchant's clerk in 1891.
     Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes were recorded on the 1881 census in 10? Norfolk Rd, Littlehampton, Sussex. Thomas C. Mackinnon 38, clergyman of Ch of Eng, born Jamaica; his wife Henrietta Ella Mackinnon 29, born Jamaica; children Louis Arthur R Mackinnon 7, born Jamaica; Beryl Rose M. Mackinnon 5, born Lima, Peru, British Subject; Carleton J H Mackinnon 3, ditto, Carmen Mary Mackinnon, 5 months, born Littlehampton, Adelaide Rose G. Forbes 22 , sister in law, unmarried, born Jamaica; Matilda M. Payne 17, Charlotte Emily Boswell 14, servants.
     Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes were recorded on the 1891 census in 16 Ravenscourt Gardens, Hammersmith, London. Thomas C Mackinnon 48, late clerk in Holy Orders, political lecturer... born Jamaica; his wife Henrietta E L Mackinnon 39, born Jamaica; children Louis A R Mackinnon 17, merchant's clerk, born Jamaica; Joseph C H Mackinnon 13, born Lima, Peru, British subject; Carmen M Mackinnon 10, John B A Mackinnon 8, both born at Littlehampton, Ssx, and servant Emma Cator 21.
     Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes were recorded on the 1901 census in 1 Fairlawn Ave?, Acton, London. Thos Campbell Mackinnon 58, retired clergyman (ch of Eng), born Jamaica; Henrietta Ella Louisa Mackinnon 49, born Jamaica, daughter Carmen Mary Mackinnon 20, teacher of music, born Littlehampton, Ssx, Antonie Brunow 19, boarder, clerk, born France with servant Caroline Hales 20.
     Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes were recorded on the 1911 census in 18 Powis Square, Bayswater West, London, England. Campbell McKinnon aged 68, married, boarder, private means, born Clarendon, Jamaica, with his wife Mrs McKinnon, aged 57, born St Elizabeth, Jamaica.
     Campbell died on 1 February 1918 aged 75.
     His will was proved on 1 March 1918 in London. Thomas Campbell MacKinnon, of 47 North Side, Clapham, Surrey, deid 13 Feb 1918/ Probate granted to Henrietta Ellen Mackinnon, widow. Effects £162 0s 6d..

Children of Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes

Campbell Mackinnon

(27 September 1806 - before 1 April 1871)
     Campbell Mackinnon was born on 27 September 1806 in Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland. Son of Dr John McKinnon, of Park House & Isabella Fullarton. He was the son of John Mackinnon DD and Isabella Fullarton. Campbell Mackinnon was christened on 27 January 1807 in Ayr.
He worked as a doctor in the Indian Medical Service in Bengal from 1830 to his retirement in 1862. A journal of a voyage on the "Frances Anne" from Liverpool to Calcutta, 42 pages was kept - probably to be sent to his mother as the last page closes with greetings to her.
     Campbell Mackinnon and Isabella Fullarton were recorded on the 1861 census in 7 Barns Terrace, Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland. Isabella Mackinnon, aged 76, born Arran, clergyman's widow, with son Campbell 54, born Arran, Inspector General of Hospitals, Bengal Service; daughter Charlotte Mackinnon, 53, with two servants.
Campbell Mackinnon married Mary Stewart McKenzie Beatson on 31 July 1861. She was the youngest daughter of of the late Mr H O Beatson of Campbelton, Argylshire. They had a son aged four and a half at his father's death. Campbell was doctor (MD, CB) and ended his career as Inspector General of Hospitals in Bengal, Irivng states: Campbell, Inspector General of Hospitals, who took a conspicuous part at the siege of Delhi, for which he received the decoration of the Bath, married Miss Beatson, Campbelltown, and by her left an only son..
     Campbell died before 1 April 1871.

Child of Campbell Mackinnon and Mary Stewart McKenzie Beatson

Carleton Joseph H Mackinnon

(1878 - December 1938)
     Carleton Joseph H Mackinnon was commonly known as Joseph. He was born in 1878 in Lima, Peru. He was the son of Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes. Louis, Beryl, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1881 census in 10? Norfolk Rd, Littlehampton, Sussex. Louis, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1891 census in 16 Ravenscourt Gardens, Hammersmith, London.
     Carleton's death was registered in the quarter ending in December 1938 in Chechester RD, Sussex.

Carmen Mary Mackinnon

(December 1881 - June 1956)
     Louis, Beryl, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1881 census in 10? Norfolk Rd, Littlehampton, Sussex. Carmen Mary Mackinnon's birth was registered in the quarter ending in December 1881 in Littlehampton, East Preston RD, Sussex. She was the daughter of Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes. Louis, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1891 census in 16 Ravenscourt Gardens, Hammersmith, London. Carmen Mary Mackinnon was listed as Campbell Mackinnon's daughter in the 1901 census in 1 Fairlawn Ave?, Acton, London.
     Carmen's death was registered in the quarter ending in June 1956 in Westminster RD, Middlesex.

Charlotte Campbell Mackinnon

(29 April 1808 - )
     Charlotte Campbell Mackinnon was born on 17 March 1808 in Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland. She was christened on 29 April 1808 in Ayr. She was the daughter of John Mackinnon DD and Isabella Fullarton. Charlotte was listed as the daughter of Isabella Fullarton in the 1861 census in 7 Barns Terrace, Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland. Isabella Mackinnon, aged 76, born Arran, clergyman's widow, with son Campbell 54, born Arran, Inspector General of Hospitals, Bengal Service; daughter Charlotte Mackinnon, 53, with two servants.

Dr David John MacKinnon

(1958 - )
     Dr David John MacKinnon was born in 1958 in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

Duncan Mackinnon

Child of Duncan Mackinnon

Edward Kenneth Mackinnon

(31 January 1893 - 6 November 1893)
     Edward Kenneth Mackinnon was born on 31 January 1893 in 'Methven Lodge', Half Way Tree, St Andrew parish, Jamaica, West Indies. She was the daughter of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch.
     Edward died on 6 November 1893 in St Andrew parish, Jamaica, West Indies.

Elizabeth Gunn Mackinnon

(10 May 1805 - )
     Elizabeth Gunn Mackinnon was born on 10 May 1805 in Kilbride, Isle of Arran, Bute, Scotland. Irene Fullarton states born at Campbeltown, Argyll. She was the daughter of John Mackinnon DD and Isabella Fullarton. Elizabeth Gunn Mackinnon was christened on 2 July 1805 in Kilbride, Isle of Arran Bute.

Ellen Mary Mackinnon

(13 August 1851 - )
     Ellen Mary Mackinnon was also known as Ella in records. She was born on 13 August 1851 in Jamaica, West Indies. She was the daughter of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Sarah Ashby. Ellen Mary Mackinnon was christened on 9 February 1852 in Jamaica. Ellen Mary, born 18 August 1851, daughter of Lewis Fullarton MacKinnon of Halse Hall, and Sarah his wife, by the Rev Nathan Ashby.
She married Charles Frederick Douet on 17 Jan 1882 at Kingston.
.
Ellen Mary Mackinnon married Charles Frederick Douet on 17 January 1882 in Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies.

Isabella Mackinnon

(circa 1847 - 28 July 1895)
     Isabella Mackinnon was also known as Ella in records. She was born circa 1847. She was the daughter of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Sarah Ashby.
     Isabella died on 28 July 1895 in Old Harbour, St Catherine parish, Jamaica, West Indies. She was buried at St Dorothy's Anglican church, Church Pen with her father as: ISABELLA FULLARTON MACKINNON, HIS ELDEST DAUGHTER,
WHO DIED ON THE 28TH JULY 1895, AGED 48..

John Mackinnon

(8 March 1813 - 2 March 1871)
     John Mackinnon was born on 8 March 1813. He was the son of John Mackinnon DD and Isabella Fullarton.
     John died on 2 March 1871 aged 57. He was Inspector General of the HEICS.

John Campbell Mackinnon

(27 August 1866 - )
     John Campbell Mackinnon was born on 27 August 1866. He was the son of Campbell Mackinnon and Mary Stewart McKenzie Beatson.

John Mackinnon DD

(circa 1770 - 21 March 1816)
     John Mackinnon DD was born circa 1770 in Isle of Arran, Bute, Scotland. He was the eldest on of Duncan M'Kinnon, farmer; educated at University of Glasgow; after licence he became tutor to the family of the Duke of Argyll; took orders in the Church of England and was appointed Chaplain to 3rd Foot. DD (Edinburgh) 24 June 1794); presented by George William, Duke of Argyll, Sep 1814; ordained 27 April 1815. Being in feeble health he left the island without leave being given by the Presbytery, and went to reside at Ayr. On the 6 June 1815 he was ordered back to his parish.... He was the son of Duncan Mackinnon.
John Mackinnon DD married Isabella Fullarton, daughter of Lewis Fullarton (A mess to be sorted - 2 generations) and Susanna Stuart, on 28 November 1802 in Kilmichael House, Kilbride, Isle of Arran, Bute, Scotland. At Kilmichaei House, 1sle of Arran, the Rev. Dr M'Kiunon, to Miss Isabella Fullarton, daughter of the late Lewis Fullarton, Esq. of Kilmichael. John JOHN M KINNON, born Island of Arran, about 1745, eldest son of Duncan M., farmer; educated at Univ. of Glasgow ; after licence he became tutor to the family of the Duke of Argyll ; took orders in Church of England and was app. Chaplain to 3rd Foot; D.D. (Edinburgh, 24th June 1794) ; pres. .by George William, Duke of Argyll, Sept. 1814 ; ord. 27th April 1815. Being in feeble health he left the island without leave being given by the Presb., and went to reside at Ayr. On 6th June 1815 he was ordered back to his parish. A letter from him, dated 11th July, explained that the state of his health forbade such a step, and that under the circumstances the patron had
appointed an assistant and successor. On 7th Nov. he was again enjoined to return, but again declined, stating, however, that he had arranged for the pastoral duties to be carried on until his successor was admitted. On revising the proceedings of the Presb., the Synod, on 7th Aug. 1816, recorded their high disapprobation of the
conduct of the Presb., particularly for proceeding in such ordination and admission without requiring a certificate from the Presb. in whose bounds M. had resided, which was the more necessary in his case as it was publicly reported and generally believed that he had for many years before been in orders of the Church of England. The Presb. was rebuked. M. had never been present as a member of the Court. He died at Ayr 21st March 1816, four months before the meeting of Synod. [See Hew Scott, vol. iii., 90, for a copy of M. s letter to the Presb.] He marr. in 1802 Isabella
(died 21st Jan. 1864), daugh. of Lewis Fullarton of Kilmichael, Arran, and had issueElizabeth, born 10th May 1805 ; Campbell, born 27th Sept. 1807 ; Charlotte, born 17th March 1809; Lewis, born 10th Nov. 1811; John, C.B., M.D., Inspector-General, H.E.I.C.S., born 8th March 1813, died 2nd March 1871.
at Kirkapol, Tyree, Argyll & Bute, in 1815.
     John died on 21 March 1816 in Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland.

Children of John Mackinnon DD and Isabella Fullarton

Lionel Norman Mackinnon

(11 November 1894 - 20 April 1926)
     Lionel Norman Mackinnon was also known as Fullerton Mackinnon in records. He was born on 11 November 1894 in Half Way Tree, St Andrew parish, Jamaica, West Indies. He was the son of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch. Louis, Ronald, Lionel and Agnes were listed as Louis Fullarton Mackinnon's children in the 1911 census in 46 Croxted Road, West Dulwich, Camberwell, Surrey.
     Lionel was educated at Dulwich College, Surrey.
The London gazette announced on 19 March 1915: the undermentioned cadets and ex-cadets of the Officer Traning Corps to be temporary Secon Lieutanants. Dated 17 March: Lionel Norman Fullerton-Mackinnon, Ashby Arthr William Hooper.
Lionel Norman Mackinnon served in the military He was a Captain in the Royal Field Artillery. He was married. between 1915 and 1920.
In 1919 as a 25 year old he travelled to New York on the Baltic..
     Lionel died on 20 April 1926 aged 31.

Louis Arthur Mackinnon

(1874 - )
     Louis Arthur Mackinnon was born in 1874 in Jamaica. He was the son of Campbell Mackinnon and Henrietta Ella Louisa Forbes. Louis Arthur Mackinnon was christened on 9 February 1874. Louis Arthur Ranking Mackinnon, son of Campbell and Elle Hernietta Forbes.. Louis, Beryl, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1881 census in 10? Norfolk Rd, Littlehampton, Sussex. Louis, Carleton and Carmen were listed as the children of Campbell Mackinnon in the 1891 census in 16 Ravenscourt Gardens, Hammersmith, London.

Louis Charles Bowden Fullerton Mackinnon

(circa 1888 - 21 March 1918)
     Louis Charles Bowden Fullerton Mackinnon was born circa 1888 in Jamaica, West Indies. He was educated at Dulwich College.. He was the son of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch. Louis, Ronald, Lionel and Agnes were listed as Louis Fullarton Mackinnon's children in the 1911 census in 46 Croxted Road, West Dulwich, Camberwell, Surrey.
The website: Jamaica's part in the Great War states: ITAL LOUIS CHARLES BOWDEN FULLARTON MAcKINNON, Lieutenant, R.E., son of the late Louis F. MacKinnon, went to England when his father retired from the Jamaica Railway,and was educated at Dulwich College. He entered the London Scottish as a private, March 1916; went out to France September 1916; served through the Somme battles, and received a commission in the R.E in November 1916. He returned home to be trained, and went out to France again inthe autumn of 1917; was reported missing March 21, 1918..
     Louis died on 21 March 1918 in Arras, Calais, France. He was serving in the Royal Engineers. He may have been the Louis C B F Mackinnon who married Dorothy Girvan in the Sep qtr of 1917 in Lambeth.
     The administration of his estate was granted on 28 August 1918 Louis Charles Bowden Fullarton of 22 Dalmore-road, Dulwich, Surey, second-lieutenant R. E. died on or since 21 March 1918 in France. Admon to Agnes Louise Ann Mackinnon widow [his mother?]. Efects £205 13s 7d.

Louis Fullarton Mackinnon

(17 November 1809 - 19 May 1878)
     Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was also known as Lewis in records. He was born on 17 November 1809 in Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland. He was the son of John Mackinnon DD and Isabella Fullarton. Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was christened on 8 January 1810 in Ayr.
Letter from Louis Mackinnon offering his services as attorney for Amity Hall estate 15 Dec 1839 ... copy of power of attorney to MacKinnon 29 Jan 1841.
Louis Fullarton Mackinnon married Sarah Ashby, daughter of Nathan Ashby and Sarah Harbourn Nowell, on 2 November 1839? In Montego Bay, Jamaica. Antigua weekly reporter: Nov 19 1839?: At Montego Bay, Jamaica, on 2 Nov by Rev William N Ashby of Church Missionary Society, L F M'Kinnon, Esq of Vere to Sarah, eldest daughter of Nathan Ashby esq. acting collector of Customs, Montego Bay. Extracts from The Barbadian XVII 1839 BNHS v. 8 p. 173.
In 1844 he replaced F W Watson in the management of the Vere estate of Henry Goulburn.
     Louis resided at 'Halse Hall', Clarendon, Middlesex, Jamaica, July 1861.
Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was listed in a directory dated 1865 as The 1865 Jamaica Almanac, listed the H M Privy Council:... Hon. Lewis Fullarton McKinnon,he was also listed in the Legislative Council at Jamaica.
In November 1866 he was appointed a non-official member of the Legislative Council of Jamaica. He was described as a planter and custos of the parish of Vere and a gentleman of standing in the community.
     Louis resided at Whim/Old Harbour, St Catherine parish, Jamaica, 1878.
     Louis Fullarton Mackinnon sent a letter dated 6 January 1878 to Mary Reddish. The Whim, Old Harbour, Jamaica, January 6th 1878
     My dearly beloved cousin
     My very best wishes attend you on your natal day. I am writing at night but all our circle? visited? today at dinner in wishing you health and prosperity, and all sent you their love , i.e. my spouse, Mary and my two girls. In general Jane? & Willie come to us to spend Saturday and Sunday but they were not able to do so this week.
     I have been not a little disappointed at not hearing from you and dear Margaret during the past year, and I should have been in great anxiety but that the post mistress? of our village was found guilty of stealing three hundred letters for which wickedness she is now in prison. There was no letter of yours found amongst the lot discovered, but it is supposed that she must have destroyed some although she was so "left to herself" as the Scotch say, as to keep enough to prove her guilty. I hope that a letter of yours or Margaret's was amongst them else what has caused your silence. I was delighted at receiving a long and most interesting letter from dear Margaret in the middle of 1876. I replied to it on her birthday the 14th Sept 76. I then wrote to you on the 6th Jan 77 just a year ago, but I have not had the happiness of a line from any of you. If any evil had befallen you I think one of your daughters or good sons in law would have written to tell me. I am full of fear that dear Margaret has been ill again I hope not. I can only pray for you and yours and that I do daily and each milestone as I reach it reminds me how soon the time is approaching when we shall meet again to part no more. Thanks be unto God for his revealed? word and promises therein to all who .. looking to Christ for salvation. Last year I was much afflicted by the long illness of my dear girl Isabella but she has been quite well again since last August. She was ill a year and two months, a time of great anxiety and trouble to me.
Most providentially a girl came out from England for a change of climate who had had exactly the same illness hysteria and she gave me the address of the medical man who had cured and who is famous for curing that most tormenting disorder. By Miss R's account she had been worse than

2. Isabel and she was perfectly cured. The prescription he sent (Jos ........ to consult him) was a course of ... and it was magical in its effects. She only took it eight months having been ill six months before we got his advice. I ... you this because medical men tell me that it is an illness which was unknown in their younger days - or very rare - and it is now a ... ... as well ... disease. I hope none your dear ones may ever be so tried. All the ... of my ... are flourishing I am thankful to say. Campbell and his family are still in Lima, and Ella had a third child, a fine boy on the 17th Nov. Mackinnon's birthday. The congregation at Lima have
b. Campbell to stay two weeks longer and promised him £50 a year more. I love children dearly and it is now small disappointment that they are so far beyond my read.
The passage from here to the colonies is only three days and the railway across Panama only four hours, from Panama a splendid steamer takes one to Callas in nine days and the railway from Callas to Lima is only 8 miles. This seems ... very difficult to get over to exchange visits and the expenses as Lima are beyond every thing I ever heard of . This little place of .... is quite full and the number of communicants doubled since he went there but as it is a .... bigoted Roman Catholic county the number of Protestants is very small.
We have a new Governor arrived but I have not yet been able to call on Lady Musgrave. I was not very well, and Mackinnon has had a rheumatic knee for some little time and it is not pleasant to go to strangers, as invalids. We sent Louis and Ellen with our cards and hope to go soon ourselves.
This last year was remarkable for a number of deaths from Yellow fever amongst families who reside in the highest mountains. The
I suppose you remember Mr John Ly... His brother 'Frank' is just dead leaving a widow and family very badly off. It grieves me to think of all the troubles you have had through your ... life but your dear bright grandchildren I can well imagine are a great joy and comfort to you. I hope dear Margaret ... not a ... to ... remember for a long time and that she is strong and well. A very large family must be a constant source of anxiety and great trial of strength to a mother who .... them all. My dear Spouse is well thanks be to God. He is ... me to have my photo taken and if it is done I will send you one. I feel and look old but I have yet lost a tooth I rejoice to say. Mary had a little of the fever prevalent but is on the whole well. I am very sure she would send you and yours her best love if she was with me. She often talks of her meeting with your young folks in England. How strange it is that people who love each other dearly are destined to pass the best part of their life in opposite parts of the world. Now when Campbell goes to Lima I shall feel as if he were in Australia, somehow England feels much nearer. We know it is the best place in the world in every sense. Parting with any one to go there seems quite a different think.

Colonial Secretary, Mr Rushworth, with whom we were intimate was one of the victims. His step son, who had come out from England on a few months visit was the first. He had three days illness only - then Mr R....th's daughter and lastly himself. It threw such gloom over society for a long time. Ellen & Willie bec... a very gay garden party at their house about a fortnight before the youth's death and Ellen said it was difficult to think of it as so soon t... into such a sense of woe.
A few weeks ago I met our old friends Mr Mortlock. I should not have known him again although Ellen had told me of the great change in his appearance. When she met him some time before I did... asking that if that was one of the beaux the other time they must have been a sorry set? Although

3. he married a very young girl who had money three or four years ago, he has a most dilapidated look. He reminded me of one of the pictures in the Old Curiosity Shop. He married a Miss Williams, a grand- daughter of Col. Willock. You doubtless remember him, and his son Frank and the girls. I heard last week that Ann Fray that was - Mrs Patterson has removed to Kingston, her daughter having married a merchant there. She was enquiring after us, but we have not met. Mrs Dewar sends her pretty daughter to visit friends in Kingston but we have not met.
I do not remember any one else that it would interest you to hear of. Mrs Land's eldest daughter waited until 38 and then married a rich well looking agreeable man - a Dr Hamilton. I ought to have said Mrs Stewart for Mrs Land married a second time and was most unhappy in her second marriage. She told me once when staying with us at Hal... Hall that unhappiness in married life was always the wife's fault. When I heard of the wretched life she led I often thought of her opinion on this point. Her first marriage was indeed a happy one poor thing...
One of her daughters married Lt Kitchener, but he has left the Army and gone to New Zealand to manage his uncle's property there.
Agnes resides in Kingston again, this place did not agree with her. She is still very delicate in health I am sorry to say. Her good unselfish daughter Janie? is a real treasure to her. I hope your good Anne is alive and well. Remember me to her if she is within your reach. We do hope to go to Milk River Bath next week for the benefit of my dear Spouse's lame knee. It is the place where we met first and we like to revisit it sometimes for the sake of Auld Lang Syne, but we have not been there since 1871. Now that Mackinnon in Manager of the Railway as well as attorney for it, which he only was for some years, we go into Kingston every week and stay some days at the Railway House. Louis resides there which makes it pleasant for us. Mary sends her best love to you and the girls. She often talks of meeting in London with you and your young people. I do so long to hear of you all again. In my heart I revile the post mistress at times, and at other moments I fear that Margaret is ill or George. Why I do not fancy you or Mala ill I cannot think but so it is. I hope that the Church which good Mr D. is ... had such a share in building is flourishing.

3. he married a very young girl she had money three or four years ago, he has amuch delapiidated look. - reminded me of one of the icu

Poor Jamaica was the last place in Christendom to have the church disestablished. The people are so bitterly indifferent to religion that I verily believe a great many would not be sorry to see the Churches shut up and the Dissenters would of course rejoice, not that their places of worship are a little fuller that they used to be. They will have a great deal to answer for I think in having succeeded in getting the church here disestablished. ... of numbers of clergymen have left because they & their families cannot live on the small sum given to them and of which little as it is they cannot be sure for more than a year at once.
I hope you will write me soon my dearest cousin. I pray daily that we may meet in heaven when our sojourn on earth is over. Mackinnon has just come in and he desires me to send to you and yours his love and best wishes. Isabell often talks of her little cousins whom she would like so much to see. The boy and Ellen unite in best love and ever believe me my dearest friend and cousin
Yours most affectionately
L Mackinnon


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What joy it must be to you that your son-in-law takes so deep an interest in such matters. - Lewis - Mackinnon and the girls join Mary and myself in best love and very best wishes to you and all your dear ones and I am ever my dearest coz your very affectionately attached friend and cousin,
L Mackinnon
.
     Louis died on 19 May 1878 in Whim Pen, Whim, St Catherine parish, Jamaica, West Indies, aged 68. Thursday, May 23, 1878 Our Kingston contemporaries announce the death of the Honorable Louis Fullerton McKinnon, non-official member of the Legislative Council and sometimes Custos of St Catherine. He was also manager of the Jamaica Railway. He was 68.. He was buried on 20 May 1878 in St Dorothy's church, Church Pen, Old Harbour, St Catherine parish, Jamaica, West Indies. Inscription: IN LOVING MEMORY OF
THE HON. LOUIS FULLARTON MACKINNON, OF THE WHIM, OLD HARBOUR, WHO DIED ON THE 18TH MAY 1878, AGED 68.

     His will was proved on 22 November 1880 at the Principal Probate Registry, London. The will of the Honourable Louis Mackinnon otherwise Louis Fullarton Mackinnon, late of the parish of St Catherine, Jamaica, who died 20 May 1878 at the Whim Pen in the said parish, was proved at the Principal Registry by Louis Fullarton Mackinnon of the city and parish of Kingston in the said island, and William Mackinnon of Kingston, gentleman, the sons, two of the executors. Estate valued at under £300 in England.

Children of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Sarah Ashby

Louis Fullarton Mackinnon

(24 September 1848 - 17 August 1911)
     Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was also known as Lewis in records. He was born on 24 September 1848 in Clarendon, Jamaica, West Indies. He was the son of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Sarah Ashby. Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was christened on 3 November 1848 in Kingston, Surrey, Jamaica. He was baptised by Nathan Ashby.
In 1862 he was appointed a Privy Councillor of the Island of Jamaica.      
Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was appointed as a Member of the Legislative Council of the Island of Jamaica in 1867.
The Morning Post 26 Jan 1882 reported that the Royal Colonial Institure had elected as a Fellow Mr Louis Mackinnon, Jamaica.
Louis Fullarton Mackinnon married Agnes Louise Ann Lynch on 10 August 1887 in St Catherine parish, Jamaica, West Indies. He was the son of Louis Fullerton Mckinnon and she was the daughter of Edward Bancorft Lynch.
     Louis Fullarton Mackinnon was employed He was Manager of the Railways in 1894.
     Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch were recorded on the 1911 census in 46 Croxted Road, West Dulwich, Camberwell, Surrey. Lewis Fullarton Mackinnon 62, Retired Colonial Civil Service, his wife Agnes Louise Mackinnon 45, children Louis Charles Mackinnon 22, civil engineer, Ronald Fullerton Mackinnon 21, bank clerk, Bank of England, students Lionel Norman Mackinnon 16, Agnes Violet Mackinnon 13, nephew Maurice Gorden Lynch 11, all born in Jamaica.
     Louis died on 17 August 1911 in Camberwell RD, Surrey, England, aged 62.
     His will was proved on 16 September 1911 at London. Louis Fullarton Mackinnon of 46 Croxted Rd, West Dulwich, Surrey, died 17 August 1911. Probate granted to Agnes Luise Ann Mackinnon, widow. Effects £1812 9. 7d. Resworn £1001 1/7.

Children of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch

Mary Mackinnon

(30 December 1845 - )
     Mary Mackinnon was born on 29 October 1845 in Clarendon, Middlesex, Jamaica, West Indies. At Halse Hall, Clarendon, Jamaica, on the 29th Oct, the lady of Louis F Mackinnon, Esq., of a daughter. She was christened on 30 December 1845 in St Catherine parish, Jamaica, West Indies. She was the daughter of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Sarah Ashby.

Ronald Mackinnon

     Ronald Mackinnon married Lily Mary A Tapply LRAM (pianoforte), daughter of Rev Frederick Tapply and Ann Emily Pickmore Rumsey, in 1916.

Ronald Fullarton Mackinnon

(23 October 1889 - 21 October 1916)
     Ronald Fullarton Mackinnon was born on 23 October 1889 in Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. He was the son of Louis Fullarton Mackinnon and Agnes Louise Ann Lynch. Louis, Ronald, Lionel and Agnes were listed as Louis Fullarton Mackinnon's children in the 1911 census in 46 Croxted Road, West Dulwich, Camberwell, Surrey.
The website: Jamaica's part in the Great War states: RONALD FULLERTON MAcKINNON, M.C., Captain, son of the late Louis F. MacKinnon,Director of Jamaica Railway, was born in Kingston, Jamaica, but went to England on the retirementof his father. He was a Dulwich College boy: Captain of the Football team, chosen to play for AllEngland against South Africa, winner of the School Shield for swimming, and an all-round athlete.When the War broke out he was in Canada, and returning home obtained a commission as TemporaryLieutenant in the Hth Lancashire Fusiliers; was promoted Captain in 1916. He was awarded theMilitary Cross for conspicuous gallantry and ability north of the Warneton Railway on the night ofDecember 28-29, 1915, and was killed in action on October 2I,1916, whilst leading an R.E. wire–cutting party in the attack on Regina trench in the battle of the Somme.
     Ronald died on 21 October 1916 in France aged 26. He served with the 11th Lancashire Fusiliers. He was awarded the Military Cross in January 1916.
     The administration of his estate was granted on 2 March 1917 at London. Ronald Fullarton Mackinnon of 22 Dalmore Rd, Dulwich, Surrey, Captain in His Majesty's Army died 21 Oct 1916 in France on active service. Administration 2 March to Agnes Louise Ann MacKinnon, widow. Effects £136.

Angus Charles Mackintosh

(circa 1877 - )
     Angus Charles Mackintosh was born circa 1877 in London. He was the son of John McEwen Mackintosh and Sophy Mary Steer.