Dorothy Monk

(between 1564 and 1570 - 2 April 1654)
      See A Biographical Encyclopedia of Early Modern Englishwomen: Exemplary Lives ... edited by Carole Levin, Anna Riehl Bertolet, Jo Eldridge Carney for more on Dorothy. ...
In 1582, her mother in law Mary Wolverston, and 60 year grandmother in law Elizabeth Trewinnard were accused of attempting to sieze the ship Mari of San Sebastien and its cargo in Falmouth Harbur. The trio apparently planned to sell the vessel and its wares In Ireland... Only the intervention of her shuband's amily ... and by pardon of Eliz I, did dDorothy & her in laws escape riosn and perhaps death.. Dorothy Monk may have also been born. Dorothy, the daughter of John Howe & Elizabeth nee Pokeswell (whose father died in 1537), is described as the wife of John Killigrew in 'Stogursey: Manors', A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 6: Andersfield, Cannington, and North Petherton Hundreds (Bridgwater and neighbouring parishes) (1992), pp. 137-145. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=18607&strquery=dorothy killigrew* Date accessed: 12 March 2012. The text footnote cites: PRO/TNA CP 25(2)/206/32 Eliz. I East; Hutchins, Hist. Dors. i. 112. She was born between 1564 and 1570 in Potheridge, Merton, Devon. She was the daughter of Thomas Monk of Poderidge, Devon according to the memorial inscription erected by her son at Budock in 1617.
They came from North Devon, her tomb is at North Petherwin church, the home of her daughter's husband Yeo. [Joyce Hicks Oct 1991].
However she would seem to have been considerably older than her famous brothers, having a child born in 1600, even if the elder children in this family were not by her. She had at least 4 sisters & 6 brothers.
She is possibly the Mrs Dorothy Killigrew listed in Stithians 1660-64 hearth tax with 1 hearth "ex now Nich Polsew"?. She was the daughter of Sir Thomas Monk and Elizabeth Smith.
Dorothy Monk married John Killigrew, son of Sir John Killigrew and Mary Wolverston, in late 1578.
Petition to the lord Treasurer by Dorothy, wife of John Kylligrewe of Arwenneck, that her husband's lands, extended for a debt to the Queen, may be leased to Robert Balthroppe, chief surgeon to the Queen, to satisfy Kylligrewe's debt to him; 19 June 1590.
     Dorothy Monk and John Killigrew were mentioned in a deed dated 7 June 1596. 7 June 1596 Final Concord. Hugh Michell, querant, and Jn. Killigrew Esq., and w. Dorothy, deforciants.
In 1601 while her husband was in prison for debt, Dorothy Killigrew complained to the Privy Council that Sir Nicholas Parker, captain of Pendennis Castle, had cut down their woods.. Dorothy Monk and Odelia Killigrew were beneficiaries in Sir John Killigrew's will proved 29 May 1633 in Exeter, Devon.
     Dorothy was buried on 2 April 1654 in North Petherwin, Cornwall.

Children of Dorothy Monk and John Killigrew

Errol Larry Monk

Frances Monk

(24 May 1612 - )
     Frances Monk was christened on 24 May 1612 in Merton, Devon. She was the daughter of Sir Thomas Monk and Elizabeth Smith.

George Monk Duke of Albemarle

(8 December 1608 - 3 January 1669/70)
      George Monk, duke of Albemarle, a distinguished military commander, and the great promoter of the restoration of Charles II., was the son of Sir Thomas Monk, of Potheridge, near Torrington, in Devonshire, and was born in 1608. Being a younger son, he entered the army as a volunteer, served under his relation Sir Richard Grenville, in an expedition to Spain, and afterwards for some years in the Netherlands. On the breaking out of the war between Charles I and the Scots in 1639, he obtained a colonel's commission, and attended the king in both his expeditions to the north. When the Irish rebellion began in 1641, his services were so important, that the Lords Justices appointed him governor of Dublin.

On his return to England he was sent to relieve Nantwich, was taken prisoner by the army of the parliament, and sent to the Tower, where he remained till 1646. The royal cause being ruined, he obtained his liberty on condition of taking a command in Ireland, and soon concluded a peace with the rebels, for which the parliament passed upon him a vote of censure. Cromwell, however, made him lieutenant general, and gave him the chief command in Scotland. Monk distinguished himself at the battle of Dunbar, and afterwards in the war with the Dutch, for his successes in which he received great honours.

He resumed his command in Scotland. But the Protector had strong suspicions of Monk's sincerity; and not long before his death wrote him a letter, to which he added this postscript 'There be that toll me that there is a certain cunning fellow in Scotland, called George Monk, who is said to lie in wait there to introduce Charles Stuart; I pray you use your diligence to apprehend him and send him up to me. On the decease of the Protector, the resignation of power by his son, and the contest of parties which subsequently took place, Monk availed himself of the commanding situation which he occupied, to crush the republicans, and promote the recall and restoration of the Stuart family to the throne, in the person of Charles II.      
George Monk Duke of Albemarle was b. 6 Dec. 1608, 4th but 2nd surv. s. of Sir Thomas Monck (d.1629) of Potheridge by Elizabeth, da. of Sir George Smyth. of Heavitree, Devon. m. 23 Jan. 1653, Anne (d. 29 Jan. 1670), da. of John Clarges, farrier, of Drury Lane, Westminster, presumed wid. of Thomas Radford, milliner, of the New Exchange, Strand, Westminster, 2s. (1 d.v.p.) suc. bro. Thomas c.1647; KG 26 May 1660; cr. Duke of Albemarle 7 July 1660.
George Monck 1608-1670: Professional soldier who fought for both sides during the Civil Wars. He attained high office under Cromwell's Protectorate, then gained a dukedom by securing the Restoration of Charles II. He was born in the village of Potheridge near Torrington, Devon, the second son of an impoverished landowner. Aged 16 he beat up the Under-Sheriff of Devonshire who had arrested his father for debt, despite having accepted a bribe to postpone the arrest. Before he could be charged with assault, Monck joined the Duke of Buckingham's 1625 expedition to Cadiz and left the country. Two years later, he served on Buckingham's expedition to the Ile de Rhé. Monck distinguished himself by carrying a despatch from Buckingham to King Charles in England, sailing right under the guns of the French fleet off the Ile de Rhé.
In 1629 he joined the English volunteers fighting for the Prince of Orange against the Spanish in the Thirty Years' War. After nine years' service, he had risen to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He returned to England and joined King Charles' army in the second Bishops' War 1640. He fought at the battle of Newburn where his regiment was one of the few in the English army not to flee from the Scots. Monck saved the King's artillery and retreated with his men in good order to Newcastle.
On the outbreak of the Irish Uprising 1641, Monck fought for the King under the Earl of Ormond against the Irish Confederates. As colonel of Lord Leicester's regiment he gained a reputation for great energy and ruthlessness.
In 1643, John Pym wrote secretly to Monck, inviting him to join the Parliamentarian army. Ormond found out about the letter, arrested Monck and sent him in custody to England. At a personal audience with King Charles, Monck convinced the King of his loyalty and rejoined the Royalist forces that had come over from Ireland at the siege of Nantwich. When Sir Thomas Fairfax relieved Nantwich and defeated the Anglo-Irish Royalists in January 1644, Monck was taken prisoner. One of the few who refused to change sides, he was imprisoned in the Tower of London where he remained until the end of the first Civil War. During his imprisonment Monck met his future wife, Anne Clarges, who was reputedly working as a seamstress. They married in 1653. Monck also wrote his book Observations upon Political and Military Affairs which was published posthumously in 1671.
Upon his release from the Tower in November 1646, Monck took the Covenant and was appointed commander of Parliament's forces in Ireland, where he was confronted both by Ormond's Anglo-Irish Cavaliers and the Irish Confederates under Owen Roe O'Neill. He fought a successful defensive campaign against Ormond and O'Neill but his situation worsened after the execution of King Charles in 1649 when the Ulster Presbyterians rose in support of Charles II. When Ormond made peace with the Confederates, Monck feared that Ormond and O'Neill would join forces against him, so he signed a three-month armistice with O'Neill. The English government repudiated the armistice and Monck was summoned to London. He received a public reprimand from the Rump Parliament, but was exonerated from all accusations of disloyalty to the Commonwealth.
In 1650, Monck commanded a regiment under Cromwell in Scotland. He commanded the infantry at the battle of Dunbar and was appointed commander-in-chief in Scotland when Cromwell marched south against Charles II and the Covenanters in 1651. He continued the war against the Royalists and Covenaters in Scotland, capturing Stirling, Aberdeen and Dundee, where his troops looted the town and slaughtered 500 civilians.
In December 1652, Monck joined Blake and Deane as an admiral, or "General-at-Sea" in the first Anglo-Dutch War, playing a decisive role in the naval campaign of 1653. After Deane was killed at the battle of North Foreland and Blake was forced to return to England to recover from his wounds, Monck took command of the English warfleet, imposing a total blockade on Dutch ports. When the Dutch attempted to break the blockade in July 1653, Monck was victorious at the battle of Scheveningen, during which the Dutch admiral Maarten Tromp was killed.
Monck returned to Scotland in 1654 where he supressed the Earl of Glencairn's Royalist uprising and a Leveller conspiracy in his own army headed by his second-in-command, Colonel Robert Overton. This gave Monck an excuse for purging his army of all Anabaptists, Fifth Monarchists, and other "enthusiasts". Monck remained military commander in Scotland for the next five years. Despite rumours of his involvement in various Royalist conspiracies, Monck remained on friendly personal terms with Cromwell and unswervingly loyal to the Protectorate.
When Cromwell died in 1659, Monck declared his allegiance to his successor Richard Cromwell. He took no action in Scotland when Fleetwood and Desborough overthrew the Protector, or a few weeks later when Lambert and the republicans re-established the Rump. Representatives of Charles II made approaches to him in the summer of 1659, but Monck refused to commit himself. Finally in October 1659, he issued a declaration of support for the Rump after Sir Arthur Haselrig appealed to Army leaders to support Parliament against Lambert.
Lambert marched north against Monck, who played for time. When Lambert's army reached Newcastle, Monck entered into protracted negotiations with him. Faced with severe weather conditions, Lambert's army began to desert. Meanwhile the republicans in London restored the Rump and Lambert was forced to return south. Monck finally marched for London on 1 January 1660, arriving on 3 February. Even then, his intentions remained unclear until 1 May when he recommended that Parliament should invite Charles II to return. When the King landed at Dover on 25 May, Monck was the first to greet him as he came ashore.
Amongst other honours for his part in the Restoration, Monck was appointed Captain-General of the Army and created Duke of Albemarle. He played an active naval role in the second Dutch War 1665-7 but generally kept out of politics. He died on 3 January 1670, receiving a state funeral at the King's expense and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
generalmonck.com includes C.H. Firth's biography of Monck and excerpts from Monck's book Observations Upon Political and Military Affairs. George Monk Duke of Albemarle was also known as Monck in records. He was born on 8 December 1608 in Potheridge, Merton, Devon. He was described as the second son. He was the son of Sir Thomas Monk and Elizabeth Smith.
     George was educated. By his grandfather Sir George Smith with whom he almost entirely resided. He was mentioned in a deed dated 22 April 1616. 22 April 1616: Reversionary Lease for 99 years, 14 James I. - (1) John Chappell, Thomas Pope the elder, Valentyne Tedbury, Thomas Pope the younger, Humfry Cade, Robert Downe, Thomas Russell the elder, Willyam Hawkes the elder, Thomas Bennett and Marrys Oldon, feoffees of the parish lands of St Paul in Exeter.
(2) Sir George Smyth of Maydworthie, Knt.
2 messuages, curtilages, a stable and garden in the parish of St. Paul, Exeter.
Lives: George Monck, the son of Sir Thomas Monck, Knt. and John Smyth, the son of Sir Nicholas Smythe, Knt
Consideration: £10; Rent: 40s.
9 seals of which 2 are broken.
In reversion of Sir Nicholas Smyth, Knt (son of Sir George Smyth) and Dame Elizabeth, wife of Sir Thomas Monck and daughter of Sir Nicholas Smyth
.
George Monk Duke of Albemarle married Anne Clarges (Radford or Redford) on 23 January 1652/53 in St George's, Southwark, Surrey, England.
     George died sitting in his chair at his country seat on 3 January 1669/70 in Newhall, Essex, aged 61. He was buried on 29 April 1670 in Westminster Abbey, London. The Duke of Albemarle was laid in his vault Apr 29: his funerals were solemnized April 30. Footnote: George Monk, second son of Sir Thomas Monk, Kt, by Elizabeth daughter of Sir George Smith. He was born at Potheridge, co. Devon 6 Dec 1608, and for his well known services was created Duke of Albemarle 7 July 1660. He died the preceeding January. His will, dated 8 June 1665, was proved 3 January 1607/8, the very day of his death.

Mary Ann Monk

(1864 - 5 November 1935)
     Mary Ann Monk was born in 1864 in Surrey, England.
     Mary Ann Monk arrived per "Bebar" on 21 December 1883 at Adelaide, South Australia.
Mary Ann Monk married Richard Henry Ruby, son of Henry Ruby and Susanna May, on 1 November 1884 in Port Adelaide, South Australia.
     Mary died on 5 November 1935 in Northfield, South Australia.

Children of Mary Ann Monk and Richard Henry Ruby

Nicholas Monk Bishop of Hereford

(circa 1609 - 17 December 1661)
     Nicholas Monk Bishop of Hereford was born circa 1609 in Potheridge, Merton, Devon. Nicholas Moncke, third son of Sir Thomas Monk, of Potheridge, co. Devon, Kt, by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir George Smith. He appears to have been a quiet country clergyman, until the influence of his brother, the Duke of Albemarle, secured his rapid advancement. He became Provost of Eton College in June 1660, and on the 1st of August in that year was created D.D. at Oxford, by royal command. He was elected Bishop of Hereford 1 Dec. following, and was consecrated 31 Janaury 1660/1. His will, dated the day before his death, was proved 13 March 1661/2, by his relict Susannah, who was daughter of Thomas Payne, of Plymtree, Devon, Esq. by whom he left only two daughters, Mary & Elizabeth. A monument was erected in the Abbey to his memory, in 1723, by his grandson, Christopher Rawlinson, of Cork, co. Lancaster, Esq.]I]. He was the son of Sir Thomas Monk and Elizabeth Smith.
     Nicholas died at his lodgings in the Old Palace on 17 December 1661 in Soho, Westminster. He was buried on 20 December 1661 in Westminster Abbey, London.

Thomas Monk

(9 April 1607 - )
     Thomas Monk was christened on 9 April 1607 in Merton, Devon. He was the son of Sir Thomas Monk and Elizabeth Smith.

Sir Thomas Monk

(say 1550 - 1629)
     Sir Thomas Monk was born say 1550. He was described as the ancestor of General Monck, Duke of Albemarle. The hisory of Parliament states his life span as: (1570-1627).
Sir Thomas Monk married Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Sir George Smith, on 17 June 1601 in Merton, Devon. A Margerty Moncke married Thomas Wollicom there the same year.
     Sir Thomas Monk was mentioned in a deed dated 22 April 1616. 22 April 1616: Reversionary Lease for 99 years, 14 James I. - (1) John Chappell, Thomas Pope the elder, Valentyne Tedbury, Thomas Pope the younger, Humfry Cade, Robert Downe, Thomas Russell the elder, Willyam Hawkes the elder, Thomas Bennett and Marrys Oldon, feoffees of the parish lands of St Paul in Exeter.
(2) Sir George Smyth of Maydworthie, Knt.
2 messuages, curtilages, a stable and garden in the parish of St. Paul, Exeter.
Lives: George Monck, the son of Sir Thomas Monck, Knt. and John Smyth, the son of Sir Nicholas Smythe, Knt
Consideration: £10; Rent: 40s.
9 seals of which 2 are broken.
In reversion of Sir Nicholas Smyth, Knt (son of Sir George Smyth) and Dame Elizabeth, wife of Sir Thomas Monck and daughter of Sir Nicholas Smyth
.
     Thomas died in 1629 in Potheridge, Merton, Devon.

Children of Sir Thomas Monk and Elizabeth Smith

Dorothy Monkhouse

( - 1810)
     Dorothy Monkhouse was born in Bloan, Westmorland, England. She was described as "a most excellent & clever woman who brought her husband a pretty fortune".
Dorothy Monkhouse married Thomas Bowker, son of Thomas Bowker and (?) Brabbin, on 16 July 1754 in Kirkby Stephen, Westmorland.
     Dorothy died in 1810. At Whatton, near Morpeth, Dorothy, relict of Thos. Bowker, esq. of Deckham's-hall.

Children of Dorothy Monkhouse and Thomas Bowker

Andrew Monro

     Andrew Monro married Euphemia Dunbar, daughter of Sir James Dunbar, before 1520. Black Andrew "Beg", the Black Baron of Milntown (Kilmuir Easter), married Euphemia, a daughter of James Dunbar 1st of Tarbat, a son of Sir James Dunbar of Westfield in Moray, who had purchased in 1520 the lands of Portmahomack, Tarbatness & the old Ross Castle of Ballone which he brought up to date..

Children of Andrew Monro and Euphemia Dunbar

Sir George Monroe

      He was of Newmore. They had two sons and eight daughters..
Sir George Monroe married secondly Christiana Hamilton in 1649 in Coleraine, Londonderry, Ireland.

Mary Montfichet

     Mary Montfichet married Sir John Drummond, son of Malcolm Drummond and Unknown Graham. Mary Montfichet was the daughter of William Montfichet.

Child of Mary Montfichet and Sir John Drummond

William Montfichet

Child of William Montfichet

Aveline de Montfitchet

(circa 1200 - 1239)
     Aveline de Montfitchet was born circa 1200. She was the daughter of Richard Lord Monfitchet..
Aveline de Montfitchet married William de Fortibus, son of William de Fortibus Earl of Albemarle, Skipton and Hawise le Gros.
     Aveline died in 1239.

Child of Aveline de Montfitchet and William de Fortibus

Alice de Montfort

( - 1339)
     Alice de Montfort was born in Beaudesert, Warwickshire. She was the daughter of Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert.
Alice de Montfort married Warin de Lisle, son of Robert de Lisle and Mabel de Muscegros. Alice de Montfort was mentioned at the Inquisition Post Mortem held on 7 December 1296 on the death of Warin de Lisle. Writ 7 Dec 25 1296 Edward I: Suffolk: Inq. made at Semere on Wednesday after SS Fabian & Sebastian, Suffolk: Noddinge: The manor (extent given) held of the Bishop of Ely by service of 2 knights frees; and 4d ought to be paid yearly too the hundred of Cosford, and 3d to the parson of Bildeston. He demised the manor two years ago to Hervey de Stanton for life.
Inq. made at Fynebergh, 4 Jan 25 Edw I, 1296/7. The manor (extent given) wherof the said Warin de Insula and Alice his wife, who still survives, were enfeoffed jointly by one Nicholas de Charterey to them and the heirs of the said Warin and of the chief lords, viz. of the heirs of the Sir Robert de Mucegros, by service of a knights fee; and the said Alice remained in seisin with her husband until his death, and afterwards until the manor was taken into the King's hand. Robert his son, aged 6 years on the feast of Ss Fabian & Sebastian next, is his next heir.
Cambridge: Inq made at Cambridge on the day of St Thomas the Apostle, 25 Edw I. Rampstone. The manor (extent given) including rents at Wynepol pertaining thereto, the advowson of the church at Wynepole, and a fisher, held jointly as above, by the enfeoffment of the said Nicholas, of Geoffrey de Burdeleys by service of 1 3/4 knight's fee.
Cotenham. The manor held of the bishop of Ely by service of a moiety of a knight's fee.
Coveney with Maneye. The manor held in socage of the prior of Ely by service of 5sh. Heir as above.
Bedford: Inq. made at Sheford on Saturday after St Thomas the Apostle, 25 Edw I.
Kamelton. The manor (extent given), including 15 acres fo wood devastated in the time of the said Warin, held of the king in chief, as an escheat fo the lands etc late of the countess of Albemarle, by service of 1/2 knight's fee; and Nicholasd de Meperdeshale ought to received 2d yearly for 4 acres of meadow, and Nicholas Tuppeest (?) 2d. Heir as above, aged 6 years and more.
Writ (ad melius inquirendum) because by the previous inquisition it does not appear whether the manor of Kamelton was held of the dower of the countess of the lands late of William de Fortibus, her husband, or of the lands of her own inheritance, 25 June 25 Edw I.
Bedford: Inq. made at Sefford on Friday after Ss Peter & Paul, 25 Edw I.
Camelton. The said Warin held the manor of the escheat of the lands which were of the said countess, which she held of her own inheritance, by service of 1/2 knight's fee; and the countess held of the earl of Gloucester by the said service, as is believed, of 1/2 knight's fee
.
Alice, Warin's widow had dower assigned to her 18 Feb 1296/7.
Alice de Montfort married Robert FitzWalter after 10 May 1308. The grant was dated 10 May 1308, she was his 3rd wife..
Alice, relict of Warin afterwards married Sir Robert FitzWalter; in 1310 she had a third part of the manor of Nedging Sfk in dower in which year Robert obtained seisin of his father's lands having proved his age.
     Alice de Montfort travelled to Santiago, Spain, in 1315. She was going on a pilgrimage.
     Alice died in 1339. In 1317 she went abroad with her husband.

Children of Alice de Montfort and Warin de Lisle

Isabelle de Montfort

     Isabelle de Montfort was born in France. She was the daughter of Simon de Montfort, seigneur of Montfort-l'Aumery & Isabelle de Broyes, dame of Nogetn -le-Roi.
Isabelle de Montfort married Radulph/Ralph/Raoul (3) de Tosny Lord of Flamstead, son of Roger de Tosny the Spaniard and Godehildus/Gotelina de Unknown.

John de Montfort Baron, of Beaudesert

(circa 1261 - before 11 May 1296)
     John de Montfort Baron, of Beaudesert was born circa 1261. John appears to have been of age in 1284/5. He was the son of Piers de Montfort and Maud de la Mare.
     John died before 11 May 1296.

Juliana de Montfort

     Juliana de Montfort was the daughter of Thurstan Montfort and (?) de Cantelou.

Piers de Montfort

( - before 4 March 1286/87)
     Piers de Montfort was the son of Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert and Alice de Audley.
Piers de Montfort married Maud de la Mare, daughter of Henry de la Mare, circa 1260.
     Piers died before 4 March 1286/87. Sir Peter de Montfort and his wife, Alice de Audley, are the parents of the younger Sir Peter de Montfort (died 1287), whose wife, Maud de la Mare, has been the subject of other recent posts.

Child of Piers de Montfort and Maud de la Mare

Sir Piers de Montfort

( - before 21 November 1216)
     Sir Piers de Montfort was born. The Piers are muddled, needs more work. He was the son of Thurstan Montfort and (?) de Cantelou.
     Piers died before 21 November 1216.
Piers wrote to Walter de Merton, Chancellor 1261-63, about the business of (Walter de Cauntelo) Lord (Bishop) of Worcester, "avunculi nostri".

Child of Sir Piers de Montfort

Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert

(after 1210 - 4 August 1265)
     Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert was born after 1210. He was a minor at his father's death in 1216 and still under age in 1231. He was the son of Sir Piers de Montfort.
His wardship and marriage were granted by King John to William de Cauntelo. During his minority he had grants of markets at Henley and Beaudesert.
Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert married Alice de Audley circa 1228. He married in or before 1228 Alice, daughter of Henry de Audley ...
Alice survived him." The source cited in Complete Peerage for Alice de Audley having survived her husband is a Close Rolls item dated 50 Henry III (1265/6). That Alice de Montfort lived after this date is proved by several records found in the published rolls of Richard Gravesend, Bishop of Lincoln. These items show that Lady Alice de Montfort presented to the church of Ridlington, Rutland in 1266/7; to the church of Preston, Rutland in 1276/7; and and to church of Martinsthorp [Thorp Martin], Rutland in 1276/7 [see F.N. Davis, ed., Rotuli Ricardi Gravesend Episcopi Lincolniensis, A.D. 1258-1279 (Lincoln Rec. Soc. 20) (1925): 108, 130].
     Piers died on 4 August 1265 in Evesham, Worcestershire. At the battle of Evesham, where his sons were taken prisoner.

Child of Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert and Alice de Audley

Children of Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert

Robert de Montfort

     Robert de Montfort was the son of Sir Piers de Montfort Lord of Beaudesert.

William de Montfort

     William de Montfort was the son of Thurstan Montfort and (?) de Cantelou.

Augusta Georgina Montfort

(5 October 1813 - 30 December 1911)
     Augusta Georgina Montfort was born on 5 October 1813 in Athboy, Meath, Ireland. She was the fourth daughter of Harman Montfort (1785-1831) and Georgina Augusta Little (1791-1854) who married in 1807 and had at least 10 children of whom some died young. She was christened on 10 October 1813 in Athboy.
Augusta Georgina Montfort married Gustavus Drake Handcock, son of Rev Thomas Handcock MA and Olivia Potts, on 12 August 1841 in Athboy, Meath.
     Augusta's death was registered in the quarter ending on 30 December 1911 in Wexford RD, Wexford, Ireland.
Henry & Ann Montfort wrote: They lived at Clondelever, near Mullingar but her grandfather, Henry Montfort (1741-1817) had leased a property called Frayne Castle, near Athboy, County Meath.

Children of Augusta Georgina Montfort and Gustavus Drake Handcock

Thurstan Montfort

(circa 1184 - between July 1216 and 21 November 1216)
      John Ravilious wrote: Certainly there is other evidence of a close relationship between the Montforts of Beaudesert and the Cantelou family; some of which does not immediately lend itself to assuming a marital or blood relationship, including the acquisition of the wardship of young Piers de Montfort by William de Cantelou following his father's death before 21 Nov. 1216. However, the long-term relationship between the family members, dating throught the turbulent period of the 1260's down to the Battle of Evesham in 1265, bears all the hallmarks of a familial relationship which the above statement by Piers de Montfort appears to finally resolve.
The existence of this relationship, while not identified in othercontemporaneous records to date, is supported by the writings of Adam Marsh in the 1250's. Margaret Howell wrote, concerning the aftermath of the June 1252 trial of Simon de Montfort, ' According to Adam Marsh, the three men on whose support Montfort could rely unfailingly were Peter de Montfort (not a relative), Walter Cantilupe bishop of Worcester, and Peter of Savoy. Peter de Montfort and Cantilupe were closely tied into Simon's affinity.... ' [1]
Given the birth range for Thurstan de Montfort (ca. 1184, as he was a minor on his father's death ca. 1199, with King John taking his homage in 1205 - with the proviso he demise his lands temporarily to William de Cantelou ! CP Vol. IX, p. 130-131) and his son Piers (after Oct. 1210), it is clear that Thurstan's wife was a sister of William de Cantelou 'the younger' and Walter de Cantelou, and not a niece. Walter de Cantelou was then uncle ['avunculus'] to Piers de Montfort, and not a great-uncle as might otherwise be theorised.
Ravilious outlines the relationships now evident between the Cantelou, Longchamp, Montfort (Beaudesert) and other families down to the 'daughtering-out' of the senior line of the Cantelous of Aston Cantlow, co. Warwick. Thurstan Montfort was born circa 1184. He was a minor on his father's death ca. 1199, with King John taking his homage in 1205 - with the proviso he demise his lands temporarily to William de Cantelou ! CP Vol. IX, p. 130-131) and his son Piers (after Oct. 1210), it is clear that Thurstan's wife was a sister of William de Cantelou 'the younger' and Walter de Cantelou, and not a niece. Walter de Cantelou was then uncle ['avunculus'] to Piers de Montfort, and not a great-uncle as might otherwise be theorised.
Thurstan Montfort married (?) de Cantelou, daughter of William de Cantelou, circa 1209. He possibly married a daughter of William de Cauntelo the elder, steward of the household to King John. His son Piers wrote to Walter de Merton, Chancellor 1261-63, about the business of (Walter de Cauntelo) Lord (Bishop) of Worcester, "avunculi nostri".
Carl Boyer 3rd`s Medieval English Ancestors of certain Americans (p 156) that He thought that Sir Peter I de Montfort`s father Sir Thurstan de Montfort who was a minor in 1199 and granted his land by King John in 1205 did so with the condition that the said Sir Thurstan should lease his land for two years to the King`s steward William I de Cantelou, who was father to William II de Cantelou who married Millicent de Gournay in 1213. Boyer suggests that Sir Thurstan de Montfort may have married an unidentified daughter of William I de Cantelou based on the King`s making the lease a condition of his granting Sir Thurstan his land.
     Thurstan died between July 1216 and 21 November 1216.

Children of Thurstan Montfort and (?) de Cantelou

Alexander Montgomerie Lord of Ardrossan

(1429 - circa 1470)
     Alexander was a Privy Counsellor. He was born in 1429. He was the son of Sir John Montgomery (of Ardrossan) and Margaret Maxwell.
Alexander Montgomerie Lord of Ardrossan married Margaret Boyd, daughter of Sir Thomas Boyd. The Lords Montgomerie before the creation of the Earldom of Eglintoun.
A. Alexander, First Lord Montgomerie (1429-1470) married Margaret, second daughter of Sir Thomas Boyd of Kilmarnock, father of the first Lord Boyd, and by her had four sons and three daughters.
1. Alexander, Master of Montgomerie (see B)
2. George, ancestor of the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie
3. John (designed John de Montgomerie of Griffen)
4. Thomas, Parson of Eaglesha
5. Margaret, married John Stewart of Darnley, afterwards created Lord Darnley, and who became the Earl of Lennox.
6. Elizabeth, who married John, second Lord Kennedy
7. Agnes married William Cunningham of Glengarnock.
B. Alexander, Master of Montgomerie, Eldest son of First Lord (1430-1452) married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Adam Hepburn of Hailes, and by her had:
1. Alexander, second Lord Montgomerie married Catherine Kennedy 2. Robert of Braidstone 3. Hugh of Hesilheid 4. Margaret became 2nd wife of Alexander, First Lord Home. Their eldest son was Thomas Home of Langshaw.
     Alexander died circa 1470.

Child of Alexander Montgomerie Lord of Ardrossan and Margaret Boyd

Anne Montgomerie (Cunningham)

     Anne Montgomerie (Cunningham) was the daughter of Sir John Montgomery (of Ardrossan) and Margaret Maxwell.

Hugh Montgomerie

     Hugh Montgomerie was the son of Sir John Montgomery (of Ardrossan) and Margaret Maxwell.

Margaret Montgomerie Countess of Lennox

(after 1430 - )
     Margaret Montgomerie Countess of Lennox was born after 1430. She was the daughter of Alexander Montgomerie Lord of Ardrossan and Margaret Boyd.
     A contract for the marriage of Margaret Montgomerie Countess of Lennox and John Stewart Earl of Lennox was signed on 15 May 1438 in Houston, Renfrewshire, Scotland.
Margaret Montgomerie Countess of Lennox married John Stewart Earl of Lennox, son of Sir Alan Stewart and Catherine Seton (Stewart) (Maxwell), in 1438.

Children of Margaret Montgomerie Countess of Lennox and John Stewart Earl of Lennox

Robert Montgomerie