James Reddish

(1811 - before 4 October 1812)
     James Reddish was born illegitimate in 1811 in Falmouth, Trelawney parish, Jamaica. He was the son of Samuel Reddish and J Cranston. James Reddish was christened on 30 September 1812 in Trelawney parish, Jamaica. James Reddish mustee son of R Cranston, free quadroon & Samuel Reddish esq.deceased, aged 1 year..
     James died before 4 October 1812 in Trelawney parish, Jamaica. He was buried on 4 October 1812 in Trelawney parish, Jamaica. James Reddish, mustee free child was buried.

James Reddish

(28 July 1776 - 1 March 1777)
     James Reddish was born on 28 July 1776 in London. He was the son of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello. James Reddish was christened on 6 October 1776 in St George Bloomsbury, London. James, son of Samuel Reddish and Mary Anne his wife.
     James died on 1 March 1777. He was buried on 5 March 1777 in London. James Reddish, Gt Russell St.

Jane Reddish

(circa 1811 - )
     Jane Reddish was born circa 1811 in Falmouth, Trelawney parish, Jamaica. She was the daughter of Samuel Reddish. Jane Reddish was christened on 7 November 1816 in Trelawney parish, Jamaica. Jane Reddish, free mustee, aged 5 years..

Mary Reddish

(6 January 1803 - 26 September 1881)
Mary Reddish (Davies) taken in Sydney
     Mary Reddish was born on 6 January 1803 in Bridgetown, Barbados. Mary Reddish daughter of Samuel Reddish of the parish of St Michael in the island of Barbadoes & Dorothy his wife, born the 6th of January 1803 at 36 minutes past 6 in the evening. She was the daughter of Samuel Reddish and Dorothy Ashby. Mary Reddish was christened on 26 May 1803 in St Michael, Bridgetown, Barbados.
     Mary Reddish married Rev Thomas Davies on 30 June 1834 in Montego Bay, St James parish, Jamaica. She states in her family bible: The abovesaid Mary Reddish married to the Revd Thomas Davies June 30th 1834 at the church of Montego Bay in Jamaica.
     Jan 12th 1835? "Extracts from a Barbados paper sent me by S A" Marriages - On the 30th June last, at Montego Bay, Jamaica, by the Revd John McIntyre, Rector, the Revd Thomas Davies, to Mary, only child of the late Samuel Reddish Esq. late controller? of customs, Falmouth, Jamaica and formerly comptroller of this post.
     We received yesterday a pile of Jamaican papers (the Cornwall Chronicle) of old date by the mail boat via St Thomas. Looking over the births, marriages and deaths we found the above. The accomplished and esteemable lady whose marriage is there announced is a grand-daughter of the late John Lewis Ashby Esq. of this island, and kin of Nathan Ashby Esq. at present Comptroller of Montego Bay Jamaica. The Bride's father Mr Reddish was half-brother of the late Right Hon. George Canning..
     Mary Reddish received a letter dated 2 January 1845. Letter postmarked Kingston, Ja 2 1845 addressed to The Revd T Davis, Montego Bay P O, from the Kingston P.O. 2.28.45.
Letter from Bishop's Lodge, 10 Dec 1845: My dear Madam, I am sure that you will permit me to claim your kind interposition to convey to the Ladies of the Church Bazaar Committee my warmest thanks for their benevolence to me and for the ... which your letter implies of their abundant ... for the ... of our God,
sincerely believing at the ... that the daughter...
. She was widowed on 15 March 1852 on the death of her husband Rev Thomas Davies.
     In her diary dated August 1852 it was recorded: The question as to a home was decided, a skilful physician a kind and friendly surgeon had equally come to the conclusion that the climate of Brighton? would not suit my mother - what then was to be done? Barbadoes, with the friendly, social people was too warm, Jamaica, Earth's paradise as to natural advantages, was too ... and too degen.., Madeira too expensive for poor people a Catholic country too and ... where a school mistress aught not be ... and while a widow's son might find no opening for his energies no ... for his inde... Australia the modern El Dorado seemed to offer the best prospects even to us so that... ... our dear friend Mr ... this conviction he daily strove to impress upon my mother's friends. When she shrank from accounting/encountering the difficulties of a strange land and? became nervous from the apparition of traversing the torrid zone our ... ... tried early... in turn to bring her to his opinion which at length she agreed with him, that it would be desirable for me to see the famous? ... Miss Chisholm, and leave ... for the inc... vessels equipped by the Family Colonisation Society might approach the comforts ... to an... and the ... respectability indispensable for gentlewomen.
     The morning the bustle and the ... of the ... was.. s... I was dis... from the Waterloo Station located in a .. ... and .. ...a fine ...to... the end of July ... .. at ... at an insignificant street in Islington at which ... the ... before was had attended with anxious hearts to hear the verdict which this lady prov... upon this prospect and chance of success. I had expected to see a respectable ... son and to be received by our ... ... on her the ... of gentlewoman I was disappointed, a shabby dirty old woman answered my knock and ushered me into a parlour which seemed to have been long ... to any ... in the house maids labours. This was Mrs Chisholm's office. In a s.. ... the lady made her appearance she was dressed in black, and her hair drawn straight back from her forehead showed the whole extent of a heavy Chinese looking face. Pa... she listened to the detail of any ... and wishes or the subject of our acc.. ... and then she began to speak and to smile and the s... was like a sunbeam lightening and beautifying her face _ which before wasto ... To my enquiry whether the plan of the Society's ships admitted of additional space and comfort being had for additional expense Mrs Chisholm said she thought they did and ... ... see to ... sl.. then and fitting at the East India Docks after which she would see me again. To the East India Docks I therefore ... and after up and ... and in and out in every imaginable direction we ...search .. was at that ... to ... the Chalmers lay - crowds of dirty looking people were going in and out of her and unnoticed and unaided my child and I made our way among the throng. And was it in such a den as this that we are to make our home was the question I asked myself as with difficulty we progressed among open hatches and carpenters tools. The question was only to be solved in the negation and the following evening punctual to my appointment, I was at Charlton Crescent just as the clock struck six. and thought the lady will have been put off the Official and be disencumbered of the d..t and shreds by which she was surrounded - vain hopes - the Portress, the little parlour and Mrs Chisholm herself was just as I had seen them before - and after a little ineffectual talk and a direction to see the Ballenglish which was outfitting at Southampton I took my leave of the originator of the Family Colonisation Society. No practicable effort was to be ... which might further the great object we had in view. To Southampton therefore we went and to the Bellenglish which we found very superior in size and accommodation to the Chalmers. My tale was told - accommodation was ... for an invalid lady who had been accustomed to comfort and could not be ...ed as the emigrants generally were. The owner or the agents were all accommodation - such a case had never before come under their notice but they did not think there would be any objection to their meeting our needs. The owner Mr. T with bustling and good natured alacrity led us into two cabins opening into the saloon which he said might be spared we could have these, doubtless there could be no other passengers in that part of the ship, so that we should have the saloon to ourselves except when the officers were at their meals, and if we could be satisfied with the ships fare the expenses could be supposed be moderate.
The prospect was delightful. I left the Ballenglish full of hope and after one or two days more in London to show my child those great national monuments of Westminster Abbey and St Pauls returned to the sweet and pleasant home in which I had so lately entered and which I was so soon to leave.
Oh how disappointing are the hopes of Earths - How is that hope depends which maketh the heart seek sweet though sad had been the ... with which but there I had taken this lovely house it is f... token comfort it that long been my hearts fond ... to ... was ...in the Bristol Vol His letter just ... from the calls of mortality. Got he had left ... ius a legacy the support the ta.. the .. of his three children and the comfort of their dear mother. He had sacrificed every thing to me - was altogether dependant .. the remaining years of his existence - and fondly though painfully were whose remaining bonds to life interwoven with the b... so painfully discovered, which had first found me to this quiet secluded spot. cherished hopes - it remained only to pay bills, to extricate myself from a years engagements for ... to pack up that ought well be taken, to sacrifice what has been ... bought - to plant flowers over the graves so the departed and ... to .. to the stranger land.

     Mary Reddish and Margaret Herbert Davies arrived per "Washington Irving" on 12 December 1852 at Victoria, Australia. They were cabin passengers on the Washington Irving which departed 3 Sep 1852: Mary Davis aged 49, Dorothy Reddish aged 69, Mary Davis aged 23, Maria H Davis aged 13, Felix Geo Davis aged 15. Steerage: Ann Davis, aged 30, domestic, no nationality. The family story was that they were accompanied by a black servant Ann Wills. On the 26 January 1895 the Australasian & The Argus reported the death of: Wilson - On the 20th inst., at her cottage, North Williamstown, in the 75th year of her age Ann Shene Wilson (Wils), for upwards of 30 years a faithful, honoured, and much loved servant in the family of Mrs Hume Black and Mrs William Dempster. The Victorian BDM indexes show that she was aged 77, no parents listed. She was buried at Williamstown 22 Jan 1895 as Ann Wilson

     Her diary: The question as to a home was decided, a skilful physician a kind and friendly surgeon had equally come to the conclusion that the climate of Brighton?? (Barbadoes??) would not suit my mother - what then was to be done? Barbadoes, with the friendly, social people was too warm, Jamaica, Earth's paradise as to natural advantages, was too ... and too degen.., Madeira too expensive for poor people a Catholic country too and ... where a school mistress aught not be ... and while a widow's son might find no opening for his energies no ... for his inde... Australia the modern El Dorado seemed to offer the best prospects even to us so that... ... our dear friend Mr ... this conviction he daily strove to impress upon my mother's friends. When she shrank from accounting/encountering the difficulties of a strange land and? became nervous from the apparition of traversing the torrid zone our ... ... tried early ... in turn to bring her to his opinion which at length she agreed with him, that it would be desirable for me to see the far ... Miss Chisholm, and leave ... for the inc... vessels equipped by the Family Colonisation Society might approach the comforts ... to an... and the ... respectability indispensable for gentlewomen.
     
     The morning the bustle and the ... of the ... was.. s... I was dis... from the Waterloo Station located in a .. ... and .. ...a fine ...to... the end of July ... .. at ... at an insignificant street in Islington at which ... the ... before was had attended with anxious hearts to hear the verdict which this lady prov... upon this prospect and chance of success. I had expected to see a respectable ... son and to be received by our ... ... on her the ... of gentlewoman I was disappointed, a shabby dirty old woman answered my knock and ushered me into a parlour which seemed to have been long ... to any ... in the house maids labours. This was Mrs Chisholm's office. In a s.. ... the lady made her appearance she was dressed in black, and her hair drawn straight back from her forehead showed the whole extent of a heavy Chinese looking face. Pa... she listened to the detail of any ... and wishes or the subject of our acc.. ... and then she began to speak and to smile and the s... was like a sunbeam lightening and beautifying her face _ which before wasto ... To my enquiry whether the plan of the Society's ships admitted of additional space and comfort being had for additional expense Mrs Chisholm said she thought they did and ... ... see to ... sl.. then and fitting at the East India Docks after which she would see me again. To the East India Docks I therefore ... and after up and ... and in and out in every imaginable direction we ...search .. was at that ... to ... the Chalmers lay - crowds of dirty looking people were going in and out of her and unnoticed and unaided my child and I made our way among the throng. And was it in such a den as this that we are to make our home was the question I asked myself as with difficulty we progressed among open hatches and carpenters tools. The question was only to be solved in the negation and the following evening punctual to my appointment, I was at Charlton Crescent just as the clock struck six. and thought the lady will have been put off the Official and be disencumbered of the d..t and shreds by which she was surrounded - vain hopes - the Portress, the little parlour and Mrs Chisholm herself was just as I had seen them before - and after a little ineffectual talk and a direction to see the Ballenglish which was outfitting at Southampton I took my leave of the originator of the Family Colonisation Society. No practicable effort was to be ... which might further the great object we had in view. To Southampton therefore we went and to the Bellenglish which we found very superior in size and accommodation to the Chalmers. My tale was told - accommodation was ... for an invalid lady who had been accustomed to comfort and could not be ...ed as the emigrants generally were. The owner or the agents were all accommodation - such a case had never before come under their notice but they did not think there would be any objection to their meeting our needs. The owner Mr. T with bustling and good natured alacrity led us into two cabins opening into the saloon which he said might be spared we could have these, doubtless there could be no other passengers in that part of the ship, so that we should have the saloon to ourselves except when the officers were at their meals, and if we could be satisfied with the ships fare the expenses could be supposed be moderate.


     The prospect was delightful. I left the Ballenglish full of hope and after one or two days more in London to show my child those great national monuments of Westminster Abbey and St Pauls returned to the sweet and pleasant home in which I had so lately entered and which I was so soon to
leave.

     Oh how disappointing are the hopes of Earths - How is that hope depends which maketh the heart seek sweet though sad had been the ... with which but there I had taken this lovely house it is f... token comfort it that long been my hearts fond ... to ... was ...in the Bristol Vol His letter just ... from the calls of mortality. Got he had left ... ius a legacy the support the ta.. the .. of his three children and the comfort of their dear mother. He had sacrificed every thing to me - was altogether dependant .. the remaining years of his existence - and fondly though painfully were whose remaining bonds to life interwoven with the b... so painfully discovered, which had first found me to this quiet secluded spot. cherished hopes - it remained only to pay bills, to extricate myself from a years engagements for ... to pack up that ought well be taken, to sacrifice what has been ... bought - to plant flowers over the graves so the departed and ... to .. to the stranger land.


     On the 10th of August my mother having p... for ... was under the care of a
valued relative - my children, my faithful servant and myself took our places in the train and after a day gl... and b... a mthe moral ... of our existence found
ourselves at N.. the High Street... friends been expecting us. A nights bed at a good hotel had sufficiently refreshed us so well ...to toil and b. .. - and at
eleven the next day I started accompanied by G to the accommodations we had bespoken aboard the Ballenglish. Had I dreamt before or was I dreaming ... the whole arrangement was entirely changed the accommodation between the chief cabin, and ... quarters was cut off by a Jac... the more.... had been diminished by several berths being taken from it - an at the door of the room which was our sitting and eating as well as our sleeping room a step and ... ladder led down to the passengers decks.


     Our party could hold no communication with the Deck except by going down one steep and .. ladder, and ascending another an arrangement which could ... our visiting it difficult to a fact .. but impossible to my mother. On ....ing to
the agent's and other corrected the injustice done to our party by the change
they admitted that it was not to be justified but seemed to leave no ... to rectify it. They would make application - in London and I should receive an answer at an appointed time, two or three days distant. On the day appointed I returned accompanied by my kind and dear N and by my other clerical cousin Dr N at the office where I saw young Chisholm, from whom I could get no satisfactory answer but on board the Ballenglish I saw many various other gentlemen. The agent Mr Hodd... and the pleasant friendly old Scotch gentleman whom I had before seen and who was owner of the vessel. He looked gruff and displeased on this occasion but I ... my cause was right and felt no way discouraged. I was ushered into the d... cabin whose dimensions ... barely admitted of the central table with seats round it, at which our party were soon arranged and I opened my case in from.. - after a courteous and attentive hearing the justice of my complaint was admitted, and as it seemed that the change had been affected by an authority which was not to be overrided they consented to refund the deposit money £81.0.0 and Mr T Immediately wrote out a draft for the amount on a Southampton House. I then asked by what ... a change had been mad e which entailed upon me so much disappointment and ... less expense, and tow or three voices answered by Mrs Chisholm - Yes said the old Scotch gentleman whose apparent displeasure had quite vanished on my plain statement - it was Mrs Chisholm who came down and herself chalked out all the alteration. It was vexatious that this female philanthropist whose exertions had been employed on so large a ... for the accommodation of the fellow creatures should have ... opposed to ... edly to the arrangements which I had ent... for our comfort -and the s... so us I had full detailed to her my mother's precarious state of health and the necessity ... of ...ing her as much as possible against the inconveniences of an emigrant ship. But vexatious as it might be there was no remedy for it but in seeking some other mode of conveyance and as there was not prospect of another vessel from Southampton for several weeks our . ... seemed to be to proceed to London where there were always to be found vessels of every sort for Australia. A few days longer we remained that my children might enjoy the pleasant sea breeze and some about the ent ... neighbourhood of Southampton.
We spent a happy Sabbath ... attending morning and evening the Primitive Chapel built into the city wall and formerly attended solely by the French Protestants and known as the Maison de Dieu. The midday service is still performed there weekly in French but there is now a faithful English rector over its little ernest congregation. This gentleman was absent on an excursion and had appointed our dear N his deputy - and it was very sweet to us to listen to the precious talks and ... of his God's holy word, from his lips in the primitive and secluded place where the utter simplicity of the building and the devotion of the small body of worshippers who filled it seemed to belong to ... the early ages of Christianity than to our present bustling worldly days and generation. A pleasant afternoon was also spent in visiting N... Abbey - a beautiful and excursion about three miles from Southampton - and about unrivalled in England as specimens of the ancient Monastic edifices - Artists were scattered about taking sketches and adding by their appearance to the picturesque appearance of the ruins they were endeavouring to describe. The soft light of evening was streaming through beautiful ..th.. arches in some places perfect while others broken down and ... by the destroying ... while trees apparently of ancient growth t.. up a ... to the height of the walls, showed how long they had usurped their places as tenants of the roofless apartments. It was a lovely spot on which seemed in sweet accordance with a sorrow stricken spirit - while to the young and joyous it seemed to say - How beautiful is Earth with its records of the past with its joyous anticipations for the future. But we would not linger there for the busy realities of life were demanding my ... and away from Nethey Abbey away from Southampton its pleasant bay.... ooded shores and the busy ... hanging .. away once more into the noisy shrieking train and one more to London. after a fortnight spent in seeking a more eligible conveyance and making preparations for our voyage we embarked on the 3rd September on board the Washington Irving for Melbourne. Even at the place of embarkation the sickening contrast between an emigrant ship and these is which our foreign voyages had been made was forced upon us. We had been told that the ship would leave ... Basin at 4 o'clock we had therefore hastened there at 2 o'clock we had ... on the edge of the dock surrounded by our baggage for about four hours before the vessel appeared insight, gradually the throng around us had thickened ... of baggage had been piled around ours or which we were p .... old by the .... we must keep a watchful eye until our position became anxious .. as distasteful ... At length the ship became stationary just opposite to the spot at which my mother had long been sitting his her cab and then we hoped that some effort would be made to get us on board. But ... the dirty and clamorous ... through the side of that .. there seemed no thought but of themselves and the officials who .. and ... upon her decks then ... no reason ... that ... the party of ladies sho... paid our ... on the faith of finding comfort and consideration occupants of the second saloon. of the l... orders ... to the .... and others who had not c... that claim .... ships ladder along the side of the vessel and it seemed as if we were expected to do likewise - at length a handsome young Scotchman who had been holding ... with my mother and aunt? at the door of the ... into the c... of the vessel ... that he would obtain
alternative for us and after another half hour of ... waiting the ... daily meeting place and since then ... to my mother's comfort. and being lowered from the yard arm my mother, my two daughters and myself .... into the vessel. The chair we .ay sailed to such a .. was th.. was used for any other females who might have .... in their favour while my ... faithful and .... was told to climb up the sides as others had done. On board all was clamour and confusion of the ... two of the three. and we had difficulty in finding the cabin assigned to our party whose weary and disquieted we ... to our beds and did not rise until the ship had left Shadwell basin and was wending her way towards the mouth of the Thames.

     "Thous hast dealt bountifully with thy servant" was the feeling which was to my lips the next morning when . of the breakfast tell S ... the handsome and
spacious saloon a good breakfast had been served up and two or three quite manly looking persons were already seated at it giving a promise of ... table association - and when I .... the prospective comforts of our present situation with those which the Ballenglish offered I felt that I had indeed been guided by a better judgement than my own. As the day proceeded the throng seemed to .. the deck was crowded with dirty looking people whose mere approach and assumption of equality and good fellowship ... our indulging as we ... might a desire to watch the shores of England. Still we made intimate acquaintance with the sea ... of S.... which is rather pretty? these days I am as sick an many others back on shore and .... sundry articles for us. Had we known had barely second cabin passengers in the W. I. were furnished with necessities for comfort and decency our purchases would have been much more e.... After anchoring there for some hours we again weighed anchor and proceeded to Gravesend where we remained for the next tide. There a fresh crowd joined the ship which seemed before over full. Amongst the new arrivals was a rather handsome bold looking woman in a Bloomer ..t who struck me at first as being a Frenchwoman but soon the ... accents of Cockney .. flowed from her tongue in tones most audible as she h... to fro the space between her berth in a cabin adjoining ours at one end of the saloon and a ... cabin occupied by eight gentlemen at the other. Happy woman thought I you have a dear brother, a loved companion and protector in this conc... group and your are naturally anxious to secure his comforts. Alas painfully but steadily grew upon me the conviction that a conviction of a different sort excited ... the parties, and that any association between this
female, and those of my own party would be degrading to us in the highest degree.

     I must ever remember one anchorage off Gravesend with feelings of no ordinary nature. There we lay dulling the long hours of a beautiful Summer's Sabbath. The church bells sounded sweetly in our ears, but their invitation was not for us. There was no accommodation ladder to ascend and descend from the ship and although hundreds of visitors came on board many of them females the ... seemed to me neither safe nor dec.. We heard that a clergyman would come on board for the performance of divine service but no such welcome visitor appeared; in his stead were the officials of ... Marslak > Ed.ridge setting disputed ... and bringing forward unpaid bills of lading. The day was to be in great measure one of pounds, shillings and pence. Gold and silver rattled on the table and God's holy Sabbath was in all ppearances given to Mammon, by those who were about to traverse the might deep to shout one ration of prospect of safety save in the protection of that ar.. power they ... defying. Oh, why should these things be. How is it that ... weekly if not off.. go in professing .. to the Thr.. of Gods - and there declaring his dependence on Him. his protective, and yet when embarking on a situation of danger provoke them to anger by a direct violation of His commands "Remember thou the Sabbath day to keep it holy"


[:TAB:]Monday 6th Sept: On rising I went up to the poop deck and at the top of the
companion ladder, I was accosted by a Frenchman, Francois by name with whom I had had some conversation on religious subjects on the previous days, as follows. Madame, seroit il p... je l'ai ende.. dire qu'il y a quelqu ... de mort. Je Neu ai ... was my answer but I was long to remain in ignorance. What a shocking occurrence, was .. addressed by another passenger who came up to me at the next moment. I looked surprised - have you not heard that the Head .. has hanged himself: It was indeed awfully true - the man who was a tall elderly man with an ... of countenance had it appeared come on board in rather a dejected state, the bustle the confusion of the preceding days had overpowered him, some petty thefts which had occurred for which he had been severely taken to task by the Captain at a late hour of the night had increased his perplexity and unable to bear the discomforts of his present situation, he had rushed to meet the judgements of his offended God. How differently might the day have begun to him if the Sabbath had been properly regarded instead of ... into it more business? than could have been ... performed even in one week day - we had been soothed and tranquillised by its Holy duties - and had spent its closing hours in seeking as a body His holy protection who alone cold enable us to dwell in safety during our journey across the great deep.


     The body of the wretched man was left in its position until we should reach Deal where having been inspected by persons from the shore and a verdict passed upon the ... into canvas, and lowered into the deep. The horror of this whole transaction was ... to us by the fact that the sounds of music singing up from the steerage passengers were no way interrupted by it, and the evening closed in as much apparent merriment as those which had preceded it. Deal is rather a pretty town, and near it is Walmers Castle, a seat of the Duke of Wellington. Some of the young men of the 3rd cabin had gone to shore for a f... visit my Scotch friend Mr Robertson among them and were very nearly left behind. Mr R who had bought us a beautiful nosegay from Gravesend, came into the cabin, came into the saloon with a bunch of England.... it is a stupid place said he, I could get no flowers for you but these. It was a simple attention but long were these last flowers from England cherished and they would doubtly have been just ... by my children as cherished .. had not our matter of fact steward grown weary of seeing them and thrown them when they were quite withered.


     On the following morning (Sept 7) we had last sight of land. The party was now assembled and we could judge what our society was to be. Besides our own family ten gentlemen were to be occupants of the .... saloon, they were the most of them rather prepossessing in appearance and ... ... over singularly handsome and there was nothing apparently ... trouble among them. Besides the female before alluded to - a Scotch woman of very medium appearance had a sleeping place in an adjoining cabin, but wit ... f these were to be in the cabin by day - and we had our female fellow passenger, a young simple Scotch girl. I congratulated myself on the prospect of pleasant society during our long voyage but my anticipations had in store a grievous and unlooked for disappointment. Mean time I found that however comfortable I might be in the saloon there was no chance of enjoyment on the Deck. Delightful it had even been to see without to enjoy the freshness of the sea breeze and to gaze on the majesty of ocean beautiful and sublime its ever varying aspects a something too there is in the .. of one's .. on a sea voyage different to and far more gl.... than the feeling of everyday life on shore. The entire cessation of petty calls and vexations, the rest from rhouging... the absence of daily provedencey of "the meat that perished" all this leaves the mind at rest - while the .. of the land and the friends we have left made dearer by .. sh.. ... with sweet and soothing power. Again the untried future fo the land we are about to visit is never devoid of interest even to the heart weary and heavy laden with the burden of sorrow. Hope now has some cheering whisper of the days to come. But [To be cont.]
. Mary was a teacher at her private school, Williamstown, Victoria. It was reported in the Early history of Williamstown, by Wilson Evans in the Williamstown chronicle (no date supplied) p. 2: Early the next year (1856) Signor Carandini joined Mrs Davies Ladies School at Abraham's Cottage near the Bank of Australasia. Carandini taught deportment, callisthenics and dancing.
     In his book he recorded: Mrs Davies at her college in Aitken St guaranteed a "good female education".
     Advertisements in the Williamstown chronicle:
     10 January 1857: Education - Mrs Davies begs to announce that her school will re-open (DV) on Monday 12 January next, Clarke's Cottage, Newtown, Williamstown. Mrs Hugh McDougall, pupil of the Royal Academy, Professor of Singing and Music, begs to announce that she will hold a class for singing at Mrs Davies' School, Clarke's Cottage, Newtown, after the Christmas recess. Parents and guardians desirous of availing themselves of this opportunity are requested to make early application to Mrs Davies, as the terms for the ensuing quarter will be regulated by the number of pupils.
     14 January 1860: Educational - Mrs Davies begs to announce that to meet the wishes of her friends, and of parents and guardians generally, she has removed her schoolrooms from her residence to 15 Cole Street, nearly opposite the New Post Office, where her school duties will be resumed (DV) on Tuesday 10th January. Aubrey Cottage, Dec 24 1859.
     Mary mentioned her son George in letters dated Jan 12 1863 "my only son 850 miles away", May 19 1865 " received 17 guineas from her son", Dec 25 1868? "self willed son is still at the diggings".
     Mary Reddish received a letter dated 10 August 1865. She received a letter postmarked Au 10 1865 addressed to Mrs Davies, Aubrey Cottage, Williamstown and another implying she was staying at South Yarra but sent to Williamstown from Elise Darling, Collins St & Government House (wife of Sir Charles).
     Mary Reddish made a will dated 15 November 1865 in Williamstown. Mary Davies of Williamstown, Victoria, widow. I give .... unto my son George Felix Davies for his absolute use and benefit but subject to mortgages payable on my real estate ... all the personal estate to my two daughters Margaret & Maria in equal shares... my son in law William Dempster executor.
     Mary wrote on Eaglefield Pastoral Company Ltd letterhead (Her son in law was manager of Eaglefield, Qld): An autobiography - I was born at Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados ... 6th Jany 1803 as my dear mother often related afterwards on the 6th day of the year, the 6th day of the month, the 6th day of the week at 36 mins past 6 p.m. might not have been expected from such a coincidence some thing else happened at the same time, a man guilty of some evil deeds in the island had been sentenced to death, a delay occurred in the execution of the sentence of heavy & rain, and people began to say that the rain would never stop until he has . His doom was fixed for the 6th Jany., he mounted the scaffold ... was precipitated as it seemed into eternity; but the strong rope broke, and feel scatheless; then sitting under the scaffold with the patience and silence common to th.. who.. the bitterness of death is fact he acted the ..tates of a ..ssenger who had been despatched to the goodn.. to enquire what further was to be done by he. His Excellency Lord Seaforth the ... of the Island, replied in the words of th ... "that he was to be hanged by the neck until he was dead, dead, dead. The man remounted the scaffold and was hung; the rain came and I was born. Was it ... cal. No. for I have a very ha... judgement. My father's name was Samuel Reddish. He was half brother of Geo Canning who died Prime Minister of England; & who was both physically & mentally the most beautiful specimen of God's creation with whom I ever was permitted to become acquainted.
     My mother's name was Dorothy Ashby. She was the child and only surviving daughter of John Lewis Ashby the Dr of the same town. A was so beloved, so venerated, so trusted as might be incredible to relate in the present age. when man was , such used venerate not at all. My father at the time of this marriage as 25 years of age. in face for he was scarred with small pox but tall in figure and .. in di ... fearless .... accomplished of noble and generous ... but ... in ..... in action and speech, for alas in those day G had come within sanctifying and .... of religion. My blessed mother at the time of her marriage was but 17...
. A picture of Mary Reddish photographed in Sydney at the J Degotani studios at 348 George St, was inscribed on the back in her hand: My darling May with her grandmohter's' fond love ... ..29' Mrs Davies.
     Mary Reddish received a letter from Louis Fullerton Mackinnon dated 6 January 1878. The Whim, Old Harbour, Jamaica, January 6th 1878
     My dearly beloved cousin
     My very best wishes attend you on your natal day. I am writing at night but all our circle? visited? today at dinner in wishing you health and prosperity, and all sent you their love , i.e. my spouse, Mary and my two girls. In general Jane? & Willie come to us to spend Saturday and Sunday but they were not able to do so this week.
     I have been not a little disappointed at not hearing from you and dear Margaret during the past year, and I should have been in great anxiety but that the post mistress? of our village was found guilty of stealing three hundred letters for which wickedness she is now in prison. There was no letter of yours found amongst the lot discovered, but it is supposed that she must have destroyed some although she was so "left to herself" as the Scotch say, as to keep enough to prove her guilty. I hope that a letter of yours or Margaret's was amongst them else what has caused your silence. I was delighted at receiving a long and most interesting letter from dear Margaret in the middle of 1876. I replied to it on her birthday the 14th Sept 76. I then wrote to you on the 6th Jan 77 just a year ago, but I have not had the happiness of a line from any of you. If any evil had befallen you I think one of your daughters or good sons in law would have written to tell me. I am full of fear that dear Margaret has been ill again I hope not. I can only pray for you and yours and that I do daily and each milestone as I reach it reminds me how soon the time is approaching when we shall meet again to part no more. Thanks be unto God for his revealed? word and promises therein to all who .. looking to Christ for salvation. Last year I was much afflicted by the long illness of my dear girl Isabella but she has been quite well again since last August. She was ill a year and two months, a time of great anxiety and trouble to me.
     Most providentially a girl came out from England for a change of climate who had had exactly the same illness hysteria and she gave me the address of the medical man who had cured and who is famous for curing that most tormenting disorder. By Miss R's account she had been worse than

2. Isabel and she was perfectly cured. The prescription he sent (Jos ........ to consult him) was a course of ... and it was magical in its effects. She only took it eight months having been ill six months before we got his advice. I ... you this because medical men tell me that it is an illness which was unknown in their younger days - or very rare - and it is now a ... ... as well ... disease. I hope none your dear ones may ever be so tried. All the ... of my ... are flourishing I am thankful to say. Campbell and his family are still in Lima, and Ella had a third child, a fine boy on the 17th Nov. Mackinnon's birthday. The congregation at Lima have
b. Campbell to stay two weeks longer and promised him £50 a year more. I love children dearly and it is now small disappointment that they are so far beyond my read.
The passage from here to the colonies is only three days and the railway across Panama only four hours, from Panama a splendid steamer takes one to Callas in nine days and the railway from Callas to Lima is only 8 miles. This seems ... very difficult to get over to exchange visits and the expenses as Lima are beyond every thing I ever heard of . This little place of .... is quite full and the number of communicants doubled since he went there but as it is a .... bigoted Roman Catholic county the number of Protestants is very small.
We have a new Governor arrived but I have not yet been able to call on Lady Musgrave. I was not very well, and Mackinnon has had a rheumatic knee for some little time and it is not pleasant to go to strangers, as invalids. We sent Louis and Ellen with our cards and hope to go soon ourselves.
This last year was remarkable for a number of deaths from Yellow fever amongst families who reside in the highest mountains. The
I suppose you remember Mr John Ly... His brother 'Frank' is just dead leaving a widow and family very badly off. It grieves me to think of all the troubles you have had through your ... life but your dear bright grandchildren I can well imagine are a great joy and comfort to you. I hope dear Margaret ... not a ... to ... remember for a long time and that she is strong and well. A very large family must be a constant source of anxiety and great trial of strength to a mother who .... them all. My dear Spouse is well thanks be to God. He is ... me to have my photo taken and if it is done I will send you one. I feel and look old but I have yet lost a tooth I rejoice to say. Mary had a little of the fever prevalent but is on the whole well. I am very sure she would send you and yours her best love if she was with me. She often talks of her meeting with your young folks in England. How strange it is that people who love each other dearly are destined to pass the best part of their life in opposite parts of the world. Now when Campbell goes to Lima I shall feel as if he were in Australia, somehow England feels much nearer. We know it is the best place in the world in every sense. Parting with any one to go there seems quite a different think.




Colonial Secretary, Mr Rushworth, with whom we were intimate was one of the victims. His step son, who had come out from England on a few months visit was the first. He had three days illness only - then Mr R....th's daughter and lastly himself. It threw such gloom over society for a long time. Ellen & Willie bec... a very gay garden party at their house about a fortnight before the youth's death and Ellen said it was difficult to think of it as so soon t... into such a sense of woe.
A few weeks ago I met our old friends Mr Mortlock. I should not have known him again although Ellen had told me of the great change in his appearance. When she met him some time before I did... asking that if that was one of the beaux the other time they must have been a sorry set? Although

3. he married a very young girl who had money three or four years ago, he has a most dilapidated look. He reminded me of one of the pictures in the Old Curiosity Shop. He married a Miss Williams, a grand- daughter of Col. Willock. You doubtless remember him, and his son Frank and the girls. I heard last week that Ann Fray that was - Mrs Patterson has removed to Kingston, her daughter having married a merchant there. She was enquiring after us, but we have not met. Mrs Dewar sends her pretty daughter to visit friends in Kingston but we have not met.

I do not remember any one else that it would interest you to hear of. Mrs Land's eldest daughter waited until 38 and then married a rich well looking agreeable man - a Dr Hamilton. I ought to have said Mrs Stewart for Mrs Land married a second time and was most unhappy in her second marriage. She told me once when staying with us at Hal... Hall that unhappiness in married life was always the wife's fault. When I heard of the wretched life she led I often thought of her opinion on this point. Her first marriage was indeed a happy one poor thing...
One of her daughters married Lt Kitchener, but he has left the Army and gone to New Zealand to manage his uncle's property there.
Agnes resides in Kingston again, this place did not agree with her. She is still very delicate in health I am sorry to say. Her good unselfish daughter Janie? is a real treasure to her. I hope your good Anne is alive and well. Remember me to her if she is within your reach. We do hope to go to Milk River Bath next week for the benefit of my dear Spouse's lame knee. It is the place where we met first and we like to revisit it sometimes for the sake of Auld Lang Syne, but we have not been there since 1871. Now that Mackinnon in Manager of the Railway as well as attorney for it, which he only was for some years, we go into Kingston every week and stay some days at the Railway House. Louis resides there which makes it pleasant for us. Mary sends her best love to you and the girls. She often talks of meeting in London with you and your young people. I do so long to hear of you all again. In my heart I revile the post mistress at times, and at other moments I fear that Margaret is ill or George. Why I do not fancy you or Mala ill I cannot think but so it is. I hope that the Church which good Mr D. is ... had such a share in building is flourishing.


3. he married a very young girl she had money three or four years ago, he has amuch delapiidated look. - reminded me of one of the icu


Poor Jamaica was the last place in Christendom to have the church disestablished. The people are so bitterly indifferent to religion that I verily believe a great many would not be sorry to see the Churches shut up and the Dissenters would of course rejoice, not that their places of worship are a little fuller that they used to be. They will have a great deal to answer for I think in having succeeded in getting the church here disestablished. ... of numbers of clergymen have left because they & their families cannot live on the small sum given to them and of which little as it is they cannot be sure for more than a year at once.

I hope you will write me soon my dearest cousin. I pray daily that we may meet in heaven when our sojourn on earth is over. Mackinnon has just come in and he desires me to send to you and yours his love and best wishes. Isabell often talks of her little cousins whom she would like so much to see. The boy and Ellen unite in best love and ever believe me my dearest friend and cousin
Yours most affectionately
L Mackinnon



[Written across page 1]
What joy it must be to you that your son-in-law takes so deep an interest in such matters. - Lewis - Mackinnon and the girls join Mary and myself in best love and very best wishes to you and all your dear ones and I am ever my dearest coz your very affectionately attached friend and cousin,
L Mackinnon
.
     Mary died on 26 September 1881 in Nelson Place, Williamstown, Victoria, aged 78. Her family bible states: Died at E S & A bank Williamstown, Mary Davis, mother of the above on Sept 26 1881.
     Frontispiece of another bible held by John Hooper Mary Davies with Adele? Norcott's love April 26 80. To be sent to my dear son after my death, that he may learn to love it and prosper by its preachings ... his mothers greatest earthly wish and prayer - Aug 11th 1881. Our beloved mother died at ...... on Monday morning September 26th 1881. Blessed be the pure in heart for they shall see God .... She was buried on 28 September 1881 in Williamstown.
     Her will was proved on 25 November 1881 at Victoria. Her estate was valued at £190. She held a mortgaged house and 2 parcels of land in Clarke St, Williamstown.

Children of Mary Reddish and Rev Thomas Davies

Mary Reddish

(December 1777 - 1823)
     Mary Reddish was born in December 1777 in Dublin. She was born during a second spell in Dublin at the end of 1777. She used the name Hunn in her later life. Although no record survives for a baptism in Dublin, Maria Reddish and Jeanne Costello were sponsors for Ambrosius, son of Patriciii Costello & Annae Barret. The priest was Ricarco Sheridan and the date 12 Jan 1778 at St Nicholas RC.
In 2010 Julian Crowe wrote, quoting from Mary Qnn's letters: "in December 1777 Mary was born — and surely she was a blessing sent by gracious Heaven to soften and to soothe a Multitude of Sorrows!— and when I think of her pious duties, her affectionate childhood, and her respectable Character at this moment as wife & Mother — yet persevering in every filial regard to a Mother, whom She cannot fail to see dishonor’d by the darling Child who was always avowedly preferred to her — surely I cannot help seeing the mixture of good and Evil in this most fatal Event of my Eventfull life".. She was the daughter of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello.
     She was to become an apprentice teacher under Mrs moore for a premium of £100 provided by her half brother George but it took some time arrive..
     Mary Reddish married Richard Thompson on 19 November 1801 in St Andrew, Plymouth, Devon. Richard Thompson of New Inn, London Esqr, a bachelor & Mary Redish usually known by the name of Mary Hunn of this parish, spinster married in this church by licence 19 Nov 1801. Both signed in the presence of Mary Anne Hunn. Maria? Hunn, Emily Mayne & James Gatkins.
     Mary Reddish and Richard Thompson lived at Kennington Common, Surrey.
     Mary died in 1823 in 35 Henrietta Street, Bath, Somerset. Her half brother Geo Canning "was very fond of her" & he secured Thompson her husband a job at H.M. Customs House, Thames Street. She died at her mother's home in Henrietta St, Bath leaving 5 children. her 2 sons were also recommended by Geo Canning for the Indian Civil Service..

Children of Mary Reddish and Richard Thompson

Mary Anne Reddish

(1810 - )
     Mary Anne Reddish was born in 1810 in India. Julian Crowe wrote: When Charles Reddish died leaving an orphan daughter George arranged for her
upkeep and set up a fund to provide a dowry – on condition that she stayed in India.
. She was the daughter of Charles Reddish and Caroline Beatrice Manning.
     Mary Anne Reddish married J B Richards on 15 June 1841 in Calcutta, West Bengal, India. She married a wealthy indigo planter: At Calcutta, on the 15th of June, at the principal Roman Catholic church, by the Right Rev. Dr. Carew, J B Richards, Esq, of Culna, to Miss Mary Anne Reddish, only daughter of the late Captain & Mrs Charles Reddish.

Samuel Reddish

(1735 - 31 December 1785)
     The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography states: Reddish, Samuel (1735-1785), actor and theatre manager, was born in Frome, Somerset, the son of a tradesman. He was educated at Frome grammar school and apprenticed, at the age of fifteen, to a surgeon in Plymouth. For facts about his early life we have generally to rely on his own account, rewritten and glossed as ‘Memoirs of Mr Reddish’ in the Covent Garden Magazine of 1773. It recounts that he ran away to join a Norwich company, playing small roles for a salary of 15s. per week. After two years he was employed by Henry Woodward for the Crow Street Theatre, Dublin, and appeared as Lord Townley in Sir John Vanbrugh's The Provoked Husband, a part he made his own, in October 1759. He took the part of Pierre in Thomas Otway's Venice Preserv'd at Edinburgh the following year. By November 1761 he was at the Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin. For the next five years he circulated between Norwich, Cork, and the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, where he played Captain Macheath in John Gay's The Beggar's Opera in July 1764. The following season he returned to Smock Alley with a Mrs Reddish, possibly Polly Hart (d. 1799), an actress who had played briefly at Drury Lane. The Covent Garden account drily notes that Polly had ‘an annuity of 200 l. settled on her for former services, which gave every spur to his assiduity’. Undoubtedly Reddish's financial affairs were in a state of some disarray by 1766. The Covent Garden Magazine enjoys the story of his bid to stave off his Irish creditors with promises of income from his benefit night. He even persuaded some to purchase tickets for his Richard III, but their tickets were refused at the door, and by the morning Reddish was on his way to England with the receipts.
Samuel and Polly next appear at the Orchard Theatre, Bath, for the 1766–7 season and at the new theatre in Bristol. Reddish was to take on the running of the Bristol theatre in 1770 with Clarke, Dodd, and William Parsons, and he managed it single-handedly from 1774 to 1776. However, Bristol was not the focus of his performance activity. He had finally won himself a place in Garrick's Drury Lane company, and he made his début, as Lord Townley, on 18 September 1767. Hopkins, the prompter, thought him ‘but an indifferent figure—will be useful’. Indeed, Reddish was useful that season tackling a series of young sentimental heroes and noblemen, including Lord Falbridge in George Colman's The English Merchant, Posthumus in Cymbeline, George Barnwell in George Lillo's The London Merchant, Moneses in Nicholas Rowe's Tamerlane, Fainall in William Congreve's The Way of the World, Macduff to Garrick's Macbeth, and Edgar in King Lear. He was offered the title role in Nathaniel Lee's Theodosius, and he originated the role of Frederick Melmoth in William Kenrick's The Widowed Wife and Lord Winworth in Hugh Kelly's False Delicacy. Throughout his career at Drury Lane, Reddish was entrusted with leading roles in new comedies, such as Frampton in Elizabeth Griffith's The School for Rakes, Belville in Kelly's The School for Wives, and Sir John Dormer in his A Word to the Wise, as well as in roles in Alexander Dow's tragedies: Zemouca in Zingis and Menes in Sethona. He even turned his hand to producing, and adapted a musical spectacle, The Heroine of the Cave, with Henry Jones and Paul Hiffernan. In all, Reddish played winter seasons at Drury Lane for ten years, where his weekly earnings increased year on year from £8 in the 1773 season to £12 per week during his final season, 1776–7, under Sheridan. Reddish also had income from his summers as actor–manager at Bristol.
Polly Hart Reddish performed at Drury Lane during the 1771–2 season, but by the end of that year she had been replaced as Mrs Reddish by Mary Ann Canning (c.1747–1827), although the couple did not marry. Mary Ann's aspirations to act were unhindered by talent. Undeterred by regular hissings, Samuel championed her and insisted on lead roles for her at Bristol. She was the unhappy butt of Hannah More's quip in a letter to Garrick on 28 July 1777: ‘This is the second or third wife he has produced at Bristol: in a short time we have had a whole bunch of Reddishes, and all remarkably unpungent’ (Highfill, Burnim & Langhans, BDA).

Critical response to Reddish himself was equivocal. The Dramatic Censor (1770) thought that as Macduff he demonstrated ‘superior strength and beauty: his feelings are manly, yet tender; spirited without excess’ (Gentleman, 1.111). However, his playing of more passionate characters was hampered by his weak voice. The same critic thought him ‘deficient in powers for the most impassioned speeches’ of Alonzo in Aphra Behn's The Revenge, and with ‘nothing of the requisite volubility’ required to play Young Belmont in Moore's The Foundling (Gentleman, 2.332, 220). An even-handed assessment of his ability perhaps comes in Frederick Pilon's The Drama: a Poem (1775):
Reddish wants pow'r, th'emotions strong to raise,
But his attention gains, and merits praise;
Tho' voice and feeling small assistance lend,
He oft has pleas'd, and seldom does offend.
By 1774 Reddish was beginning to show signs of the mental disorder which was to dog the rest of his life. In April 1775 Hopkins noted that: ‘Matilda was advertis'd for this Night, but Mr Reddish came Yesterday as Mad as a March Hare … & behav'd like a Man in Despair’ (Highfill, Burnim & Langhans, BDA). During the summer at Bristol, William Parsons wrote to Garrick that Reddish had been unable to perform at all: ‘His countenance undergoes the most sudden alterations. His memory fails him’ (ibid.) These temporary lapses of memory and alterations became apparent to audiences by November 1776, and he was booed off as Vainlove in Congreve's The Old Batchelor. Sheridan did not renew his contract to play at Drury Lane the following year, and 1777 was also his last season at Bristol.

After a disastrous benefit night, he sold his share and played a final season at the Crow Street Theatre, Dublin. He appeared twice more in London, as Hamlet in a one-off performance at Covent Garden in October 1778, and then when he elected to reprise Posthumus in a benefit at Covent Garden on 5 May 1779. John Ireland recounts that Reddish arrived at the theatre under the impression he was to play Romeo. ‘The instant he came in sight of the audience his recollection seemed to return … it was only the stage that had the power to unsettle this delusion’ (Highfill, Burnim & Langhans, BDA).

Reddish's delicate financial affairs were in ruins by the end of his life, and he applied for assistance to the Drury Lane Actors' Fund in 1778 for the support of his three surviving children by Mary Ann Canning. He disappeared from view over the next few years, but he was confined at some point to York Asylum, where he died on 13 December 1785.
J. Milling
Sources
Highfill, Burnim & Langhans, BDA · ‘Memoirs of Mr Reddish’, Covent Garden Magazine (1773) · F. Gentleman, The dramatic censor, or, Critical companion, 2 vols. (1770) · F. Pilon, The drama: a poem (1775) · J. Boaden, Memoirs of the life of John Philip Kemble, 2 vols. (1825)
Likenesses
V. Green, engraving, 1771 (after R. E. Pine) · G. Grignion, engraving, 1775 (after T. Parkinson), repro. in J. Bell, ed., Bell's edition of Shakespeare's plays, 9 vols. (1773–4) · J. M. Delatre, engraving, 1776 (after J. J. Barralet), repro. in The New English theatre, 12 vols. (1776–7) · J. Thornthwaite, engraving, 1776 (after J. Roberts), repro. in J. Bell, Bell's British theatre · T. Parkinson, oils, 1778?, Garr. Club · J. J. Barralet, pen-and-ink drawing, Folger · T. Parkinson, ink and watercolour drawing, BM · T. Parkinson, watercolour, BM · J. Roberts, watercolour, BM · theatrical prints, BM, NPG
Wealth at death
nil (supported by Drury Lane Actors' Fund): Folger, 1778 entry, James Winston's transcriptions; Highfill, Burnim & Langhans, BDA
© Oxford University Press 2004–5
J. Milling, ‘Reddish, Samuel (1735-1785)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/23244, accessed 24 Sept 2005]
Samuel Reddish (1735-1785): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/23244
. Samuel Reddish was born in 1735 in Frome, Sussex? or Somerset. According to his own account published in "Miller's London Mercury no. X and "Memoirs of Mr Reddish" published in the "Covent Garden Magazine" in 1773, he was born in "Froome", the son of a tradesman and was apprentice to a surgeon at Plymouth at the age of 15, after attending the Frome Grammar School, His mother and his half siblings settled in the Frome, Rode, Bath area of Somerset.
However Farington states on p. 26: Samuel Reddish (1735- 1785), son of a tradesman of Frome, was educated at Frome Grammar School, and while an apprentice to a surgeon he joined the Norwich Company of Players at fifteen shillings a week, after having applied unsuccessfully for an engagement at the Plymouth Theatre. He was not a great actor, nor, according to the author of Theatrical Biography, 1772, was he a particularly honourable man. His acting was characterized by great violence ; indeed he, as Castalio stabbed William Smith, who impersonated Polydore. Reddish, who died in York Lunatic Asylum, was married to Miss Hart, a stage beauty of her day, immortalized by Churchill, and it seems he did actually marry George Canning's mother as his second wife.
Also p. 148: Mrs. Canning, mother of the Right Honble. George Canning, appeared upon the London Stage abt. 30 years ago. Her Mother was Midwife to the Queen. She lived with Reddish, the Player, & was sd. to be married to Him. After His death she appeared at Plymouth with a company of Strolling Players, & there she married a man of the name of H--- Son of a person who had a small office under government.
Mrs. Canning was married to Redditch, an actor, afterwards to Hunn, a Plymouth linen-draper. She outlived him for many years.. Samuel was an actor/manager from 1759. The Biographical dictionary of Actors calls him an actor, singer, manager and quotes that he fled his surgeon master and joined the Norwich company of players at a salary of 15 shillings per week. At Norwich his roles were insignificant. Resenting his lowly status, he left that company after about two years and found a place in the company at Richmond Surrey, for one summer. Emboldened by some success there, he applied to Rich at Covent Garden and then to Garrick at Drury Lane but was spurned by both. At that time, Henry Woodward was in London, recruiting for the Crow Street Theatre in Dublin, and offered Reddish an engagement.
That last statement is borne out by other records. Faulkner's Dublin journal for 9 October 1759 heralded the Irish debut on 12 October at the Crow Street Theatre of "A Young gentleman" in the role of Lord Townley in The Provok'd husband; the same publication identified him as Reddish on 27 November. He was on the playbill of the Cecilia Hall in Edinburgh on 12 March 1760 as Pierre in Venice preserv'd. He returned to Dublin on 12 November 1761, for a debut at Smock Alley Theatre, playing Etan in The Orphan of China (again as "A Young gentleman"; he was identified in the newspapers on 8 December).
A checklist of the Norwich Theatre's roster for 1761, furnished us by Alick Williams, yields Reddish's name. W S Clark found it on the bills of the Cork Theatre on 24 September and 15 October 1762 and 12 September 1763. Reddish was again at Crow Street in 1763-4, according to company lists made by W J Lawrence and now in the University of Cincinatti Library. In July 1764 Reddish played Captain Macheath in The Beggar's opera and Lord Townley in the The Provok'd husband at the Theatre Royal, Shakespeare Square, Edinburgh.
When he returned to Smock Alley in 1765-66, Reddish was accompanied by a Mrs Reddish, who also acted there that season. Her identity cannot now be certainly determined; Reddish acquired and abandoned several consorts. But she was probably Polly Hart, who had acted for a few nights as Miss Hart at Drury lane in the 1760-61 season; for when Reddish turned up at the Orchard Street Theatre in Bath in 1766-67 he was accompanied by "Mrs Polly Reddish," according to Arnold Hare in Theatre Royal, Bath.
The chronology of Reddish's life in the Convent Garden magazine is, therefore, somewhat awry, for that account states Soon after his arrival in London he paid his addresses to Miss H---t of Drury-lane theatre ..., this lady had an annuity of £200, settled on her for [it: former services, which give every spur to his assiduity, and which terminated, after a short acquaintance, In an honourable surrender." Whatever it was that gulled the hapless Miss Hart, Reddish's prodigality had evidently made him desperate. For the same narrative asserts that his Irish creditors had become so clamourous that he called them together and persuaded them to accept tickets to his benefit in partial payment of his debts, the remainder to be "paid in cash from the receipts... the morning after his benefit by the treasurer..." The creditors agreed, tickets were delivered, elaborate puffs were placed in the newspapers, and Richard III was advertised 'in every corner of the metropolis, in bills not an inch less than eight feet long." But of course, the tickets were not accepted at the door, and the promised receipts were not distributed to the creditors next morning. The money had disappeared, along with Sam Reddish, who was by then on his way to England. The experience did not chasten him. Evidently one of his extravagances was horse racing, and he persisted in it. A clipping dated 1 November 1769, in the Burney collection in the British Library states that "on Wednesday a match was run over Epsom course by two colts belonging to Mr Vernon and Mr Reddish, both of Drury Lane Theatre, which was won with ease by the former."
In the same season - 1766-67 - that the had appeared at Bath, Reddish had begun an association with the new theatre in Bristol. First he only acted; then in 1770 he became part proprietor with Clarke, Dodd, and Parsons. From 1774 through 1775 he was the sole manager. But his principal activity was to be in London.
Reddish made his Drury lane debut on 18 September 1767, as Lord Townley, and was well received. The prompter Hopkins noted that, though he had "but an indifferent figure, - [he] will be useful." Polly, his wife, was also engaged by Garrick and played at Drury Lane through he 1771-72 season, when she disappeared from the London bills, having been succeeded in her husband's affections by Mary Anne Canning, whose ambitions it now became Reddish's concern to advance.
     Mrs Canning played at Drury Lane from November 1773 through May 1774. She evidently had a bad voice and little acting ability, and her engagement was not renewed. In the summers of 1774 and 1775 Reddish exercised his power as manager at Bristol to push her on in principal roles, now billing her as "Mrs Reddish." He wheedled Garrick into allowing her to fill in for the recalcitrant Mrs Yates as Andromache in The Distrest mother in March 1775, producing the critical comment in Hopkins' diary, "Such a performance I think was never seen in Drury Lane Theatre very bad indeed many hisses." In her first appearance in the summer of 1776 at Bristol, when Reddish cast her as Elizabeth in Richard III, she was hissed off. Yet, stubbornly, Reddish persisted. When Sheridan took over from Garrick at Drury Lane in 1776 he was persuaded to give Mary Ann another try, in the role of Azema in Semiramis. She was so very inadequate, reported Hopkins, that "she was hissed all through, and must never perform again." She never did, in London.
Samuel Reddish continued to play at Drury Lane for a few winter seasons, 1767-68 through 1776-77, before returning to Dublin in 1777-78. His roles were numerous and of a fairly wide range - from Iago in Othello to Alexander in The Rival Queens. But he was principally successful in young, sentimental heroes, beaus, and noblemen - Romeo in Romeo & Juliet, Raymond in The Countess of Salisbury, Lord Aimworth in The Maid of the Mill, Lothario in The Fair penitent, Richmond in Richard III, Jaffeir in Venice preserv'd, Falkland in The Rivals, Young Fashion in A Trip to Scarborough, and the like. He "originated" a number of roles: Fred Melmoth in William Kenrick's comedy The Widow'd wife, Zemouca in Alexander Dow's tragedy Zingis, Frampton in Elizabeth Griffith's comedy The School for Rakes...
Reddish was valuable as an actor - his roles show that, as well as his salary. (He was well paid: in 1773, £8 for a week; in 1775, £10; in 1776-77 £11, and in 1777-78 £12.) But it is difficult to assess his abilities fairly. His erratic conduct in the theatre and his poor treatment of his women probably skewed some contemporary judgements. he was a quick study, always willing - at least at first - to assume a role if a fellow actor was ill; and he was persuasive speaker of prologues and a passable singer.
But most critics seemed grudging in their assessments. The Theatrical review came down heavily on him when The Orphan was presented in October 1771: "Mr Reddish's Abilities are by no means suited to the Character of Castolio, waning every necessary requisit to support the Poet's Intention... His Love wants delicate Sensibility; His Grief, Tenderness and heartfelt Distress; and Rage forcibillity [sic] of Importance and Power."
In November 1771, Barry being ill, Reddish stepped in as Bajazet in Tamerlane. His performance was judged "not the thing" by the prompter, Hopkins, a comment he levelled that same month at Reddish's Belcour in The West Indian. The Theatrical review in April 1772 found his Macbeth "a character not suited to Mr Reddish's powers and feelings..." Thomas Davies, in Memoirs of the life of David Garrick, Esq. (1780), remembered that Reddish had given commendable performances in such roles as the Duke of Braganza, without being either elegant or striking in figure or very handsome, because he spoke with "taste." Davies found that his great fault was a habitual smile, which was there through joy, grief, love, or jealousy. ...
Reddish it seems, was guilty of shameless self-promotion. "... it was proved that the late Mr Reddish had paid in one season upwards of thirty pounds to Paragraph writer’s for occasional praises on his acting - ."
In his later years at Drury Lane, Reddish's personality, perhaps never very attractive, began to disintegrate. He was a party to a cabal that hissed the aging Charles Macklin, leading to a riot; he incurred Garrick's wrath by asserting that he, Reddish, was too important to walk in theatrical processions; he forgot which nights he was to play. By 1774, his eccentricity began to give way to spells of insanity. Hopkins noted in his prompter's diary of 6 March 1775, "Mr Reddish being a little out of his senses he could not Play." and a substitution had to be made. On 1 April following, Hopkins wrote: "Matilda was advertis'd for this night, but Mr Reddish came Yesterday as Mad as a March Hare, Said he had all the Terrors of the Damn'd upon him, & that he had not had a Wink of Sleep all Night. Call'd the Great Gods & the dear Woman (Mrs Canning) that lay by his side to Witness the Truth of this Assertion & behav'd like a Man in Despair."
On 6 April, Hopkins noted "Mr Reddish still continuing a little Mad or So - Mr Cautherly plaid the Duke" in Braganza. In June 1775 William Parson wrote to Garrick from Bristol that Reddish was followed everywhere by his debtors. He had fallen down "and continued long in a fit eight days ago, and has not been able to perform since his arrival here. His countenance undergoes the most sudden alterations. His memory fails him." Yet a letter from Reddish to Garrick (now in the Garrick Club) from Bristol on 20 September following found Reddish hopeful. He boasted of his summer success, sent Garrick £50 to apply to an old debt, and asserted that "my health, thank God [is] quite restor'd, and my mind at present happy and at peace, & should both continue undisturb'd, I hope to compensate this season, for the disappointments of the last."
Thus it went, with Reddish rational and acting his usual line of parts most of the time, but with more frequent apses into vagueness and spells of complete vacuity. ... Reddish final summer at Bristol was pitiful. Garrick receiving a running commentary of it from Hannah More. Reddish gave offense to the audience by insisting on casting Mrs Canning in principal parts (and as "Mrs Reddish'). He was greatly hissed as Richard III. There were poor houses. An actor named Robinson challenged Reddish to a duel because of some breach of articles. Reddish, alarmed produced a flash of wit, requesting postponement of the duel until after 132 August, his benefit date, because he was so in debt he could not afford to die. When his benefit night arrived , he had a huge house - but the audience had come to abuse him. They pelted him for a quarter of an hour before he was allowed to speak. Reddish sold his share and left Bristol's creditors and critics forever. In 1777-78 he found employment at the Crow Street Theatre in Dublin.
Reddish never acted at Drury Lane after the season of 1776-77. On 12 October 1778 he made his first appearance at Covent Garden, playing Hamlet, but he was not engaged for the season. He went on to Edinburgh and Dublin. On 5 May 1779 he was offered a compassionate benefit performance by the Covent Garden management. Tickets could be had of him at his lodgings, "No.14, near the Turnpike, Tottenham Court Road." James Boaden, in his Memoirs of the life of John Philip Kemble, preserved John Ireland's account of the occasion. Reddish "was now infirm; in common occurrences imbecile, but it was resolved to try whether he could not go through the character of Posthumus." [Ireland] met his friend an hour before the performance began. Reddish entered the room with the step of an idiot, his eye wandering, and his whole countenance vacant. ..." That was his last performance.
Reddish had already, in 1778, applied for assistance to the Drury Lane actors' fund, according to james Winston's transcriptions in the Folger Library. The Fund supplied him for a while and made some provision for his children.
Polly Hart and Mary Anne Costello Canning seem to have been only the last two of a succession of women whom Reddish introduced to the provincial stage as "Mrs Reddish". (Hannah More had written to Garrick on 28 July 1777 about Mrs Canning: "This is the second or third wife has produced at Bristol: in a short time we have had a whole bundle of Reddishes, and all remarkably unpungent.") Mrs Canning had borne Reddish five children - twins who died young, a son Samuel, a son Charles, and Charles' twin, a girl who grew up to act at least once. Mrs Canning had also brought Reddish two children by her former husband George Canning, a daughter and the boy George Canning who later became Prime Minister of England.
12 portraits of Samuel Reddish are listed.
     Doran comments: The Players of the Garrick period ... Of these, Samuel Reddish was a player of that great epoch, who, for some especial parts, stood in the foremost rank. We first hear of him in the season of 1761-2, strengthening Mossop's company in Smock Alley Dublin, by his performance of Etan, in the "Orphan of China". Of his origin, no one knows more than what he published of himself in the Irish papers, - that he was "a gentleman of easy fortune". This description was turned against him by his old enemy Macklin, on one occasion, when Reddish, in a part he was acting, threw away an elegantly bound book, which he was supposed to have been reading. Macklin's comment was that, however unnatural in the character he was representing, it was quite consistent in Mr Reddish himself, who "you know, has advertised himself as a gentleman of easy fortune". In September 1767, Reddish first appeared in London, at Drury Lane, as Lord Townly, to Mrs Abington's "My Lady". A few nights after, he played Posthumus to the Imogen of Mrs Baddeley. It was in this last character that he took his melancholy leave of the stage at Covent Garden, shaken in mind and memory, - on the 3rd of May 1779; Mrs Bulkley was then the Imogen. His career in London was but of twelve years, and it might have been longer and more brilliant but for that "fast" life which consumed him, - and for one illustration of which, when he was rendered incapable of acting, he made humble apology on the succeeding evening. Within those dozen years Sam Reddish played an infinite variety of characters, from tragedy to farce. Among those he originated were Darnley ("Hypocrite"), Young fashion ("Trip to Scarborough"), and Philotas ("Grecian daughter"). As an actor his voice and figure were highly esteemed in Dublin, but the latter was not considered striking in London. ... When Churchill said, "With transient gleam of grace Hart sweeps along" he was praising the lady whom Reddish married soon after he came to London, and who lost the "transient gleam" in ungracefully growing fat. ... As early as the year 1773, Reddish exhibited one symptom of the malady which compelled him, ultimately to retire, namely the want of memory, which indicates weakness of the brain... During the season of 1777-8, he was incapable of acting, and was supported by the fund. In the following season, he essayed Hamlet, but it was almost as painful as the Ophelia of poor mad Susan Mountfort. Later in the season, in May 1779, the managers gave him a benefit, when "Cymbeline" was acted, and Reddish was announced for Posthumus. An hour or two before the play began, he called at a friend's house, vacant, restless and wandering... He soon became diseased again, and, shut up in a mad-house, poor Reddish might be seen on visitor's days at St Luke's, a sad and humiliating spectacle, herding among the lunatics in that once popular place of cruel exhibition. Two old feelings survived the otherwise complete wreck - his love of good living and his dislike of inferior company. He drank greedily from his draught of milk, out of a wooden bowl, but the "gentleman of easy fortune" complained bitterly of his forced association with the low people who thronged the gallery. He was moved to better air, improved diet, and less plebeian society - in the Asylum at York.
Tragic actor-manager. Married Miss Hart "who enjoyed an income derived from a degrading source". After spending her money he left her. Had an unhappy affair with Mary Ann Costello, treating her very badly. In September 1775 Reddish failed to repay Garrick as he was buying a share in the Bristol theatre. He appeared for the last time in "Posthumous" & was thrown upon the Fund for support. He embezzled the funds of a Theatrical Society of which he was treasurer - sent to York jail. In the 1770s debt, drunkenness & madness finally closed his career. He was sent to York Asylum.
Reddish was principal tragedian to Mrs George Ann Bellamy's Glasgow season.
See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography for further information: www.oxforddnb.com/. See also: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Reddish,_Samuel_(DNB00).
     In 1765, Samuel Reddish, gentleman subscribed to 2 copies of The Antique description and account of the city of Exeter....
     Reddish was accompanied by Mrs Polly Reddish according to Arnold Hare in Theatre Royal, Bath.
     Samuel Reddish had a long term relationship with Grace (Polly) Hart from 1767. When Reddish made his debut at Drury Lane, there was a Miss Hart in the theatre, who enjoyed an income derived from a degrading source, and Reddish, tempted by her money, and utterly indifferent as to how it was acquired, wooed and married her in less than ten weeks. Afterwards, prevailling upon her to sell her annuity, he dissipated the proceeds and then abandoned her.
     In the 1766-67 season he began an association with a new theatre in Bristol. First he only acted, then in 1770 he became part proprietor with Clarke, Dodd and Parson. From 1774 through 1776 he was the sole manager.
     Samuel Reddish had a long term relationship with Mary Ann Costello, daughter of Jordan Costello and Mary Guy Dickens, from circa 1774.
     On 30 Jun 1777 Saunder's newsletter carried an article stating: Mr Reddish returns his sincere thanks to the public of Dublin for the very warm .... sorry his engagement to perform with Mr Heaphy at Cork renders it impractical for him to appear here after Thursday next the 3rd July... Another page advertised a performance on July 3 of the comedy of 'The West India' by Mr 7 Mrs Reddish..
     Mr Reddish's night. On Tuesday, March 10th, will be presented the Historical Marque of Alfred the Great, the Father of his People. Never yet performed in this city. Alfred by Mr Reddish (who performed it during the run, at the Theatre Royal, in Drury-lane) ... the part of the Quee Eltruda by Mrs reddish (being her first appearance this season) .... Samuel Reddish was admitted to Bethlem, London, on 10 February 1781 Saml Reddish of St George, Bloomsbury, Middlesex. He was admitted to Bootham Hospital, York, on 17 May 1783 Mr Reddish, a comedian whose address and surety was given as The Company of Comedians in Drury Lane, London (amended as an error to Covent Garden). He was admitted suffering loss of memory and died in the asylum 2 1/2 years later.
     Samuel died on 31 December 1785 in York Asylum, York. He was buried on 1 January 1786 in St Olave, York.
     The Times reported: Drury Lane Theatrical Fund: Yesterday, at the City of London Tavern, a dinner was given to the friends and supporters of this institution... The Master Mr Kean .... thought it rather an extraordinary circumstance... some members of his own profession not subscribed to this institution... One of the most affecting and encouraging examples was the case of that once well-known favourite of the public, Mr Reddish, who in the delineation of the mimic madness of Edgar was second only to the inimitable Garrick. This gentleman had been a subscriber to this Institution, and thus had given to himself and his family that protection which could not otherwise be obtained. From this fund was the son now supported, and had been educated, and introduced into a most respectable rank in life. [Note that a Mr Canning gave £5 to the fund].
     Extracts of the reminiscenses of the late Mr Taylor were published in the Morning chronicle, London, 22 Oct 1832 and state that at p. 45, we learn that Reddish the actor, went mad, because Whitfield struck off his bag-wig when playing Hamlet, and exposed his bald pate to the laughter of the audience. This Reddish 'was the second husband of Mrs Canning, the mother of our late eminent statesman'.

Children of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello

Samuel Reddish

(8 April 1775 - 13 August 1812)
     Samuel Reddish was christened on 8 April 1775 in St Giles in the Fileds, Holborn, Middlesex. Samuel Reddish, son of Samuel & Mary. He was the son of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello.
     In an article about the Drury Lane Theatrical Fund celebrations dated 25 March 1830 it was stated: An interesting subject-viz; "A provision for the Orphan Children of Decayed Actors: - was discussed; and Mr Thompson with the view of illustrating what great advantages had accrued from the exertions of the Drury-Lane Fund, in the year 1789, and who had searched and collated the Records handed down form the highly gifted founder of the Society, David Garrick, read an ancient Letter, "dated September 1789," which he had selected from many others, which proved that the son of an actress of Drury-Lane Theatre had, by his talents, become Prime Minister of England (Canning); and the next brother Samuel Reddish, an orphan was reared, well read, indifferently clothed, but certainly classically educated, by the Drury-Lane Benevolent Fund! Young Samuel (as appears from after correspondence) became an accomplished scholar and gentleman; but his talents (backed by the interest of Sheridan and his brother George) no sooner raised him to a high civil situation abroad, than he died!
We give a copy verbatim of the boy's whimsical letter, as a proof of an ardent mind, whose young ambition was properly directed: -
"To the directors of the Drury- Lane Theatrical Fund, "Scorton, September 20, 1789.
"Gentlemen - Having now attained an age when I must shortly expect your kind guardianship to cease, permit the feeling heart of a grateful but inexperienced boy to thank you for your more than paternal kindness. The sound and liberal education which your bounty has bestowed on me will, I hope, enable me to struggle courageously with the great world into which I am so shortly to be thrown: and in whatever situation chance may place me, I shall acquit myself with that unsullied reputation which it will be the anxiety and ambition of my life to attain and preserve. I now venture on a last intrusion on your liberality; I learn, from my reading, that in the world, a light accomplishment frequently prove a recommendation, when sound erudition passes unnoticed. In your attention to my head, my dear and kind guardians, my heels have been totally neglected! I have never learned to dance, though I am graced as the best classic scholar at Scorton. I am very graceless at entering a room; if you will allow my last six months tuition to include dancing, your now grateful boy may, perhaps, when a man, be spar'd many a blush for his heels, in that society where his head may chance to place him! I hope you will pardon the vanity of an ambitious boy, and grant his request - and if would add to that kindness, by allowing a new pair of leather breeches for present use - five and nine pence arrears for cricket bats and fruit, and only three months Italian - I think I shall then be 'arm'd at all points" and ready to encounter those worldly difficulties which to the buoyancy of youth are always light".
The following was the laconic answer from the Fund Committee:
"Cricket bats, Italian literature and new leather breeches - allow'd
"Dancing - Oppos'd! - as unnecessary to a Classical Scholar; but it will be taken into consideration next month."
The reading of the Epistle and its eccentric answer excited much admiration and laughter; and after the transaction of some routine business, the Committee adjourned
.
     Samuel served in the New South Wales Corps as a Sergeant from 1794 to 1797 in Australia. Army records show: Muster roll of detachment: Received from Capt Mason's Company 10th Aug (1793?) Saml Reddish appointed Sergeant 10th Aug. The June-Dec 1794 Muster rolls show: Intermediate list - Samuel Reddish embarked 10 September. Appointed Corporal 30 Oct 1794, Sergeant 8th Dec 1794. He disappears from army records between Dec 24 1796 & June 1797. There is no muster roll for 1797.
     Samuel Reddish travelled to New South Wales, on 25 October 1794 per the "Surprize". He embarked for NSW 13th Feb 1794 on the "Surprize" (refer HO11/1 reels 87-88). Index to Home Office records at PRO - lists of transports sailing from London 1787-1836. The "Surprize" was on her second voyage to Australia, she carried 23 men & 60 women when she left England on 2 May 1794. Arrived 25 Oct 1794, 400 ton ship, master Patrick Campbell, surgeon James Thomson. She touched only at Rio, making the passage in 176 days and landed her prisoners without loss. Her convicts included 4 of the Scottish martyrs.
     The transport "Surprize" arrived from England carrying John Boston (with wife & 3 children), Matthew Pearce (& wife) and a young man named Ellis who who were free migrants, also William Baker, formerly a sergeant in the Marine Corps came as superintendent of convicts. By this ship Grose received several letters describing the cargo and the passengers. A letter from Dundas of Feb 15 formally notified him of Capt Hunter's appointment as Governor. Collins was incensed by the type of people sent out by Government. "A guard of an ensign and 21 privates of the NSW Corps were on board the transport. Six of these people were deserters from other regiments brought from the Savoy ...
     Samuel Reddish was granted land on 19 November 1794 in Lane Cove, New South Wales, Australia. He was granted 25 acres at Lane Cove, Hunters Hill by Francis Grose on 19 Nov 1794 for an annual quit rent of one shilling payable from 19 Nov 1799.
     Samuel Reddish lived at Norfolk Island, from 1 July 1795. On 1 July 1795 he arrived at the Norfolk Island Garrison, and was victualled for 182 days. He is mentioned in the Philip Gidley King papers as having supplied 290 lbs of salt beef in 1795-1796. Oct 3 1795 State of the settlement Norfolk Island - 2 sergeants.
     He is listed as arriving at Norfolk Island on the "Fancy" in the 1792-95 muster rolls indexed in theTasmanian colonial index.
     Samuel Reddish received a letter dated 30 January 1800. We hold a letter cover addressed to Samuel Reddish Esq. Post Office, Portsmouth, from London January thirtieth 1800, Geo Canning (freepost).. He received a prayer book from Mary Ann Costello on 12 February 1800 in Portsmouth, Hampshire. This was in the possession of John Ashby Hooper and is signed "the last gift of an affectionate mother, to S Reddish, may he be virtuous and happy, M A Hunn, Portsmouth 12 Feb 1800" presumably given on his departure for Barbados to be Comptroller of Customs at Bridgetown.
     Samuel Reddish arrived in February 1800 at West Indies. Samuel was Comptroller of Customs in Falmouth, Trelawney parish, Jamaica, from 1800. At his marriage on 31 Aug 1800 aged 25, he was Comptroller of Customs, Bridgetown, Barbados then became Collector of H M Customs at Falmouth, Jamaica.
     Samuel Reddish married Dorothy Ashby, daughter of John Lewis Ashby and Margaret Rebecca Vodry, on 31 August 1800 in St Michael, Bridgetown, Barbados. Married August 31 1800 Dorothy Ashby, daughter of John Lewis Ashby and Margaret Rebecca his wife to Samuel Reddish Esq. Comptroller of His Majesties Customs, Bridge Town, Barbados.
     Samuel was in London for part of 1803 and offered to take his half-brother Frederick under his wing in the West Indies..
     He produced a book "A digest of the laws of the Customs, as they relate to the plantations, carefully compiled from the statutes at large, 1805" No copy survives. Canning descrbed him as "bold, wild fellow".
     On the 5th February, a meeting took place near Kingston, in Jamaica, between the Hon H J Hinchecliffe, Judge of the Court of Vice Admiralty there, and Samuel Reddish, Esq.
Collector of the Customs at Falmouth and Montego Bay, and brother in law to Mr Canning ; who was appointed, to the situation when Mr C. was in power. The parties having exchanged three ineffectual shots, the seconds interfered, and adjusted the affair'. The meeting was in consequence of a report that the latter gentleman sent home to the Commissioners of the Customs, insinuating, that Mr Hinchcliffe leaned to the mercantile interest.
.
     Caveats entered in this Office [Secretary's].
On whose Estate. Samuel Reddish. By whom entered. Dorothy Reddish.
     Samuel died on 13 August 1812 in Martha Brae, Trelawney parish, Jamaica, aged 37. August 13th 1812. This morning at 1/2 past ten o'clock died Samuel Reddish, father of above at his house at Martha Brae on the island of Jamaica where he resided as Collector of His Majesty's customs at the Port of Falmouth.
He may be the father of William Reddish, mulatto born c. 1811, living at Kingston in 1817, and possibliity grandfather of Diana Reddish, born 1817, a creole of Trelawney.
. He was buried on 14 August 1812 in Trelawney paish.

Child of Samuel Reddish and Dorothy Ashby

Children of Samuel Reddish

Child of Samuel Reddish and J Cranston

twin Reddish

(circa 1779 - before 31 December 1785)
     Twin Reddish was born circa 1779 in England. He was the son of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello.
     Twin died before 31 December 1785. Samuel their father had only 3 three children at his death. Highfill states that they died young.

twin Reddish

(before 3 January 1779 - between 1783 and 1785)
     Twin Reddish was christened before 3 January 1779. She was the daughter of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello.
     Twin died between 1783 and 1785. She acted at Exeter aged 5 in 1783, but their father had only three children mentioned at his death. Highfill states that she was the twin of Samuel but the age suggests that she was the twin of Charles.

William Reddish

(circa 1780 - 1794)
     William Reddish was born circa 1780 in England. His half brother George Canning was frequently asked to pay the fees for his school in Yorkshire. Canning also met his medical expenses but his illness was fatal at a comparatively young age. He was the last Reddish child.. He was the son of Samuel Reddish and Mary Ann Costello.
     William and Charles Reddish were educated from 1789. The boys were transferred from schools in the west country to Scorton near Catterick in Yorkshire, kept by Rev James Milner.
     William died in 1794 in Yorkshire. He & his siblings were boarded with Rev Millar (Milner?)..

Ann Redfern

(circa 1620 - before 4 April 1651)
     Ann Redfern was born circa 1620.
     Ann Redfern married John Steer, son of Robert Steer and Elizabeth Senior?, on 31 October 1643 in Darley, Derbyshire. John Steer of Bridgetown & Anne Redferne of Tissington (or 1644?).
     Ann died before 4 April 1651 in Darley, Derbyshire. Mrs Anne Steer of Stancliffe. She was buried on 4 April 1651 in Darley, Derbyshire.

Children of Ann Redfern and John Steer

John Redfern

(circa 1620? - )
     John Redfern was born circa 1620? In Tissington.
     John Redfern married Catherine Steer, daughter of Robert Steer and Elizabeth Senior?, on 31 October 1643 in Darley, Derbyshire, England. She was still living in 1661.

Agnes Marie Redgrave

(circa 1856 - )
     Agnes Marie Redgrave was born circa 1856 in Birmingham, Warwickshire. She was the daughter of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur and Ann were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1861 census in 26 Exeter Row, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick and Mary were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1871 census in Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Agnes, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick, Gertrude and Alfred were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1881 census in 100 Balsall Heath Rd, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Agnes, Gertrude and Arthur were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1891 census in 10 Hales St, Coventry, Warwickshire.

Alfred Redgrave

(circa 1874 - )
     Alfred Redgrave was born circa 1874 in Birmingham, Warwickshire. He was the son of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams. Agnes, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick, Gertrude and Alfred were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1881 census in 100 Balsall Heath Rd, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire.

Alfred E Redgrave

(circa 1852 - )
     Alfred E Redgrave was born circa 1852 in Birmingham, Warwickshire. He was the son of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur and Ann were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1861 census in 26 Exeter Row, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick and Mary were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1871 census in Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire.

Angelina Marg... Redgrave

(before 30 September 1859 - )
     Angelina Marg... Redgrave was born before 30 September 1859 in Highgate, London. She was the daughter of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Caroline, Elijah, George, Rebecca and Angelina were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1861 census in 15? York Street?, St Pancras, London. Catherine, Maria, George, Rebecca, Angelina, Ezra, William and Ernest were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1871 census in 15? York Place, St Pancras, London. Maria, Rebecca, William, Ernest, Angelina and Arthur were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1881 census in 15 High St, St Pancras, London.

Ann Maria Redgrave

(circa March 1861 - )
     Ann Maria Redgrave was born circa March 1861 in Birmingham, Warwickshire. She was the daughter of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur and Ann were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1861 census in 26 Exeter Row, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick and Mary were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1871 census in Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Agnes, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick, Gertrude and Alfred were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1881 census in 100 Balsall Heath Rd, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire.

Arthur Redgrave

(between 1879 and 1880 - )
     Arthur Redgrave was born between 1879 and 1880. An Arthur Elisha Redgrave was registered in the March quarter of 1880 in the Aston district (Birmingham) and an Arthur John in the Sep quarter of 1879 in the Birmingham RD. He was the son of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Arthur Redgrave may have also been born September 1879 Birmingham, Warwickshire. Maria, Rebecca, William, Ernest, Angelina and Arthur were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1881 census in 15 High St, St Pancras, London.

Arthur John Redgrave

(June 1857 - )
     Arthur John Redgrave's birth was registered in the quarter ending in June 1857 in Birmingham, Warwickshire. He was the son of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur and Ann were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1861 census in 26 Exeter Row, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick and Mary were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1871 census in Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Agnes, Gertrude and Arthur were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1891 census in 10 Hales St, Coventry, Warwickshire.

Caroline Ann Redgrave

(13 September 1847 - 10 March 1942)
     Caroline Ann Redgrave was also known as Caroline Amelia in records. She was born on 13 September 1847 in Crick, Rugby RD, Northamptonshire, England. She was the daughter of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Caroline and Elijah were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1851 census in 6 Buckingham Place, Islington. Caroline, Elijah, George, Rebecca and Angelina were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1861 census in 15? York Street?, St Pancras, London.
     Caroline Ann Redgrave married Charles Porter on 15 June 1870 in the Registry Office, Brisbane, Queensland. She was a teacher aged 22 and he was a salesman aged 30, she was the daughter of Elijah Redgrave, fruiterer and his wife Caroline Wafford.
     Caroline died on 10 March 1942 in 121 Dudley St, Punchbowl, New South Wales, aged 94.

Children of Caroline Ann Redgrave and Charles Porter

Catherine Amelia Redgrave

(7 July 1851 - )
     Catherine Amelia Redgrave was also known as Amelia in records. She was born on 7 July 1851 in 6 Buckingham Place, Kings Cross, London. She was the daughter of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Catherine Amelia Redgrave was christened on 7 September 1851 in St Pancras Old Church, London. She was a visitor in the household of George Bills in the 1861 census in 30 Portsmouth Place, Lambeth, Surrey. George Bills, 39, proprietor of houses, born Mdx Somerstown?; his wife Catherine aged 26, born Seven Dials, their children George aged 4 & Catherine 6 months, both born Lambeth, Surrey and a visitor Catherine Redgrave aged 9, scholar, born Kings Cross, Mdx. Catherine, Maria, George, Rebecca, Angelina, Ezra, William and Ernest were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1871 census in 15? York Place, St Pancras, London.

Cornelius Redgrave

(1824 - 1922)
     Cornelius Redgrave was born in 1824. He was the son of Thomas Redgrave and Mary Whitnell.
     Cornelius died in 1922.

Elijah Redgrave

(before March 1827 - before 30 September 1896)
     Elijah Redgrave was born before March 1827 in Crick, Northamptonshire. He was the son of Thomas Redgrave and Mary Whitnell. Elijah Redgrave was christened on 15 April 1827 in Crick.
     Elijah Redgrave appeared on the 1841 census in the household of Thomas Redgrave in Lambeth, Surrey.
     Elijah Redgrave married Caroline Wafford, daughter of Thomas Wafford, on 19 October 1846 in St Pancras Church, London. Married in the parish church by licence on Oct 19 1846, Elijah Redgrave , full age, bachelor, farmer, of St Pancras, son of Thomas Redgrave, farmer, & Caroline Wafford, minor, spinster, of St Pancras, daughter of Thomas Wafford, dead. Both signed and the witnesses were Henry Pearce & Eliza Gardiner.
     Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford were recorded on the 1851 census in 6 Buckingham Place, Islington. Elijah Redgrave aged 24, greeengrocer born Crick, Northamptonshire, with his wife Caroline aged 22, born London, and children Caroline 3, born Crick, Elijah 1, born Henkfield?, Bershire and a visitor Ann Bills and an errand boy.
     Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford appeared on the 1861 census in 15? York Street?, St Pancras, London. Elijah Redgrave, 32, fruiterer, born Crick, Northamptonshire, with his wife Caroline 30, born Lambeth Surrey, and children Caroline Ann 14, born Crick, Elijah 12, born Winchfield, Hants?, George 6, born Highgate, Mdx, Rebecca 4, ditto, Angelina M 1, ditto.
     Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford appeared on the 1871 census in 15? York Place, St Pancras, London. Elijah Redgrave, 44, greengrocer, born Northamptonshire, with his wife Caroline 30, born Lambeth Surrey, and children Catherine 20, Wool depository, born St Pancras, Maria 18, born Highgate, George, 16, born Highgate, Rebecca 14, ditto, Angelina 12, ditto, Ezra? 10, ditto, William 8 ditto, Ernest 2, ditto. Elijah Redgrave was widowed before 30 June 1880 on the death of his wife Caroline Wafford.
     Elijah Redgrave appeared on the 1881 census in 15 High St, St Pancras, London. Elijah Redgrave, head, widower, 50, fruiterer, born Highgate, Mdx; Maria Redgrave, illegible, unmarried, 28, Rebecca Redgrave, unmarried 24, - Redgrave, son 19, Wm Redgrave, son 15, Ernest Redgrave, son 11, Angelina Redgrave,daughter 22, Aurther Redgrave, son, 1, all born at Highgate.
     Elijah Redgrave married secondly Emma Thornton in 1882 or 1883 in London. The marriage seems to be registered twice, Sep 1882 Strand RD and Mar 1883 in Pancras RD.
     Elijah Redgrave and Emma Thornton appeared on the 1891 census in 33 Grovedale Rd, Islington, Middlesex. Elijah Redgrave, aged 64, married with no occupation, born Crick residing as father with his daughter Maria married to John Stanbridge and their 6 children. There was also an Emma Redgrave, married aged 50 born St Albans, Herts, listed next to him.
     Elijah's death was registered in the quarter ending before 30 September 1896 in Islington, London.

Children of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford

Elijah Redgrave

(28 May 1849 - )
     Elijah Redgrave was born on 28 May 1849 in Henkfield? or Winchfield, Easthampstead, Berkshire. He was the son of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Caroline and Elijah were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1851 census in 6 Buckingham Place, Islington. Elijah Redgrave was christened on 7 September 1851 in St Pancras Old Church, London. Caroline, Elijah, George, Rebecca and Angelina were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1861 census in 15? York Street?, St Pancras, London.
     Elijah Redgrave appeared on the 1871 census in 9 Rochester Tce, Edmonton, London. Elijah Redgrave, son, unmarried 21, fruiterer, born Windsor, Berks (in separate household) but the next building contained Euphemia Redgrave, married, aged 50, no occupation, born Kent.
     Elijah Redgrave married Mary Pledger between July 1875 and September 1875 in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey.
     Elijah Redgrave appeared on the 1881 census in Market Place, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey. Elijah Redgrave, head, 31, born Berkshire, fruiterer & florist & his wife Lydia Redgrave aged 29 born St Albans, Berkshire.

Elisha Redgrave

(21 June 1829 - September 1901)
     Elisha Redgrave was christened on 21 June 1829 in Crick, Northamptonshire. He was the son of Thomas Redgrave and Mary Whitnell.
     Elisha Redgrave appeared on the 1841 census in the household of Thomas Redgrave in Lambeth, Surrey.
     Elisha Redgrave married Mary Williams on 22 December 1850 in St Mark, Birmingham, Warwickshire.
     Elisha Redgrave appeared on the 1861 census in 26 Exeter Row, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Elisha Redgrave, head, m, 32, auctioneer & appraiser, born Crick, Northamptonshire; his wife Mary, 29, born Birmingham; sons Alfred E 9, George E 7, Agnes Marie, 5, Arthur John 4, Ann Maria 1 month, all born Birmingham, with Emily Walters, servant.
     Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams appeared on the 1871 census in Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Elisha Redgrave, head, 40?, auctioneers accountant ... agent, born Crick, Northamptonshire, his wife Mary 39, born Berkhampstead??, children Alfred E, 19 auctioneer's clerk, George E 14, estate agency clerk, Agnes M, 15, Arthur J 14, Ann M 10, Fanny 8, Florence 6, Frederick 4, Mary A 2, all born Birmingham, with a servant Mary A Read.
     Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams appeared on the 1881 census in 100 Balsall Heath Rd, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Elisha Redgrave, 52, auctioneer & estate agent, born Crick, with his wife Mary aged 49, born Birmingham, children Agnes M 25, Ann M 20, Fanny 18, Florence 16, Frederick 15, apprentice, Gertrude 9, Alfred 7 scholar, all born at Birmingham.
     Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams appeared on the 1891 census in 10 Hales St, Coventry, Warwickshire. Elisha Redgrave, head, married, 62, publican, born Crick, Northamptonshire; Mary his wife aged 59, Agnes Clarke, daughter, married, 35, Arthur J Redgrave, son 33, storekeeper? ..., Gertrude Redgrave, daughter, single, 19, all born in Birmingham, Agnes B Clark, grand daughter 7, born Philadelphia USA, Arthur T? Clarke, grand son, 1, born Poleworth, Warwickshire.
     Elisha's death was registered in the quarter ending in September 1901 in Aston RD, Warwickshire.

Children of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams

Ernest Redgrave

(before April 1869 - )
     Ernest Redgrave was born before April 1869 in Highgate, London. He was the son of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Catherine, Maria, George, Rebecca, Angelina, Ezra, William and Ernest were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1871 census in 15? York Place, St Pancras, London. Maria, Rebecca, William, Ernest, Angelina and Arthur were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1881 census in 15 High St, St Pancras, London.

Ezra Redgrave

(before April 1861 - )
     Ezra Redgrave was born before April 1861 in Highgate, London. He was the son of Elijah Redgrave and Caroline Wafford. Catherine, Maria, George, Rebecca, Angelina, Ezra, William and Ernest were listed as the children of Elijah Redgrave in the 1871 census in 15? York Place, St Pancras, London.

Ezra Redgrave

(13 August 1837 - )
     Ezra Redgrave was christened on 13 August 1837 in Crick, Northamptonshire. He was the son of Thomas Redgrave and Mary Whitnell.

Fanny Redgrave

(circa 1863 - )
     Fanny Redgrave was born circa 1863 in Birmingham, Warwickshire. She was the daughter of Elisha Redgrave and Mary Williams. Alfred, George, Agnes, Arthur, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick and Mary were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1871 census in Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Agnes, Ann, Fanny, Florence, Frederick, Gertrude and Alfred were listed as the children of Elisha Redgrave in the 1881 census in 100 Balsall Heath Rd, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire.