Sir Herbert de Ros

     Sir Herbert de Ros was born in England. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.

Isabel de Ros

(circa 1244 - 12 June 1356)
     Isabel de Ros was born circa 1244. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Isabel de Ros married Walter de Fauconberg 2nd Baron.
     Isabel died on 12 June 1356.

Isabel de Ros

     Isabel de Ros was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
     Isabel de Ros married Marmaduke Thwenge circa 1278.

Ivette de Ros

( - before 1331)
     Ivette de Ros was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
     Ivette de Ros married Geoffrey le Scrope (Lord of Masham).
     Ivette died before 1331. She was buried in Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire.

Child of Ivette de Ros and Geoffrey le Scrope (Lord of Masham)

Joan de Ros

(circa 1252 - 13 October 1348)
     Joan de Ros was born circa 1252. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Joan died on 13 October 1348. She married John Lovell, 1st Baron Lovell of Tichmarch.

John de Ros

(1386 - 1421)
     John de Ros was born in 1386. He was the eldest son of William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros and Margaret Fitzalan. His mother was a daughter of John Fitzalan and Eleanor Maltravers.
He served as a soldier of Henry V of England during the Hundred Years' War. Six years after the Battle of Agincourt, John participated in the Battle of Baugé. He was among the casualties along with his brother William de Ros, Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, the governor of Normandy and others. He was buried at the Belvoir Priory.
He was married to Margaret Despencer but no children are known to have resulted from this marriage. He was the son of William de Ros 7th Baron.
     John died in 1421.

Sir John de Ros

     This John is probably the father of Lucy Audley/Ryther, not the son of Robert as stated in "Complete Peerage". Sir John de Ros was born in Yorkshire. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
     Sir John de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Lucy de Ros and Sir Alexander de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280. There is speculation that Lucy's reputed father John was really her brother and both were siblings of Robert her reputed grandfather.

John de Ros 6th Baron

(1365 - 1394)
     John de Ros 6th Baron was born in 1365. He was the son of Thomas de Ros 5th Baron.
     John died in 1394 in Pathos, Cyprus.

John de Ros Bishop of Carlisle

( - 1332)
     John de Ros Bishop of Carlisle was the son of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     John Ravilious wrote on the Medieval Mailing list: The statement in the IPM of 1491 identifying John de Ros as 'son of Robert Roos' appears to be in error. In a prior post, I noted that John de Ros may well have been the brother, not the son of Sir Robert de Ros (d. 1285). Two reasons support that suggestion:
1. The fine dated 1280 provides for reversion of the manors to John de Ros, 'with remainders to Alexander, John's brother...' Sir Robert de Ros (d. 1285) had no known son Alexander; however, he did have younger brothers John and Alexander, the latter of whom was identified in a charter of Sir Robert, enfeoffing Thomas de Werke, chaplain, in certain lands in Helmsley, dated 1264x1285. This charter was witnessed by his brothers Sir Peter, Sir William, Sir Alexander and Sir Herbert ("Hiis testibus: Dominis Petro de Ros, Willelmo de Ros, Alexandro de Ros, Herberto de Ros, militibus et fratribus..")[3]
2. The chronology of the generations does not readily support the filiation in the 1491 IPM (and in CP XI:8). Sir William de Ros, eldest son and heir of Sir Robert, was born 1255 or before (he was aged 30 and more at his father's death), and his mother Isabel de Aubigny was born ca. 1233. It is not reasonable to place Lucy de Ros, widow of Henry de Audley b. 1251, d. 1276 or before) and married 2ndly in 1280 or before to William de Ryther, as the daughter of a man (son of Sir Robert de Ros and Isabel de Aubigny) who would himself likely have been born 1255 or later, and very possibly after 1260.
If in fact Lucy was the daughter of John de Ros, he was therefore certainly the brother, not son, of Sir Robert. Lucy his daughter would therefore have been the namesake of her paternal grandmother, Lucy (daughter of Piers fitz Herbert of Blaen Llyfni).
The identification of Lucy, wife of (1) Henry de Audley and (2) Sir William de Ryther as daughter of John de Ros is not proven, but is probable based on the evidence in hand. The entail of Gildehusdale and the other lands on 'the heirs of Lucy's body', with reversion to John de Ros and remainder to his brother Alexander, is indicative of a family transaction
.
     Fine dated 1280: 28. York. Morrow of Hil. 8 Edw I. Before the same. Between John, son of Robert de Ros of Hamelak, quer., and William de Rither, deforc. [seller], of the manors of Rither, Schardecroft, Gyldhusum' and the advowson of Rither church. Covenant. John's right as of William's gift. John and his heirs to hold of the chief lords. William and his heirs to warrant. For a sore sparrowhawk.
This feoffment was the first stage of a settlement. The second fine as given by John took place very soon after, on February 2 1280.
54. York. Morrow of Cand. Before the same. Between William de Ryther, quer., and John de Ros, deforc., [seller] of the manors of Ryther, Scarthecroft and Gildehus' with the advowson of Ryther church. Covenant. John's right. William and Lucy his wife and the heirs of Lucy's body to hold of the chief lords with remainder to William and reversion after William's death to John and the heirs of his body with remainders to Alexander, John's brother, and the heirs of his body and to William's next heirs.

Rosie Bevan wrote: The two fines had a threefold purpose - feoffment, marriage jointure, and protection against wardship of the lands in case of a minority.
That Gildersdale was of the fee of Ros at the time of the settlement, there is no question - it is listed in Feudal Aids with Robert's holding as chief lord given in the past tense, meaning its tenure was recorded just after his decease in 1285. Its two carucates had descended to the Ros family via the Trussebuts, with William de Ros inheriting it on the death of his aunt Agatha in 1247. It is possible that John had been enfeoffed in this manor, but there are indications that Rithers were tenants long before it passed into Ros posession, and the marriage settlement shows that it was unlikely to have been Lucy's maritagium.
The settlement of the Ryther lands on Lucy and her issue is characteristic of a jointure, an increasingly preferred method of marrying off daughters without reducing the family estate by the end of the thirteenth century. A sum of money passed hands as the bride's marriage portion, and in return there was a settlement of the groom's lands on her for life. The jointure also protected the issue of the marriage from claims by other children of the husband from earlier or later marriages. Most importantly if the husband died leaving a widow and underage children, the lord did not have wardship of that land.
John de Ros must have been related to Lucy in some way. Usually the principals of a marriage jointure were the father or brother providing dowry, but in this case it is possible that being a secondary marriage it was only a small one, and with Lucy's youth, William Rither was more interested in her Audley dower.
Chronology goes against Lucy being daughter of John, but she may certainly have been a younger daughter of Robert de Ros and Isabel D'Aubigny who were married around 1244. We would expect them to have had a daughter called Lucy, named after Robert's mother. At a guess it is possible that John and Alexander were clerics and did not expect to leave heirs. The reversion to them on the death of William in the event of lack of heirs would represent a refund of the marriage portion, with the lands ultimately passing to William's right heirs after their death.
As it happens, the Ryther lands did pass down William's direct line, so the fine clearly served its primary intent. Notably, while Scarcroft and Ryther descended with his heirs, there is no mention of Gildersdale in the 1491 inquisition for Robert Ryther, so it appears to have passed out of the family in the intervening 211 years
.
     A record of a deed done during his mother's lifetime, before 15 June 1301:
[Late 13th cent.] - Deed of feoffment by Richard, the clerk, son of Philip de Beuver to John son of Sir Robert de Ros, of a toft and croft, with appurtenances, within and without the vill of Beuver, lying between the king's (high) way and the land of William the miller, and formerly held by Alice le Rede, to be held of the lady Isabel de Ros and
her heirs by the due and accustomed services.
Hiis testibus: Johanne Wade de Botlisford tunc ballivo de Beuver; Rogero Wade de Botlisford; Roberto Basset de Wlstorp; Galfrido Kingesheie de Beuver; Roberto pistore de eadem. Pointed oval seal of Richard.
     John died in 1332. He was mentioned at the Inquisition Post Mortem held in Yorkshire, on 3 August 1491 on the death of Sir Robert Ryther. Robert Ryther, knt. Writ wanting; inquisition 3 Aug 6 Hen.VII. He died seized of the under-mentioned moiety of the manor of Harwod in tail male, by the gift of Thomas Thwates, and William Barker, made by way of fine, with the King's licence, to one William Ryther, Knt, and Sibyl his wife, thereof, in tail male, with remainder in default to the right heirs, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Sibyl, viz., son of William, son of William their son.
He also died seized in tail male of the under-mentioned manor and advowson of Ryther, by virtue of the gift thereof made by John son of Robert Roos, by way of fine and with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Lucy, viz, son of William, son of William, son of William, son of Robert, son of Robert, son of Robert their son.
He died the last day of June last, seized of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee. Ralph Ryther, esq. aged 40 or more, is his brother and next heir.
York. A moiety in the manor of Harwod, in Harwod, Dunkyswyk and Helthwayt, worth 25l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.
Manor and advowson of the parish church of Ryther, in Ryther, Ossendak, and Stokbryge, worth 100 marks, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, as of the honour of Pontfrett, by service of 1/8 of a knight's fee.
Manor of Skarcroft, worth 10l., held of Henry Wavasour, knt., by the rent of a rose in the time of roses if required.
A moiety of the manor of Kyrkeby Overblowers, worth 4 marks, held of Henry, Earl of Northumberland, as of the manor of Spofford, by fealty, other services unknown.
Three messuages and 40 a. meadow and pasture in Kyrkeby on Wharffe, worth 40s, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, by fealty only
.

Lucy de Ros

(circa 1270 - )
     Lucy de Ros was born circa 1270 in Helmsley, Yorkshire. Complete Peerage states, after a correction in Vol XIV, that Lucy was 'da. of John de Ros, son of Robert de Ros of Helmsley'. They cite (a) Exch Inq p.m. 170/7 and (b) Gen Plantagenet Harrison's Notes which cited De Banco Rolls, 21 Hen VI, m. 128 d, where her portion is said to have been the manor of Gildhusdale, which was of the fee of Ros in 1284 (Book of Fees, vol vi.p. 50).. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Lucy de Ros married Henry Audley. Lucy de Ros was widowed before 22 April 1276 on the death of her husband Henry Audley.
     Lucy de Ros married Sir William Ryther as her second husband, circa 1280. He married, in or before 1280 Lucy, ?daughter of John de Ros, son of Robert, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley. At the Inquisition Post Mortem for Robert Ryther (6 Hen VII) it is mentioned that he held the manor & advowson of Ryther, by virtue of gift made by John, son of Robert Roos, by way of fine & with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William ....
     Lucy de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Sir John de Ros and Sir Alexander de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280. There is debate whether her reported father John (son of Robert) was really her brother along with Robert.
     Staff. and Salop. William de Ryther and Lucy his wife sued William de Audidelegh for a third of the manor of Helley (Heleigh), Dymmesdale, and Boteresdon, and for a third of the passagium of Wrimestrete, and of the advowson of Audelegh; for a third of the manors of Betteley, Dunestall, and of the vills of Borewardeslyme (Burslem), Talk, Knotton, and Thurfeld, and for a third of a rent of 20s. and of a dozen knives (cutellorum), and of half a pound of cumin in Newcastle-under-Lyme, one-third of a water mill in Chaveldon, a third of 10s. rent in Ruston, a third of 2s. rent in Ridierd, a third of 12s. rent in Stanle in co. Stafford, and a third of the vill of Forde, and of two parts of Marchumley, Weston, Redcastle, Kentenesdon, Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, and of a third of 10s. rent in Moston in co. Salop as her dower, of the gift of Henry de Audidelegh her first husband.
William appeared and stated he only held a virgate of land in Dymmesdale, and 6d. rent in Boteresdon, and a bovate of land in Knotton, and that Ela the widow of James de Audelegh held a mark of rent in Newcastleunder-Lyme, and she also held a third of his tenements in Riston (Rushton), Ridiert, Stanle, Wymerstrete, and Audelegh and Moston; and in Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, he only held the services of John de Lakne, Robert de Wykeshull, and William de Haukeston; and this was the whole of his tenure when Lucy sued out her writ, viz., on 2nd November, 8 E. I., and he appealed to a jury, and William de Rither and Lucy likewise. The Sheriff is ordered to summon a jury for five weeks from Easter. m. 49, dorso
.
     Record of a suit against her brother-in-law William de Audley, 2 Nov 1281: Staff. and Salop. William de Ryther and Lucy his wife sued William de Audidelegh for a third of the manor of Helley (Heleigh), Dymmesdale, and Boteresdon, and for a third of the passagium of Wrimestrete, and of the advowson of Audelegh; for a third of the manors of Betteley, Dunestall, and of the vills of Borewardeslyme (Burslem), Talk, Knotton, and Thurfeld, and for a third of a rent of 20s. and of a dozen knives (cutellorum), and of half a pound of cumin in Newcastle-under-Lyme, one-third of a water mill in Chaveldon, a third of 10s. rent in Ruston, a third of 2s. rent in Ridierd, a third of 12s. rent in Stanle in co. Stafford, and a third of the vill of Forde, and of two parts of Marchumley, Weston, Redcastle, Kentenesdon, Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, and of a third of 10s. rent in Moston in co. Salop as her dower, of the gift of Henry de Audidelegh her first husband.
William appeared and stated he only held a virgate of land in Dymmesdale, and 6d. rent in Boteresdon, and a bovate of land in Knotton, and that Ela the widow of James de Audelegh held a mark of rent in Newcastle-under-Lyme, and she also held a third of his tenements in Riston (Rushton), Ridiert, Stanle, Wymerstrete, and Audelegh and Moston; and in Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, he only held the services of John de Lakne, Robert de Wykeshull, and William de Haukeston; and this was the whole of his tenure when Lucy sued out her writ, viz., on 2nd November, 8 E. I., and he appealed to a jury, and William de Rither and Lucy likewise.
The Sheriff is ordered to summon a jury for five weeks from Easter. m. 49, dorso
.
     A Chancery document dated 20 Nov 1293 (22 Edw I) for William de Rither and Lucy his wife grants land in Ryther to the Master and brethren of St Nicholas in York in exchange for land there, retaining the manor of Ryther.
     In 30 Jan 1293/4, she was the subject of an inquisition ad quod damnum with her husband William de Ryther and the hospital of St. Nicholas York. A licence for the above was granted 3 Jul 1294.
     In March 1311/2 she was bequeathed a gold ring by William le Vavasour. Lucy de Ros was mentioned at the Inquisition Post Mortem held in Yorkshire, on 3 August 1491 on the death of Sir Robert Ryther. Robert Ryther, knt. Writ wanting; inquisition 3 Aug 6 Hen.VII. He died seized of the under-mentioned moiety of the manor of Harwod in tail male, by the gift of Thomas Thwates, and William Barker, made by way of fine, with the King's licence, to one William Ryther, Knt, and Sibyl his wife, thereof, in tail male, with remainder in default to the right heirs, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Sibyl, viz., son of William, son of William their son.
He also died seized in tail male of the under-mentioned manor and advowson of Ryther, by virtue of the gift thereof made by John son of Robert Roos, by way of fine and with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Lucy, viz, son of William, son of William, son of William, son of Robert, son of Robert, son of Robert their son.
He died the last day of June last, seized of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee. Ralph Ryther, esq. aged 40 or more, is his brother and next heir.
York. A moiety in the manor of Harwod, in Harwod, Dunkyswyk and Helthwayt, worth 25l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.
Manor and advowson of the parish church of Ryther, in Ryther, Ossendak, and Stokbryge, worth 100 marks, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, as of the honour of Pontfrett, by service of 1/8 of a knight's fee.
Manor of Skarcroft, worth 10l., held of Henry Wavasour, knt., by the rent of a rose in the time of roses if required.
A moiety of the manor of Kyrkeby Overblowers, worth 4 marks, held of Henry, Earl of Northumberland, as of the manor of Spofford, by fealty, other services unknown.
Three messuages and 40 a. meadow and pasture in Kyrkeby on Wharffe, worth 40s, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, by fealty only
.

Children of Lucy de Ros and Sir William Ryther

Lucy de Ros

(before 1280 - )
     Lucy de Ros was born before 1280. She was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
     Lucy de Ros married Sir? Robert de Plumpton.

Lucy de Ros

(say 1230 - after 1279)
     Lucy de Ros was born say 1230. She was the daughter of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
     Lucy de Ros married William de Kyme circa 1247. Lucy de Ros was widowed before 3 September 1259 on the death of her husband William de Kyme.
     She was still been living in Easter Term, 1275, when she was summoned to answer Ralph de Normanville in a plea.
     Lucy died after 1279. She was buried in Grey Friars church, York.
     Lucy de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Sir John de Ros and Sir Alexander de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280. If Lucy is the sister of John & Alexander, she is probably the Lucy who married William Kyme. However the dating is unlikely.

Child of Lucy de Ros and William de Kyme

Mary de Ros (Brewes)

(circa 1245 - 23 May 1326)
     Mary de Ros (Brewes) was born circa 1245. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Mary de Ros (Brewes) married William de Braose Lord of Bramber & Gower before 1271. She was his 3rd wife, He was the son of John de Braose and Margaret ap Llewellyn. Margaret was a daughter of Llewellin the Great.
     Mary died on 23 May 1326.

Nicholas de Ros

(before 1357 - )
     Nicholas de Ros was born before 1357. He was the son of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Nicholas de Ros was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held on 8 May 1397 Nicholas Roos, Clerk. Writ, 8 May 20 Richard II 893. Lincoln. Inq. taken at Donyngton in Holand, Thursday before St. Duncan, 20 Richard II.
He held the under-mentioned manors and lands in his demesne as of fee.
Gedney. ...
Tydde. ...
Wywell. ...
Normanby [and] Claxby. ...
He died on 5 May, 20 Richard II. James Roos, knight, aged 50 years and more, is his brother and heir.
Writ, 8 May 20 Richard II
894. York. Inq. taken at Brydlington, 28 May, 20 Richard II.
Hundmanby. ...
... Date of death and heir, aged 40 years and more, as above.
C. Ric. II File 95 (9). E. Enrollments etc. of Inq. No. 322 (York)
.

Peter de Ros

     Peter de Ros was the son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland.

Piers or Peter de Ros

(say 1090 - 1157?)
     He was steward (dapifer) of the Count of Aumale, lord of Holderness. He gave 2 carucates of land in Gilling, near Helmsley, and the church to St Mary's Abbey, York.
(a) Anschetil and Geoffrey de Ros, whose names are found in the i i th century among those of the knights of the Archbishop of Canterbury, took their name from Rots, 5 miles from Caen (Domesday Monachorum, ed. Douglas-R. Hist. Soc.-p 29-30, 8 5-87, 105); as did also Serlon de Ros, who in 1086 held land under Hugh de
Beauchamp in Beds (Round, in F.C.H. Beds, vol. i, P. 201). There seems no reason to connect Ros of Helmsley with these or later persons of the name in Kent and Essex),
(b) His s. and h. Everard describes himself, and is described, variously, as s. c Piers, s. of Piers de Rossa, s. of Piers the Steward of Holderness (Farrer, Earl Yks charters., vol. iii, PP. 82, 52; Vol. ii, PP. 44, 441). Piers's yr. s., Robert de Ros the Constable, styles himself son of Piers the Steward (Selby Coucher Book, Yorks Arch Soc., vol. i, P. 321).
(c) Early Yorks Charters, vol. i, p. 273.
(d) The foundation-charters of the first two mention Everard and Robert de Ros sons of his yst. sister Adeline (Dugdale, Mon., vol. vi, p. 208; Rievaulx Chartular Surtees Soc., p. 21). Piers or Peter de Ros was born say 1090. His parentage is unknown, he probably derived his name from Ros in Holderness Yorks (East Riding).
     Piers or Peter de Ros married Adeline Espec, daughter of William Speche, before 1109.
     Piers died in 1157? In Helmsley, Yorkshire. Clay, 1913 states that he died in 1157 and was buried at Rievaulx Abbey.
He inherited his brother-in-law's estate of Helmsley, who died in March 1154!
Piers predeceased Walter Espec and was presumably dead in 1130. (Archbishop Thurstan confirmed (circa 1130-33) the church of Atwick to Bridlington Priory, with consent of Everard, s. of Piers (Ear Yorks Charters, vol. iii, p. 82).
His widow also died before her brother.(After whose death, presumably between Mich. 1157 and Mich. 1158, h, son Robert offered 1000 marks for his share of the Espec inheritance. Pipe Rc, 4 Hen. II, pp. i 4o, 146).

Children of Piers or Peter de Ros and Adeline Espec

Piers de Ros

(after 1173 - )
     Piers de Ros was born after 1173. He was the son of Everard de Ros and Rose Trussebut.

Piers de Ros

     Piers de Ros was also known as Peter in records. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.

Robert de Ros

(1265 - between 1298 and 1361)
     Robert de Ros was also known as Robert de Ros (Of Gedney) in records. He was born in 1265. He had younger sons Robert, John and Nicholas. He was the son of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Robert died between 1298 and 1361. He took part in the Scotch expedition, 26 Edward I. Other sources suggest before 1311. His wife was Erneburge..
     Robert de Ros was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held on 20 December 1381 Robert de Roos of Gedney, Knight. Writ:20 December, 5 Richard II
578. Lincoln. Inq. taken at Lincoln, Wednesday before St. Hilary, 5 Richard II. He held the under-mentioned manors in his demesne as of fee.
Gedney. The manor, held of the honor Aumale by service of a sixth part of knight's fee.
Wywell and Honggerton. The manor, held of Thomas de Roos, lord of Belvoir, by service of 20s. rent yearly for ward of the castle of Belvoir.
He died on Wednesday after St. Nicholas last. Nicholas de Roos his brother, aged 40 years and more, is his heir.
Writ:20 December, 5 Richard II
579. York. Inq. taken at Hundmanby, Thursday after St. Hilary, 5 Richard II. He held the under-mentioned part of a manor, messuages, lands and rents in his demesne as of fee.
Hundmanby. ...
Bryghton. ...
Melburn. ...
... Date of death as above. Heir as above, aged 56 years and more.
C. Ric. II. File 21 (8)
E. Enrollments &c. of Inq. No. 212 (I) (Lincoln).
.

Robert de Ros

(before 1125 - circa 1162)
     Robert de Ros was born before 1125. He was the son of Piers or Peter de Ros and Adeline Espec.
     Robert de Ros married Sibyl de Valognes.
     Robert de Ros, brother and heir of Everard, confirmed (1147-53) to Rievaulx the gift of his uncle Walter Espec, for the souls of his said uncle his father and brother Everard (a). He was sometime constable, probably to the Count of Aumale, lord,of Holderness.(b) As Robert de Ros he attested a charter of Count William about 1150, and Henry II's charter to Scarborough, where, for several years from 1158, he was in charge of works at the King's castle.(c) He m. Sibyl de VALOGNES,(d) and d. in 1162 or 1 163.(e) His widow M., 2ndly, circa 1166, William DE PEltey,(f) who d. probably in I 174 or 117 S; and 3rdly, in i 18 1 or 1182, Ralph D'AuBbiny (br. of William D'AUBIGNY of Belvoir), who d. before Mich. 1192. (9) She was living in 1212, possibly in 1218, and was bier. at Nun Appleton Priory.(h)
(a) Rievaulx Chartulary, p. 21. The original charter at Belvoir bears an equestrian seal (11ist. MSS. Com., Rutland MSS., vol. iv, P. 75).
(b) Possibly from about i x 5 3 till his death (Early Yorks Charters, vol. iii, pp. 37,40,47). He styled himself Rodbertus de Ros, Constabularius, filius Petri Dapiferi, in his grant to Selby Abbey (Coucher Book, loc cit.)
(c) Early Yorks Charters, vol. iii, p. gi; vol. i, P. 284; PiPe Roll, 4 Hen. II, p. 146; etc. On the death of Robert de Ros money was owing to the Crown upon the work at Scarborough; his son's lands were charged with the debt, and put in custody of Ranulf de Glanville (Red Book of the Exchequer, Rolls Ser., p. +32; Pipe Roll, 23 Hen. II, p. 2x).
(d) See ante, vol. x, p. 44x, note '%" SUb PERCY.
(e) Pipe Roll, 9 Hen. II, p. 58.
(f) Who gave 400 marks for the marriage (1dem, 12 Hen. II, p. 41).
(g) See ante, vol. x, p. 442, note "c," and P. 444, note "d."
(h) Idem, p. 443:-'

Clay, 1913 states that he was Lord of Helmsley or Hamlake; dead 1166. His wife Sybil Valoniis remarried Ralph de Albini, second son of William de Albini, Lord of Belvoir..
     Robert died circa 1162.

Child of Robert de Ros and Sibyl de Valognes

Robert de Ros

( - before 20 April 1274)
     Robert de Ros was the son of Robert de Ros Baron Ros of Werke.
     Robert de Ros, of Wark on Tweed, Northumberland and Sanquhar, Nithsdale younger son, made heir to father.
His lands evidently included the manor of Bellester (or Bellister) in Tynedale, originally part of the maritagium of his ancestress Isabel of Scotland. (cf. restoration of same to his descendant Gerard Salvayn)
'Robert de Ros, junior', one of the sureties for William de Kyme in a complaint by William Bardolf, 1253 Pleas of the Crown 31-32.
'Extent of the manor of Kyrkeby in Kendale, with the castle (under writ, dated Westminster, 20 April preceding, directing the K.'s escheator ultra Trent, to make an extent of the lands of the deceased Robert de Ros of Werk, both of his own heritage, and that of Margaret his wife), made of Monday next, after the quinzaine of Holy Trinity...
The jurors say that said manor has fallen in the purparty of Margaret de Ros, the last born daughter and one of the heirs of Peter de Brus, [and is held of the K. in capite. '
[Bain II:4-5[4], cites Inq. p. m., 2 Edw. I. No. 26.]
Children: Robert (-<1310), William (-<1310), of Kendal.
     Robert de Ros married Margaret de Brus, daughter of Piers de Brus and Hawise de Lancaster. She was the 3rd sister and coheiress of her brother Piers de Brus, inheritance included barony of Kendal, Westmoreland divided between her son William and nephew Marmaduke de Thweng gave charter of the forest of Rydal and her share of Ambleside and Loughrigg, held of her by Sir Roger de Lancaster, illeg. brother of her mother.
Re: her claim as coheiress of the Earl of Aum[ale, see Blakely.
Father: Piers de Brus (-1240), of Skelton and Danby in Cleveland
Mother: Hawise de Lancaster, heiress of Kendal

Children: Robert (-<1310), William (-<1310), of Kendal.
     Chris Phillips wrote in response to Douglas Richardson who recommended Hedley's Northumberland Families (1968), pp. 224-229: The problem is that there is that one piece of evidence cited by MichaelAnne - the IPM mentioning a Christiana as widow of "Robert de Ros, son of Robert de Ros of Werk" - which cannot be reconciled with Hedley's solution. There is also an associated entry on the fine roll (Cal. Fine Rolls i 32; cited by Complete Peerage) that says the same thing.
This is why several different reconstructions of the family have been published - one in Complete Peerage, which makes Christine Bertram the wife of Robert, the father of Robert the husband of Margaret, and another in History of Northumberland, which makes her the wife of Robert, the son of Robert and Margaret. Then there is Hedley, who makes her the wife of William, the brother of Robert the husband of Margaret.
The unfortunate thing is that Hedley doesn't comment on the problematic inquisition at all, so it's not clear whether he was even aware of the difficulty.
I think on the whole Hedley's solution does make most sense, and the references to a Christiana widow of Robert probably have to be set aside as an error. But it would be nice to have some definite proof that the Robert of this IPM was the husband of Margaret. The manor of Cargo later passed to Ros of Kendal, descendants of William, the younger son of Robert and Margaret, but it doesn't seem to be known how or when it first came to the family.
     Robert died before 20 April 1274.

Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron

(circa 1213 - 17 May 1285)
     Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron was born circa 1213. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
     Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron married Isabel D'Aubigne, daughter of William D'Aubigne Brito IV and Albreda or Isabel Biseth, between 5 June 1243 and 17 May 1244. He began to update Helmsley Castle in the third quarter of the thirteenth century. His wealth and social standing were bolstered by marrying Isabel Daubeney of Belvoir, who brought with her extensive estates in the east midlands. Robert was summoned to parliament as Lord Ros of Helmsley. He became the 7th Lord of Belvoir.
     On July 3, 1257, Ros obtained from Henry III a grant of the free warren, in the lordship of Belvoir, by which the boundary was determined. In 1258, he was actively employed in Scotland, in delivering King Alexander III of Scotland out of the hands of his rebellious subjects; and at Chester, in resisting the hostile invasions of Llewelyn the Last. In the same year, he and his lady Isabel had a controversy with the Prior and Convent of Belvoir, relative to the right of presentation to the Church of Redmile (near Bottesford), which was amicably compromised by their relinquishing the patronage to the convent, for a certain compensation. In 1261 he obtained from the king the grant of a weekly market, to be held at Belvoir, on Tuesday; and of an annual fair on the feast of St John the Baptist, to continue for three days. In 1264, he was one of the insurgent barons who defeated Henry III at the battle of Lewes, and took him and the prince prisoner, confining them in Hungerford Castle. In 1264, de Ros was summoned to the parliament, which was called by the barons in the king's name.
     Sir Robert de Ros, s. and h., of Belvoir,(a) in Aug. 1258 was a chief commissioner in co. Hereford.(b) In that year, as Robert de Ros of Belvoir, and later, he was summoned for service in Scotland, and against the Welsh;(e) also, in Mar. 1260 and Oct. 1261 to London with all his service due, and, in Oct. 1263, to Windsor, with the horses' and arms which he brought to London, to treat of matters touching the realm.(d) He sided with Simon de Montfort in Mar. 1263/4;(f) and was holding Northampton, under the younger Simon 'when the King took it in April.(g) On 24 Dec. [1261?] he was summoned as Robert de Ros to (de Montfort's) Parl. in London.(h) On 18 May. 1265 Prince Edward escaped from his custody at Hereford. Robert surrendered Gloucester Castle to the Prince, 29 June.(i) On 14 Aug., 10 days after the battle of Evesham, at the Prince's instance, Robert received a full pardon.(j)
He was a benefactor of the canons of Owston, Lincs, and of Warter Priory, Yorks (Hist. MSS. Com., Rutland Papers, vol. iv, p. 9; Dugdale. Mon., vol. Vi, P. 300)
.
     In 1261 the Sheriff of Lincs was notified that Robert de Ros of Belvoir was pardoned for tourneying at Pontefract, against the King's order.(e) He sided with Simon de Montfort in Mar. 1263/4; (f) and was holding Northampton, under the younger Simon 'when the King took it in April.(g) On 24 Dec. he was sum. as Robert de Ros to (de Montfort's) Parl. in London.(h) On 18 May 1265 Prince Edward escaped from his custody at Hereford. Robert surrendered Gloucester Castle to the Prince, 29 June.(i) On 14 Aug., 10 days after the battle of Evesham, at the Prince's instance, Robert received a full pardon.      
Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron was summoned to Parliament in 1264.
     A charter of Sir Robert, witnessed by his brothers Sir Peter, Sir William, Sir Alexander and Sir Herbert Hiis testibus:
Dominis Petro de Ros, Willelmo de Ros, Alexandro de Ros, Herberto de Ros, militibus et fratribus..." ] enfeoffing
Thomas de Werke, chaplain, in certain lands in Helmsley
.
     He was a commissioner in the North, Sep. 1268 for the Aid - granted to the King and was pardoned £200 of the relief due from him as heir to his father.
     In Nov. 1276 he was one of the magnates, who, in Council at Westminster, gave judgement against Llewelyn and was sum. for the consequent campaign.
     He had protection in Apr. 1277, on going to the shrine of St Edmund, at Pontigny.
     Robertus de Ros, dominus de Beuver.....advocatus prioratus de
Wartria ', confirmed the grants of his predecessors (incl. the church of St. James) to Warter priory, on St. Michael's Day, 1279
.
     He was summoned, 28 June 1283, to the Assembly at Shrewsbury, as was (presumably his son) William de Ros.
     Robert died on 17 May 1285 in Belvoir?, Rutland. He was described as "of Belvoir", Rutland, 13 Edw I.
     Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held on 12 June 1285. He was buried on 16 June 1285 in the choir of the Abbey, Kirkham et al. His bowels were buried at Belvoir, his heart a Croxton Abbey. He was mentioned at the Inquisition Post Mortem held in Yorkshire, on 3 August 1491 on the death of Sir Robert Ryther. Robert Ryther, knt. Writ wanting; inquisition 3 Aug 6 Hen.VII. He died seized of the under-mentioned moiety of the manor of Harwod in tail male, by the gift of Thomas Thwates, and William Barker, made by way of fine, with the King's licence, to one William Ryther, Knt, and Sibyl his wife, thereof, in tail male, with remainder in default to the right heirs, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Sibyl, viz., son of William, son of William their son.
He also died seized in tail male of the under-mentioned manor and advowson of Ryther, by virtue of the gift thereof made by John son of Robert Roos, by way of fine and with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Lucy, viz, son of William, son of William, son of William, son of Robert, son of Robert, son of Robert their son.
He died the last day of June last, seized of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee. Ralph Ryther, esq. aged 40 or more, is his brother and next heir.
York. A moiety in the manor of Harwod, in Harwod, Dunkyswyk and Helthwayt, worth 25l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.
Manor and advowson of the parish church of Ryther, in Ryther, Ossendak, and Stokbryge, worth 100 marks, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, as of the honour of Pontfrett, by service of 1/8 of a knight's fee.
Manor of Skarcroft, worth 10l., held of Henry Wavasour, knt., by the rent of a rose in the time of roses if required.
A moiety of the manor of Kyrkeby Overblowers, worth 4 marks, held of Henry, Earl of Northumberland, as of the manor of Spofford, by fealty, other services unknown.
Three messuages and 40 a. meadow and pasture in Kyrkeby on Wharffe, worth 40s, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, by fealty only
.

Children of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne

Robert de Ros Baron Ros of Werke

( - circa 1269)
     Robert de Ros Baron Ros of Werke was the son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland.
     He was hostage for his father, held by King John, 1206.
     Lord Robert de Ros, was a witness to the charter of Patrick, son of Patrick Earl of Dunbar dated at Roxburgh 3 Kal. April, 17 Alexander (30 March 1231).
     He was Chief Justice of King's Bench in 1234 and Chief Justice of the Forests North of Trent in 1236.
     Robert de Ros: Knight, of Wark on Tweed, Northumberland and Sanquhar, Nithsdale, second son. His lands evidently included the manor of Bellester (or Bellister) in Tynedale, originally part of the maritagium of his ancestress Isabel of Scotland. [cf. restoration of same to his descendant Gerard Salvayn]
Other children: William de Ros, of Downham
Isabel, m. 1) Sir Roger de Merlay; 2) Sir Adam de Everingham
Ida (->1315), m. 1) Sir Roger Bertram; 2) Sir Robert de Neville. Robert de Ros Baron Ros of Werke bore arms: Or three water bougets sable.
     Chris Phillips wrote in response to Douglas Richardson who recommended Hedley's Northumberland Families (1968), pp. 224-229: The problem is that there is that one piece of evidence cited by MichaelAnne - the IPM mentioning a Christiana as widow of "Robert de Ros, son of Robert de Ros of Werk" - which cannot be reconciled with Hedley's solution. There is also an associated entry on the fine roll (Cal. Fine Rolls i 32; cited by Complete Peerage) that says the same thing.
This is why several different reconstructions of the family have been published - one in Complete Peerage, which makes Christine Bertram the wife of Robert, the father of Robert the husband of Margaret, and another in History of Northumberland, which makes her the wife of Robert, the son of Robert and Margaret. Then there is Hedley, who makes her the wife of William, the brother of Robert the husband of Margaret.
The unfortunate thing is that Hedley doesn't comment on the problematic inquisition at all, so it's not clear whether he was even aware of the difficulty.
I think on the whole Hedley's solution does make most sense, and the references to a Christiana widow of Robert probably have to be set aside as an error. But it would be nice to have some definite proof that the Robert of this IPM was the husband of Margaret. The manor of Cargo later passed to Ros of Kendal, descendants of William, the younger son of Robert and Margaret, but it doesn't seem to be known how or when it first came to the family.
     Robert died circa 1269.

Child of Robert de Ros Baron Ros of Werke

Sir Robert de Ros Fursan

(1177 - before 23 December 1227)
     John Ravilious states: Of Helmsley in Holderness, co. York and Wark, Northumberland. He succeeded to the Trussebut inheritance of his mother, 1196 (answered for 500m. as the eldest coheir of Robert Trussebut, 1195- Sanders, p. 56[2]).
He was of the escort of William, King of Scots to court in England, Nov. 1200 and in 1209 Sheriff of Cumberland, 1213-1215[1]
' Robertus de Ros, ij milites ' - accounted for the service of 2 knights' fees in Northumberland, ca. 1201-1212 [Red Book of the Exchequer I: 179[3]]
Payment received from King John of England, at Carrickfergus, 25 July 1210:
' 477. Prests to knights at Carrickfergus the day of St. James the Apostle. Robert de Ros, 40 marks; the Earl of Winchester, 50 marks; Earl David, 30 marks, delivered to Bartholomew de Mortuo mari; David de Hastinges, 4 marks, for John his father; Eustace de Vescy, 30 marks; Henry son of Earl David, 2 marks (and many others). '
[Bain I:81[4], cites Prestita, 12 John, m. 5]
He subsequently served King John in Ireland, August 1210:
Sean Duffy wrote, re: King John and Baldwin, count of Aumale, in Ireland:
' Baldwin spent at least part of the summer of 1210 in Ireland. The praestita roll records payments made to Flemish knights at Dublin on
28 June and at Greenoge (in the barony of Ratoath, County Meath) two days later, at Carlingford on 11 July, Carrickfergus on 27 July, Drogheda on 9 August, and Fore (in County Westmeath) on 11 August.39 Within a week King John was back at Dublin, where substantial payments were again made to the Flemings in his service, including, on 19 August, to the count of Aumale himself . [Rot. liberate, p. 214. Baldwin's tenants Fulk and Lambert de Oyry and Robert de Ros received prests at Dublin on 21 August (ibid., p. 225). The `knights of the earl of Aubemarle' received further payments at Dublin two days later (ibid., p. 226). All told, at least thirty-three Flemish knights received prests during the expedition (Painter, King John, p. 265 n.130).] ' [Duffy[5]]

A similar letter to the following, written ' to Robert de Ros concerning the brother of Walter de Clifford '
[unidentified] a hostage of the King of Scotland placed with Robert for safekeeping, to be transferred to the King of England's custody, 13 June 1213 :
' 574. Concerning the K. of Scotland's hostages. The K. to S[aher] earl of Winchester. Commands him on receipt, immediately to send the K. by good and safe messengers, Reginald his own son, and the son of William de Veteripont, hostages of the K. of Scotland, who are in his custody by the K.'s order; so that they may be with the K. at Portsmouth on the vigil of St. John Baptist instant. Beaulieu. ' [Bain I:100-101[4], cites Foedera I:113; and Close Roll 15 John, p. 1, m. 4]

Surety for the Magna Carta, 1215; returned to allegiance to the King, November 1217

Confirmation made by Robert de Ros [II] to Meaux abbey of the gift in Warter made by Geoffrey Trussebut, his uncle, and of the land of Arras called Blanchemarle given by Geoffrey Dagon; also of the gifts of William son of Asketil in Warter, of Robert son of Osmund, of Walter de Boynton in Arnold, of Richer de Arnold of the site of the grange there, of Gilbert son of William de Dalton in Harlthorpe [par. Bubwith], of Osbert de Frismarais between Beeford and Nunkeeling, and of Simon Tuschet in Middleton on the Wolds. [1210-26] (Boynton, citing C T Clay, Early Yorkshire Charters, vol. X no. 92)[6]

2nd husband of Isabel 'of Scotland'
. Sir Robert de Ros Fursan was born in 1177 in Yorkshire. He was the son of Everard de Ros and Rose Trussebut.
     In 1191, aged fourteen, he paid a thousand marks fine for livery of his lands to King Richard I of England.
     Isabel Avenal of Scotland married secondly Sir Robert de Ros Fursan early in 1191 in Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland. She was the widow of Robert the Bruce and she brought the lands of Sanquhar to her second husband.
     He succeeded to the inheritance of his mother in 1196. (answered for 500m. as the eldest coheir of Robert Trussebut, 1195- Sanders, p. 56).
     Wikipedia states: In 1197, while serving King Richard in Normandy, he was arrested for an unspecified offence, and was committed to the custody of Hugh de Chaumont, but Chaumont entrusted his prisoner to William de Spiney, who allowed him to escape from the castle of Bonville. King Richard thereupon hanged Spiney and collected a fine of twelve hundred marks from Ros' guardian as the price of his continued freedom.
     Confirmation made by Robert de Ros [II] to Meaux abbey of the gift in Warter made by Geoffrey Trussebut, his uncle, and of the land of Arras called Blanchemarle given by Geoffrey Dagon; also of the gifts of William son of Asketil in Warter, of Robert son of Osmund, of Walter de Boynton in Arnold, of Richer de Arnold of the site of the grange there, of Gilbert son of William de Dalton in Harlthorpe (par. Bubwith), of Osbert de Frismarais between Beeford and Nunkeeling, and of Simon Tuschet in Middleton on the Wolds.1210-26.
     Payment received from King John of England, at Carrickfergus, 25 July 1210:
' 477. Prests to knights at Carrickfergus the day of St. James the Apostle. Robert de Ros, 40 marks; the Earl of Winchester, 50 marks; Earl David, 30 marks, delivered to Bartholomew de Mortuo mari; David de Hastinges, 4 marks, for John his father; Eustace de Vescy, 30 marks; Henry son of Earl David, 2 marks (and many others).' (Bain I:81, cites Prestita, 12 John, m. 5.
subsequently served King John in Ireland, August 1210:
Sean Duffy wrote, re: King John and Baldwin, count of Aumale, in Ireland:
' Baldwin spent at least part of the summer of 1210 in Ireland. The praestita roll records payments made to Flemish knights at Dublin on
28 June and at Greenoge (in the barony of Ratoath, County Meath) two days later, at Carlingford on 11 July, Carrickfergus on 27 July, Drogheda on 9 August, and Fore (in County Westmeath) on 11 August.39 Within a week King John was back at Dublin, where substantial payments were again made to the Flemings in his service, including, on 19 August, to the count of Aumale himself . Rot. liberate, p. 214.
Baldwin's tenants Fulk and Lambert de Oyry and Robert de Ros received prests at Dublin on 21 August (ibid., p. 225). The `knights of the earl of Aubemarle' received further payments at Dublin two days later (ibid., p. 226). All told, at least thirty-three Flemish knights received prests during the expedition (Painter, King John, p. 265 n.130).'
.
     Robert died before 23 December 1227 in London. He was buried on 23 December 1227 in New Temple church, London.

Children of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland

Thomas de Ros 10th Baron

(9 September 1427 - 17 May 1464)
     Thomas de Ros 10th Baron was born on 9 September 1427. He was the eldest son of Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros and Eleanor Beauchamp. His mother was daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and his first wife Elizabeth Berkeley. Eleanor was an older half-sister of Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick and Anne Neville, Countess of Warwick.
Thomas himself was an older maternal half-brother to Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset and Edmund Beaufort, 4th Duke of Somerset.
As a loyal supporter of King Henry VI of England, de Ros was attainted in Parliament on November 4, 1461. He was later beheaded at Newcastle for treason, and the Ros lands were confiscated. Belvoir Castle was given to Lord Hastings.
In February 1461, he had been one of the knights made at the second Battle of St Albans by Edward of Westminster, Prince of Wales. Thomas had inherited the barony of de Ros when he was barely four years old. His great uncle, Sir Robert Ros, knight, was deputed to perform the office of chamberlain to Archbishop Stafford, on the day of his installation at Canterbury; this office belonged to the Lord Ros, from his tenure of the manor of Hethfield, in Kent. The fee for this service was the furniture of the room, and the basin and towel. The manor, and tenure on which it was held, came to the Ros family, from the marriage of an ancestor with Margaret Badlesmere.
Thomas Lord Ros was only eighteen years of age when put by the king into full possession of his father's estates. Having been faithful to Henry VI throughout his reign, he was rewarded with certain commercial privileges, consisting, chiefly, in an entire remission of the customary duties on exported wool. In 1456, he had permission to go on a pilgrimage, and in 1460, the king settled on him, as in part, a recompense for the expenses and losses incurred in his service, an annuity of £40, arising out of certain manors forfeited by the Earl of Salisbury. In the same year, being with king at York when news arrived of the Lancastrian defeat at the Battle of Towton, he accompanied Henry to Berwick.
Thomas was married to Philippa de Tibetot, the sister of John Tiptoft, 1st Earl of Worcester. Their children were:
John de Ros
Edmund de Ros, 11th Baron de Ros
Eleanor de Ros
Isabel de Ros
Joan de Ros
Margaret de Ros. He was the son of Thomas de Ros 9th Baron.
     Thomas died on 17 May 1464 aged 36.

Children of Thomas de Ros 10th Baron

Thomas de Ros 5th Baron

(1338 - 8 June 1383)
     Thomas de Ros 5th Baron was born in 1338. He married Beatrice Stafford, daughter of the earl of Stafford, and she brought him the manor of Braunston in her dowry. Their children were: John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros
William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros
Sir Thomas de Ros
Margaret de Ros, married Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn
Elizabeth de Ros
In 1364, he accompanied the king of Cyprus to the Holy Land; and was in the French wars, from 1369 to 1371. He was summoned to parliament by both King Edward III of England and King Richard II of England.
His widow became the wife of Sir Richard Burley. He was the son of William de Ros 3rd Baron.
     Thomas died on 8 June 1383 in Uffington, Sal/Brk/Lin. He was buried after 8 June 1383 in Rivaulx Abbey, Yorkshire.

Children of Thomas de Ros 5th Baron

Thomas de Ros 9th Baron

(26 September 1406 - 18 August 1430)
     Thomas de Ros 9th Baron was born on 26 September 1406. He was the second son of William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros and Margaret Fitzalan. His mother was a daughter of John Fitzalan and Eleanor Maltravers. He was also a younger brother of John de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros.
His older brother died childless in the Battle of Beaugé of 1421. Thomas inherited his rank and privileges. He followed the example of his brother in participating in the Hundred Years' War. He fought in the Battle of Verneuil under the successful command of John, Duke of Bedford. He was honored for his efforts, knighted by Henry VI of England on May 19, 1426. Henry was nephew of the Duke.
Thomas resumed service under the Duke in 1427. He was summoned to the Parliament of England in 1429. He fell into the Seine during a minor skirmish and drowned in 1430.
He was married to Eleanor Beauchamp, daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and his first wife Elizabeth Berkeley. Eleanor was an older half-sister of Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick and Anne Neville, Countess of Warwick. They were parents of three children:
Thomas de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (September 9, 1427 - May 17, 1464).
Richard de Ros (March 8, 1429 - after 1492).
Margaret de Ros (1432 - December 10, 1488). Married first William Botreaux, 3rd Baron Bocastle, secondly Thomas Borough, 1st Baron Borough of Gainsborough.
His widow was remarried to Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset. He was the son of William de Ros 7th Baron.
     Thomas died on 18 August 1430 aged 23.

Child of Thomas de Ros 9th Baron

William de Ros

( - 1310)
     William de Ros was the son of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
     William de Ros married Isabel de Steeton. She was the daughter of Richard de Steeton.
     William died in 1310 in Yorkshire.

Sir William de Ros

(circa 1192 - 1264)
     Sir William de Ros was born circa 1192 in England. Generations missing here - needs more work!!. He was the son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland.
     Sir William de Ros married Lucy FitzPiers, daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references.
     He paid homage for his inheritance 23 Dec 1226; he was included with his father in the special bull of excommunication Jan 1215/6, and remained an active partisan of Prince Louis till the final battle of Lincoln 19 May 1217, in which he was captured; he paid 20 marks to be delivered from prison, and was handed over to his father in Oct 1217. In May 1224 he was sent to Poitou in the King's service, and in August took part in the siege of Bedford Castle. He witnessed the promulgation of the Forest charter Feb 1224/5 and accompanied Henry in his expedition to France 1230.

SIR WILLIAM DE Ros, S. and h., did homage for his inheritance as above; he was included with his father in the special Bull of excommunication, Jan. 1215/6, and remained an active partisan of Prince Louis till the final battle of Lincoln, in May 1217, in which he was captured; he paid 20 marks to be delivered from prison, and was handed over to his father in Oct. 12 1 7.(g) In May 1224 he was sent to Poitou in the King's service and in Aug. took part in the siege of Bedford Castle.(a) He witnessed the promulgation of the Fore charter, Feb. 1224/5, and accompanied Henry in his expedition to France, 1230.(b) In Jan. In 1235/6 he attested the confirmation of Magna Carta at Westminster, and in 1237 was of the escort of the King of Scots to his meeting with Henry at York, attesting the agreement, between the two Kings.(c) In 1242-43 his lands were seized for his failure to attend, with his peers, the muster at Rhuddlan, Aug 1241, and the King's expedition to France, May I242. (d) In 124-. he witnessed King Alexander's letter to the Pope.(e) He went on pilgrimage to Santiago in 1262; was sum., with his son Robert, for service in Scotland, I2S7/8; for service against the Welsh, 1258 and later; to London, with all his service due, 1260 and 1261; in Mar 1263/4, for service in Wales, with attendance first at a Council a Oxford.(f) He seems to have taken no part in the Barons' War, and was reputed to be loyal.(g) He m. Lucy.(h) He died, probably, in 1264, and was buried at Kirkham.(i) His widow was living in Mich. term, 1266.(j)
(g) Gervase of Cant., Chron., Rolls Ser., vol. ii, p. i i i ; Pipe Roll, 2 Hen. III, WiltS; Patent Rolls, 12 16-25, P. i o6.
(a) Idem, PP. 441, 465.
(b) Statutes of the Realm, vol. i, p. 27; Patent Ro11s, 1225-32, P. 359; C10 Rolls, 1227-31, P. 413.
(c) Statutes of the Realm, vol. i, p. 28; Close RollS, 1234-37, P. 56o; Farder, vol. iy P. 234.
(d) Close Rolls, 1237-42, P. 453; 1242-473 P. 91; 1251-53, P. 498; M. Pari, op. cit., vol. iV, Pp. 228, 23o. A list of the fees held b him at this time is in Book of Fees, pp. 1099, 1120.
(e). Paris, op. cit., vol. iv, P.'383.
(f) Cal. Patent Rolls, 1247-58, P. 133; Close Roll$, 1256-59, pp. 2901, 299 1259-61, pp. 158, 498; 126164, PP. 303, 378.
(g) Idem, 126 1 -64, P. 37 0.
(h) Rievaulx Chartulary, P. 36o. She is said by Dugdale (Baronage, vol, i, p. 54.7), citing Glover, Somerset Herald, to have been daughter of "Reginald Fitz-piers of Blewlebeny in Wales." If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert FitzPiers and of his br. and h. Reynold FitzPiers, and da. of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was at Blaenllyfni. Piers FitzHerbert m. in 1203, his son Reynold not till 1249 (Curia Regis Rolls, vol. iii, p. 6; Close Rolls, 1247-51, p. 200).
(i) Rievaulx Chartulary, P. 36o. He had yr. sons, William (see Ros of Ingmanthorpe), Alexander, Herbert and John, Knights, and Piers, and daughters Lucy, who married Robert, s. of Robert de Plumton, and Alice, who m. Sir John Comyn, lord of Badenoch (Yorks Deeds, Yorks Arch. Soc., vol. v, no. 273; Gervase of Cant., Chron., vol. ii, p. 234; Gray's Register, p. 50 note; Cal. Patent Rolls, 1258-66, P. 334; Close Rolls, 1259-61, p. 478; Hist. MSS. Com., Rutland Papers, Vol. iv, P. 84; Lines. N. and Q., vol. iX, p. 250, citing De Banco Roll, Mich. 9 Edw. 111, m. 353, and Harl. Chr., 48 G. 37; Cal. Charter Rolls, vol. ii, p. 124; Gen. Harrison's Indexes (P.R.O.), citing De Banco Roll, Easter 6 Edw III, mm. 171,295). He was a benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx and Meaux, and of the Templars (Lancaster, Bridlington Chartulary, P. 232; Cal. Charter Rolls, vol. i, p. 146; Chroff. de Melsa, Rolls Ser., vol ii, P. 34; Yorks -4reh. 7journal, vol. vii, p. 441).
     He occupied Helmsley Castle from 1227 to 1258 without much altering his father's buildings, though he did build a new chapel which was consecrated in 1246. This replaced a chapel in the east tower.
     In Jan 1235/6 he attested the confirmation of Magna Carta at Westminster, and in 1237 was of the escort of the King of Scots to his meeting with Henry at York, attesting the agreement between the two Kings.
     In 1242-43 his lands were seized for this failure to attend, with his peers, the muster at Rhuddland, Aug 1241, and the King's expedition to France, May 1242. In 124? he witnessed King Alexander's letter to the Pope.
     He went on pilgrimage to Santiago in 1252; was summoned with his son Robert, for service in Scotland 1257/8; for service against the Welsh 1258 and later; to London, with all his service due 1260 & 1261; in Mar 1263/4 for service in Wales, with attendance first at a Council at Oxford. He seems to have taken no part in the Baron's War, and was reputed to be loyal. He was a benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx & Meaux and of the Templars. Sir William de Ros was buried in 1264 in the choir before the altar, Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, Yorkshire.
     William died in 1264 in Helmsley, Yorkshire. He probably died in 1264, and was buried at Kirkham. His widow was living in Mich. term 1266. He was a benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx & Meaux and of the Templars.

Children of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers

Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)

( - before 28 May 1310)
     Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) was born in England. ...presumably 3rd son of Sir William (son of Robert) de Ros of Helmsley, who d. c1264...
married Eustache FitzHugh, widow of Nicholas de Cauntelo, a footnote (h) on p. 118:
"...Eustache d. in his lifetime. He left a younger son Thomas...and several
daughters: Margaret..., Mary..., and apparently Lucy, wife of Sir Robert de Plumpton (Yorks. Deeds, Yorks Rec. Ser., vol. v, no. 273), who had a da.
named Eustache(Idem, no. 306)...". He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
     He was of Ingmanthorpe. Served in Scotland 1257-8 and in Gascony 1294.
     Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) married Eustace Fitzralph. She was the daughter of Ralph FitzHugh, widow of Nicholas de Cauntelo/Cantilupe.
     William died before 28 May 1310 in Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire. He was buried on 28 May 1310 in Grey Friars church, Yorkshire.

Children of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph