Norman William Ronalds

(15 November 1939 - 27 May 1957)
     Norman William Ronalds was born on 15 November 1939 in Victoria, Australia. He was the son of Maurice Ronalds and Edith Victoria Murphy.
     Norman died on 27 May 1957 aged 17.

Mary Ronane

     Mary Ronane and Michael Colbert obtained a marriage licence in 1809 in Cork, Ireland.

Laurent Rondolin

(circa 1884 - )
     Laurent Rondolin was born circa 1884.
The marriage of Laurent Rondolin and Mabel Florence Martin, daughter of Robert Sigsworth Martin and Sarah Griffin, was registered in St Olave Bermondsey RD, Surrey, in the March 1913 quarter. They co-habited before 1911. After her death he re-married Nellie Gertrude Horwood in the Lewisham district of Kent in 1916 and had a daughter Pauline Joan..

Child of Laurent Rondolin and Mabel Florence Martin

Ruby Josephine Rondolin

(19 March 1914 - March 1983)
     Ruby Josephine Rondolin's birth was registered in the quarter ending on 19 March 1914 in Bermondsey RD, Surrey. She was the daughter of Laurent Rondolin and Mabel Florence Martin.
     Ruby's death was registered in the quarter ending in March 1983 in Bromley RD, Kent.

Daniel Rooke

     Daniel Rooke and Sarah Ludlam obtained a marriage licence on 4 February 1691 in Yorkshire. They were both of Barnsley and the marriage was to take place at Silkstone PC or Darton PC or Barnsley Chapel.

Ellen Olivia Rooke

     Ellen Olivia Rooke married William Domville Handcock, son of William Elias Handcock and Margaret Phillips, on 5 June 1862 in St Stephen's, Waterford, Waterford. On the 5th inst at St Stephen's church, Mount St, by the Rev John Pim, cousin to the bride, William Domville, eldest on of William Elias Handcock, Sallypark, co. Dublin, Esq, to Ellen Olivia,eldes and only surviving daughter of the late Major Rooke, 13th Regt, Madras Army..

Edward Rookes (Leeds)

(1713 - 1788)
     Edward Rookes (Leeds) was born in 1713. He was the son of William Rookes and Mary Rodes.
Edward Rookes (Leeds) married Mary Leeds in 1740.
     Edward died in 1788 in Wibsey, Yorkshire.

Child of Edward Rookes (Leeds) and Mary Leeds

John Rookes Esq

     John Rookes Esq married Unknown daughter Ryther, daughter of Sir Ralph Ryther and Maude or Matilda Percy.

William Rookes

     William Rookes married Mary Rodes, daughter of William Rodes and Mary Wilson, on 27 January 1712/13.

Child of William Rookes and Mary Rodes

Alexander de Ros

     Alexander de Ros was the son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland.

Sir Alexander de Ros

     Sir Alexander de Ros was born in England. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
Sir Alexander de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Lucy de Ros and Sir John de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280.

Alice de Ros

( - 29 April 1286)
     Alice de Ros was the daughter of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
Alice de Ros married Sir John Comyn. She was his second wife and they had a son John of Ulceby, Lincs. Her father had granted her free warren in Ulceby. She married secondly Sir James Byron about 1277.
     Alice died on 29 April 1286.

Alice de Ros

     Alice de Ros was born in Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
Alice de Ros married Geoffrey St Quintin.

Avelina de Ros

     Avelina de Ros married Sir John Bohun (of Midhurst). Avelina de Ros was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.

Edmund de Ros 11th Baron

(1446 - 13 October 1508)
     Edmund de Ros 11th Baron was born in 1446. He was a follower of the House of Lancaster during the Wars of the Roses, and regained his family title after the accession of King Henry VII of England.
As a result of his father's attainder, he went into exile. Under Henry VII, who united the houses of York and Lancaster, the attainder was reversed; and Edmund, Lord Ros, was reinstated in his ancestral property; Belvoir had been in the possession of the Hastings family for more than twenty years. In the petition to parliament, presented by Lord Ros, November, 1483, his claims are stated with great moderation, and his sufferings for his loyalty to King Henry VI are not overstated.
About nine years later, Sir Thomas Lovel, who married Isabel, Edmund's sister, presented a petition to parliament, stating that Edmund was "not of sufficient discretion to guide himself and his livelihood; nor able to serve his sovereign after his duty" and asking "that he might have the guidance and governance of the said Edmund" and all his property. An act of parliament was passed, giving full powers to Sir Thomas Lovel over the person and property of Lord Ros, and entire possession of the latter at is death; upon trust for the other relatives of Lord Ros, reserving only a rent of seven hundred marks to the king, and the right, title, and interest of those who have, or ought to have, possession or occupation of certain portions of the property.
Edmund, Lord Ros, lived at the manor of Elsinges, at Enfield, which he had inherited from his mother, and was probably kept under restraint. On his death, and was buried in the church at Enfield, on the north side of the altar; where his monument is an arch, erected over the tomb of Lady Joyce Tiploft, his maternal grandmother, and charged with the arms of Ros quartering Badlesmere. Since Edmund had no children, his sisters were his heirs; and Elsinges became the property of his brother in law, Sir Thomas Lovel, who, at his death, in 1524, bequeathed it to his great-nephew, Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, in 1526. Eleanor, the eldest sister and co-heir of Edmund, Lord Ros, married Sir Robert Manners, of Ethale, in the county of Northumberland. Eleanor was therefore the grandmother of Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland. He was the son of Thomas de Ros 10th Baron.
     Edmund died on 13 October 1508.

Eleanor de Ros

     Eleanor de Ros was the daughter of Thomas de Ros 10th Baron.
Eleanor de Ros married Sir Robert Manners.
Eleanor de Ros married Sir Robert Manners.

Children of Eleanor de Ros and Sir Robert Manners

Everard de Ros

(circa 1144 - 1183)
      Lord of Helmsley. Benefactor of the abbeys of Newminster & Rievaulx.
Everard de Ros, son and heir,(i) was still a minor in 1166.(j) He adhered to the King in the rebellion of 1173.(k) He m. Roese, 1st sister and coh., in her issue sole heir, of Robert, and da. of William, TRUSSEBUT, lord of Warter, E.R. Yorks, by Aubreye de HARCOURT.(l) He d. in 1183, before Mich.(m) His widow was said to be aged 34 in 1185, and to have two sons, the elder aged 13.(n) She was living in the summer of 1194 and d. before Mich. 1196
. Everard de Ros was born circa 1144. He was still a minor in 1166. He was in wardship to Ranulph de Glanvil. He was the son of Robert de Ros and Sibyl de Valognes.
Everard de Ros married Rose Trussebut, daughter of William Trussebut Lord of Warter and Aubrey de Harcourt.
In 1176 he paid the then large sum of five hundred and twenty-six pounds as a fine for his lands, and other large amounts subsequently.
     Everard died in 1183.

Children of Everard de Ros and Rose Trussebut

Everard de Ros

(before 1109 - circa 1153)
     Everard de Ros was born before 1109. Everard de Ros, s. and h.,(g) was of age in 1130, when he rendered account for 2 marks of gold that he might no longer be steward of William de Aumale.(h). He was the son of Piers or Peter de Ros and Adeline Espec.
He confirmed (1138-40) the church of Atwick to Bridlington Priory, for the soul of Eustache, his wife, and, somewhat later, notified his br. Robert and others that he had quitclaimed land to Whitby Abbey.(i)
In I144-46 he attested, with his overlord William, Count of Aumale, the Archbishop's charter to Beverley.Q) He m. Eustache (see above). He d. in or before 1153.
(g) See note "h" below. Archbishop Thurstan confirmed (circa 1130-33) the church of Atwick to Bridlington Priory, with consent of Everard, s. of Piers (Ear Yorks Charters, vol. iii, p. 82).
(h) Pipe Roll, 31 Hen. I, P. 32.
(i) Early Yorks Charters, vol. iii, p. 52; Lancaster, Bridlington Chartulary pp. 312, 430; Whithy Chartulary, Surtees Soc., vol. i, no. 248.
(j) Early Yorks Charters, vol. i, p. 101.
(k) See follg. note.
He is mentioned in his brother's charter to Rievaulx..
     Everard died circa 1153.

Sir Herbert de Ros

     Sir Herbert de Ros was born in England. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.

Isabel de Ros

(circa 1244 - 12 June 1356)
     Isabel de Ros was born circa 1244. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
Isabel de Ros married Walter de Fauconberg 2nd Baron.
     Isabel died on 12 June 1356.

Isabel de Ros

     Isabel de Ros was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
Isabel de Ros married Marmaduke Thwenge circa 1278.

Ivette de Ros

( - before 1331)
     Ivette de Ros was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
Ivette de Ros married Geoffrey le Scrope (Lord of Masham).
     Ivette died before 1331. She was buried in Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire.

Child of Ivette de Ros and Geoffrey le Scrope (Lord of Masham)

Joan de Ros

(circa 1252 - 13 October 1348)
     Joan de Ros was born circa 1252. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
     Joan died on 13 October 1348. She married John Lovell, 1st Baron Lovell of Tichmarch.

John de Ros

(1386 - 1421)
     John de Ros was born in 1386. He was the eldest son of William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros and Margaret Fitzalan. His mother was a daughter of John Fitzalan and Eleanor Maltravers.
He served as a soldier of Henry V of England during the Hundred Years' War. Six years after the Battle of Agincourt, John participated in the Battle of Baugé. He was among the casualties along with his brother William de Ros, Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, the governor of Normandy and others. He was buried at the Belvoir Priory.
He was married to Margaret Despencer but no children are known to have resulted from this marriage. He was the son of William de Ros 7th Baron.
     John died in 1421.

Sir John de Ros

      This John is probably the father of Lucy Audley/Ryther, not the son of Robert as stated in "Complete Peerage". Sir John de Ros was born in Yorkshire. He was the son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
Sir John de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Lucy de Ros and Sir Alexander de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280. There is speculation that Lucy's reputed father John was really her brother and both were siblings of Robert her reputed grandfather.

John de Ros 6th Baron

(1365 - 1394)
     John de Ros 6th Baron was born in 1365. He was the son of Thomas de Ros 5th Baron.
     John died in 1394 in Pathos, Cyprus.

John de Ros Bishop of Carlisle

( - 1332)
     John de Ros Bishop of Carlisle was the son of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
John Ravilious wrote on the Medieval Mailing list: The statement in the IPM of 1491 identifying John de Ros as 'son of Robert Roos' appears to be in error. In a prior post, I noted that John de Ros may well have been the brother, not the son of Sir Robert de Ros (d. 1285). Two reasons support that suggestion:
1. The fine dated 1280 provides for reversion of the manors to John de Ros, 'with remainders to Alexander, John's brother...' Sir Robert de Ros (d. 1285) had no known son Alexander; however, he did have younger brothers John and Alexander, the latter of whom was identified in a charter of Sir Robert, enfeoffing Thomas de Werke, chaplain, in certain lands in Helmsley, dated 1264x1285. This charter was witnessed by his brothers Sir Peter, Sir William, Sir Alexander and Sir Herbert ("Hiis testibus: Dominis Petro de Ros, Willelmo de Ros, Alexandro de Ros, Herberto de Ros, militibus et fratribus..")[3]
2. The chronology of the generations does not readily support the filiation in the 1491 IPM (and in CP XI:8). Sir William de Ros, eldest son and heir of Sir Robert, was born 1255 or before (he was aged 30 and more at his father's death), and his mother Isabel de Aubigny was born ca. 1233. It is not reasonable to place Lucy de Ros, widow of Henry de Audley b. 1251, d. 1276 or before) and married 2ndly in 1280 or before to William de Ryther, as the daughter of a man (son of Sir Robert de Ros and Isabel de Aubigny) who would himself likely have been born 1255 or later, and very possibly after 1260.
If in fact Lucy was the daughter of John de Ros, he was therefore certainly the brother, not son, of Sir Robert. Lucy his daughter would therefore have been the namesake of her paternal grandmother, Lucy (daughter of Piers fitz Herbert of Blaen Llyfni).
The identification of Lucy, wife of (1) Henry de Audley and (2) Sir William de Ryther as daughter of John de Ros is not proven, but is probable based on the evidence in hand. The entail of Gildehusdale and the other lands on 'the heirs of Lucy's body', with reversion to John de Ros and remainder to his brother Alexander, is indicative of a family transaction
.
Fine dated 1280: 28. York. Morrow of Hil. 8 Edw I. Before the same. Between John, son of Robert de Ros of Hamelak, quer., and William de Rither, deforc. [seller], of the manors of Rither, Schardecroft, Gyldhusum' and the advowson of Rither church. Covenant. John's right as of William's gift. John and his heirs to hold of the chief lords. William and his heirs to warrant. For a sore sparrowhawk.
This feoffment was the first stage of a settlement. The second fine as given by John took place very soon after, on February 2 1280.
54. York. Morrow of Cand. Before the same. Between William de Ryther, quer., and John de Ros, deforc., [seller] of the manors of Ryther, Scarthecroft and Gildehus' with the advowson of Ryther church. Covenant. John's right. William and Lucy his wife and the heirs of Lucy's body to hold of the chief lords with remainder to William and reversion after William's death to John and the heirs of his body with remainders to Alexander, John's brother, and the heirs of his body and to William's next heirs.

Rosie Bevan wrote: The two fines had a threefold purpose - feoffment, marriage jointure, and protection against wardship of the lands in case of a minority.
That Gildersdale was of the fee of Ros at the time of the settlement, there is no question - it is listed in Feudal Aids with Robert's holding as chief lord given in the past tense, meaning its tenure was recorded just after his decease in 1285. Its two carucates had descended to the Ros family via the Trussebuts, with William de Ros inheriting it on the death of his aunt Agatha in 1247. It is possible that John had been enfeoffed in this manor, but there are indications that Rithers were tenants long before it passed into Ros posession, and the marriage settlement shows that it was unlikely to have been Lucy's maritagium.
The settlement of the Ryther lands on Lucy and her issue is characteristic of a jointure, an increasingly preferred method of marrying off daughters without reducing the family estate by the end of the thirteenth century. A sum of money passed hands as the bride's marriage portion, and in return there was a settlement of the groom's lands on her for life. The jointure also protected the issue of the marriage from claims by other children of the husband from earlier or later marriages. Most importantly if the husband died leaving a widow and underage children, the lord did not have wardship of that land.
John de Ros must have been related to Lucy in some way. Usually the principals of a marriage jointure were the father or brother providing dowry, but in this case it is possible that being a secondary marriage it was only a small one, and with Lucy's youth, William Rither was more interested in her Audley dower.
Chronology goes against Lucy being daughter of John, but she may certainly have been a younger daughter of Robert de Ros and Isabel D'Aubigny who were married around 1244. We would expect them to have had a daughter called Lucy, named after Robert's mother. At a guess it is possible that John and Alexander were clerics and did not expect to leave heirs. The reversion to them on the death of William in the event of lack of heirs would represent a refund of the marriage portion, with the lands ultimately passing to William's right heirs after their death.
As it happens, the Ryther lands did pass down William's direct line, so the fine clearly served its primary intent. Notably, while Scarcroft and Ryther descended with his heirs, there is no mention of Gildersdale in the 1491 inquisition for Robert Ryther, so it appears to have passed out of the family in the intervening 211 years
.
A record of a deed done during his mother's lifetime, before 15 June 1301:
[Late 13th cent.] - Deed of feoffment by Richard, the clerk, son of Philip de Beuver to John son of Sir Robert de Ros, of a toft and croft, with appurtenances, within and without the vill of Beuver, lying between the king's (high) way and the land of William the miller, and formerly held by Alice le Rede, to be held of the lady Isabel de Ros and
her heirs by the due and accustomed services.
Hiis testibus: Johanne Wade de Botlisford tunc ballivo de Beuver; Rogero Wade de Botlisford; Roberto Basset de Wlstorp; Galfrido Kingesheie de Beuver; Roberto pistore de eadem. Pointed oval seal of Richard.
     John died in 1332. He was mentioned at the Inquisition Post Mortem held in Yorkshire on 3 August 1491 on the death of Sir Robert Ryther. Robert Ryther, knt. Writ wanting; inquisition 3 Aug 6 Hen.VII. He died seized of the under-mentioned moiety of the manor of Harwod in tail male, by the gift of Thomas Thwates, and William Barker, made by way of fine, with the King's licence, to one William Ryther, Knt, and Sibyl his wife, thereof, in tail male, with remainder in default to the right heirs, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Sibyl, viz., son of William, son of William their son.
He also died seized in tail male of the under-mentioned manor and advowson of Ryther, by virtue of the gift thereof made by John son of Robert Roos, by way of fine and with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Lucy, viz, son of William, son of William, son of William, son of Robert, son of Robert, son of Robert their son.
He died the last day of June last, seized of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee. Ralph Ryther, esq. aged 40 or more, is his brother and next heir.
York. A moiety in the manor of Harwod, in Harwod, Dunkyswyk and Helthwayt, worth 25l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.
Manor and advowson of the parish church of Ryther, in Ryther, Ossendak, and Stokbryge, worth 100 marks, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, as of the honour of Pontfrett, by service of 1/8 of a knight's fee.
Manor of Skarcroft, worth 10l., held of Henry Wavasour, knt., by the rent of a rose in the time of roses if required.
A moiety of the manor of Kyrkeby Overblowers, worth 4 marks, held of Henry, Earl of Northumberland, as of the manor of Spofford, by fealty, other services unknown.
Three messuages and 40 a. meadow and pasture in Kyrkeby on Wharffe, worth 40s, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, by fealty only
.

Lucy de Ros

(circa 1270 - )
     Lucy de Ros was born circa 1270 in Helmsley, Yorkshire. Complete Peerage states, after a correction in Vol XIV, that Lucy was 'da. of John de Ros, son of Robert de Ros of Helmsley'. They cite (a) Exch Inq p.m. 170/7 and (b) Gen Plantagenet Harrison's Notes which cited De Banco Rolls, 21 Hen VI, m. 128 d, where her portion is said to have been the manor of Gildhusdale, which was of the fee of Ros in 1284 (Book of Fees, vol vi.p. 50).. She was the daughter of Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron and Isabel D'Aubigne.
Lucy de Ros married Henry Audley. Lucy de Ros was widowed before 22 April 1276 on the death of her husband Henry Audley.
Lucy de Ros married Sir William Ryther as her second husband, circa 1280. He married, in or before 1280 Lucy, ?daughter of John de Ros, son of Robert, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley. At the Inquisition Post Mortem for Robert Ryther (6 Hen VII) it is mentioned that he held the manor & advowson of Ryther, by virtue of gift made by John, son of Robert Roos, by way of fine & with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William ....
Lucy de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Sir John de Ros and Sir Alexander de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280. There is debate whether her reported father John (son of Robert) was really her brother along with Robert.
Staff. and Salop. William de Ryther and Lucy his wife sued William de Audidelegh for a third of the manor of Helley (Heleigh), Dymmesdale, and Boteresdon, and for a third of the passagium of Wrimestrete, and of the advowson of Audelegh; for a third of the manors of Betteley, Dunestall, and of the vills of Borewardeslyme (Burslem), Talk, Knotton, and Thurfeld, and for a third of a rent of 20s. and of a dozen knives (cutellorum), and of half a pound of cumin in Newcastle-under-Lyme, one-third of a water mill in Chaveldon, a third of 10s. rent in Ruston, a third of 2s. rent in Ridierd, a third of 12s. rent in Stanle in co. Stafford, and a third of the vill of Forde, and of two parts of Marchumley, Weston, Redcastle, Kentenesdon, Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, and of a third of 10s. rent in Moston in co. Salop as her dower, of the gift of Henry de Audidelegh her first husband.
William appeared and stated he only held a virgate of land in Dymmesdale, and 6d. rent in Boteresdon, and a bovate of land in Knotton, and that Ela the widow of James de Audelegh held a mark of rent in Newcastleunder-Lyme, and she also held a third of his tenements in Riston (Rushton), Ridiert, Stanle, Wymerstrete, and Audelegh and Moston; and in Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, he only held the services of John de Lakne, Robert de Wykeshull, and William de Haukeston; and this was the whole of his tenure when Lucy sued out her writ, viz., on 2nd November, 8 E. I., and he appealed to a jury, and William de Rither and Lucy likewise. The Sheriff is ordered to summon a jury for five weeks from Easter. m. 49, dorso
.
Record of a suit against her brother-in-law William de Audley, 2 Nov 1281: Staff. and Salop. William de Ryther and Lucy his wife sued William de Audidelegh for a third of the manor of Helley (Heleigh), Dymmesdale, and Boteresdon, and for a third of the passagium of Wrimestrete, and of the advowson of Audelegh; for a third of the manors of Betteley, Dunestall, and of the vills of Borewardeslyme (Burslem), Talk, Knotton, and Thurfeld, and for a third of a rent of 20s. and of a dozen knives (cutellorum), and of half a pound of cumin in Newcastle-under-Lyme, one-third of a water mill in Chaveldon, a third of 10s. rent in Ruston, a third of 2s. rent in Ridierd, a third of 12s. rent in Stanle in co. Stafford, and a third of the vill of Forde, and of two parts of Marchumley, Weston, Redcastle, Kentenesdon, Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, and of a third of 10s. rent in Moston in co. Salop as her dower, of the gift of Henry de Audidelegh her first husband.
William appeared and stated he only held a virgate of land in Dymmesdale, and 6d. rent in Boteresdon, and a bovate of land in Knotton, and that Ela the widow of James de Audelegh held a mark of rent in Newcastle-under-Lyme, and she also held a third of his tenements in Riston (Rushton), Ridiert, Stanle, Wymerstrete, and Audelegh and Moston; and in Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, he only held the services of John de Lakne, Robert de Wykeshull, and William de Haukeston; and this was the whole of his tenure when Lucy sued out her writ, viz., on 2nd November, 8 E. I., and he appealed to a jury, and William de Rither and Lucy likewise.
The Sheriff is ordered to summon a jury for five weeks from Easter. m. 49, dorso
.
A Chancery document dated 20 Nov 1293 (22 Edw I) for William de Rither and Lucy his wife grants land in Ryther to the Master and brethren of St Nicholas in York in exchange for land there, retaining the manor of Ryther.
In 30 Jan 1293/4, she was the subject of an inquisition ad quod damnum with her husband William de Ryther and the hospital of St. Nicholas York. A licence for the above was granted 3 Jul 1294.
In March 1311/2 she was bequeathed a gold ring by William le Vavasour. Lucy de Ros was mentioned at the Inquisition Post Mortem held in Yorkshire on 3 August 1491 on the death of Sir Robert Ryther. Robert Ryther, knt. Writ wanting; inquisition 3 Aug 6 Hen.VII. He died seized of the under-mentioned moiety of the manor of Harwod in tail male, by the gift of Thomas Thwates, and William Barker, made by way of fine, with the King's licence, to one William Ryther, Knt, and Sibyl his wife, thereof, in tail male, with remainder in default to the right heirs, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Sibyl, viz., son of William, son of William their son.
He also died seized in tail male of the under-mentioned manor and advowson of Ryther, by virtue of the gift thereof made by John son of Robert Roos, by way of fine and with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William, he being cousin and heir male of the said William and Lucy, viz, son of William, son of William, son of William, son of Robert, son of Robert, son of Robert their son.
He died the last day of June last, seized of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee. Ralph Ryther, esq. aged 40 or more, is his brother and next heir.
York. A moiety in the manor of Harwod, in Harwod, Dunkyswyk and Helthwayt, worth 25l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.
Manor and advowson of the parish church of Ryther, in Ryther, Ossendak, and Stokbryge, worth 100 marks, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, as of the honour of Pontfrett, by service of 1/8 of a knight's fee.
Manor of Skarcroft, worth 10l., held of Henry Wavasour, knt., by the rent of a rose in the time of roses if required.
A moiety of the manor of Kyrkeby Overblowers, worth 4 marks, held of Henry, Earl of Northumberland, as of the manor of Spofford, by fealty, other services unknown.
Three messuages and 40 a. meadow and pasture in Kyrkeby on Wharffe, worth 40s, held of the King, as of the duchy of Lancaster, by fealty only
.

Children of Lucy de Ros and Sir William Ryther

Lucy de Ros

(before 1280 - )
     Lucy de Ros was born before 1280. She was the daughter of Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe) and Eustace Fitzralph.
Lucy de Ros married Sir? Robert de Plumpton.

Lucy de Ros

(say 1230 - after 1279)
     Lucy de Ros was born say 1230. She was the daughter of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPiers.
Lucy de Ros married William de Kyme circa 1247. Lucy de Ros was widowed before 3 September 1259 on the death of her husband William de Kyme.
She was still been living in Easter Term, 1275, when she was summoned to answer Ralph de Normanville in a plea.
     Lucy died after 1279. She was buried in Grey Friars church, York.
Lucy de Ros and Lucy de Ros, Sir John de Ros and Sir Alexander de Ros were mentioned on 14 January 1280. If Lucy is the sister of John & Alexander, she is probably the Lucy who married William Kyme. However the dating is unlikely.

Child of Lucy de Ros and William de Kyme