William Ryther

     William Ryther was the son of Thomas Ryther. He witnessed Lawrence Ryther's will dated 3 December 1533 in Epworth, Lincolnshire.

William Ryther

(before 1540? - )
     William Ryther married (?) Unknown. William Ryther was born before 1540?. He was the son of Thomas Ryther and Margaret Unknown (Ryther).
     He was of Burringham in Althorp parish 1572.

Children of William Ryther and (?) Unknown

William Ryther

(before 1830 - )
     William Ryther was born before 1830.
     William Ryther married Maria Unknown (Ryther) before 1850.

Child of William Ryther and Maria Unknown (Ryther)

William Ryther

(3 November 1616 - )
     William Ryther was christened on 3 November 1616 in Finchampstead, Berkshire. He was the son of William Ryther.

William Ryther

(circa 1605? - )
     William Ryther was born circa 1605?.

Children of William Ryther

William Ryther

(22 April 1631 - )
     William Ryther was christened on 22 April 1631 in Alne, Yorkshire. He was the son of William Ryther.

William Ryther

(14 December 1628 - )
     William Ryther was christened on 14 December 1628 in Finchampstead, Berkshire. He was the son of John Ryther and Mary Clarke.

William Ryther

( - before 27 October 1575)
     William Ryther was also known as William Rither (of Eversley) in records.
     William died before 27 October 1575 in Eversley, Hampshire. He was buried on 27 October 1575 in Eversley.

William Ryther

( - circa 1589)
     William died circa 1589 in Finchampstead, Berkshire.

William Ryther

(between 14 November 1575 and 1576 - )
     William Ryther was christened between 14 November 1575 and 1576 in Eversley, Hampshire.

William Ryther

(say 1660 - )
     William Ryther was born say 1660.
     William Ryther married Mary Sawer on 23 June 1684 in Winterton, Lincolnshire.

Child of William Ryther and Mary Sawer

Sir William Ryther

(circa 1379 - 1 October 1440)
     Sir William Ryther was born circa 1379 in Yorkshire. He was aged 60 at his mother's death in 1439.. He was the son of Sir William Ryther and Sibyl de Aldeburgh.
     He was a knight in 1405. Pardoned for treason and felony and forfeitures arising therefrom was granted to William Rither, son of Sir William Rither on 8 Aug 1405, possibly on account of some part in the [Scrope Percy] rebellion of the previous May.
     Sir William Ryther and Sir William Ryther were mentioned in a deed dated 6 March 1415/16. On March 5 1415/6 Wm Ryther kt. senior and Wm Ryther kt. jr. witnessed a deed: By Richard Redemane, knight, and Robert Broun, chaplain to Brian de Stapilton, knight, of the manors of Querneby and Carleton by Snayth and lands and tenements in Farlyngton co. York, all of which the grantors had lately by the feoffment of the grantee. Witnesses William de Ryther, knight, the elder, William Ryther, knight, the younger, and others.
     Sir William Ryther married Maud or Matilda de Umfreville, daughter of Sir Thomas de Umfreville and Agnes Mallory (Gray), before 1421 in Yorkshire, England. Cokayne suggests that she must have been his second wife as she was only 28 in 1421. Jones (p.48) states that he married Constance, daughter of Sir Ralph Bygod of Settringham ERY and was High Sheriff 1478.. William was appointed Commissioner in Yorkshire, on 5 September 1424. He served on sundry commissions in Yorks, 1424-40; Knight of the Shire, Yks Jan 1425/6; sheriff of Yks 1426, 1430 1434 & 1438. It is presumably he who was sheriff of Lincs 1429.
He was appointed in a commission to inquire in Yorks, as to the concealment of land, serv. and feudal incidents from the King on 5 Sep 1424 . In the parliament of Feb 1425/5, he represented co. York , and in Dec. following was appointed to the office of Sheriff, which he also filled on three other occasions, in 1430-1, 1434-5 and 1438-9. He was also sheriff of Lincs in 1430 . At the end of his last term in office for Yorks, he did not conclude the rendering of his account, and for this Harewood, Rither and a messuage in Scarcroft were seised into the King's hands .
Rither was appointed commissioner de w.f. for the district between the Ouse, Aire, and Ure in the west riding on 16 July 1433, and this was followed by his inclusion in a commission of o.t. on 6 Aug, and in a commission to del. York gaol of Ralph Greystoke of Thorp Arch on 7 Nov. He was a commissioner of array for the east riding in July 1434 and on 17 Dec 1435, was included in a commission issued as a result of the petition of the then Earl of Northumberland for the restoration of certain lands forfeited by his grandfather. On 29 July 1438, he was granted exemption from jury service as sheriff, collector of subsidies, escheats or other royal official, and this marks the end of his career.
He was almost certainly involved in Archbishop Scrope's rebellion in 1405, but was pardoned and avoided forfeiture. He enjoyed an extremely active administrative career: four times Sheriff of Yorkshire [5,9,13, & 17th years Henry VI = 1426-7, 1430-31, 1434-5, 1438-9], he also served a term as Sheriff of Lincolnshire and represented Yorkshire in the 1426 Parliament. Harewood and Ryther were both seized by the Crown after he failed to render his account following his final period as Sheriff, but he resolved the issue successfully before his death.
     Deed poll, quitclaim dated 29 Sep 1427 between 1) Wm. Franke. Hen. Chambre. John de Thwates. Wm. Dutton; & (2) Wm. de Ryther, kt.
(1) Quitclaim to (2) all right in premises had from (2) in Alforde (Lincs.)
Witnesses.: John Langton, kt., Wm. Normanvill, kt., Hen. Vavasour, John FitzHenry, Thos. Broket, etc.
At Abbyrforth, Michaelmas, 6 Hen. VI. Seals missing; 3 tags. Parch. Latin
.
     Special assize roll and file, William Ryther and others v John Vavasour 8-9 Hen VI [1429-1430]. He was Sheriff of Lincolnshire. His principal residence was Ryther, Yorkshire, of Lincolnshire, on 10 February 1430.
     Plea of covenant. Date: One week from the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 10 Henry VI [9 February 1432]. And afterwards two weeks from Easter in the same year [4 May 1432].
Parties: Robert Dumfravyle, knight, William Ryther, knight, John Holme, esquire, Robert Haytfeld', esquire, Thomas Wilton' and Richard Haytfeld', esquire, querents, and Thomas Oudeby of Reyle in the county of Essex, gentleman, and Joan, his wife, daughter of John Sutton' of Sutton' in Holdernes, deforciants.
Property:     5 messuages, 3 tofts, 1 bovate and 9 acres of land and 17 acres of meadow in Sutton', Stanfery and Drypole in Holdernes.
Agreement: Thomas Oudeby and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Richard Haytfeld', as those which Richard, Robert, William, John, Robert and Thomas Wilton' have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to Robert, William, John, Robert, Thomas Wilton' and Richard and the heirs of Richard for ever.
Warranty. For this:     Robert, William, John, Robert, Thomas Wilton' and Richard have given them 20 marks of silver.
.
     Commission of oyer and teminer to Richard, earl of Salisbury, Henry, Earl of Northumberland, William Babyngton, James Strangways, John Ellerker, Richard Hastynges, kt; William Ryther knight; John Constable esquire, Thomas Clarell, Henry Vavasour and John Thwaytes and two or more of them including either Babynton or Strangways, on complaint by William, Abbot of St Mary's, York, that (several) other malefactors, broke into the park of the said abbot at Spaunton ... 6 August 1433.
     A William Ryther of London Esq. pledged a document to Marton Priory c.1436? re a wood called Craven Close. [E.C.P. 73 98 - Monastic chancery proceedings Yorkshire - this could refer to his son
.
     On 29 July 1438 an exemption for life of William Ryther, knight, from being put on assizes, juries or inquisiitons, and from being made collector or assessor of taxes, sheriff, escheator, constable, bailiff or other officer of the king, was granted.
     On 6 Nov 1438 William Ryther, knight, was summoned for not appearing before William Babynton and his fellows, late justices of the bench, to answer William Lassels, clerk, prebendary of Wyghton, touching a plea of 8 pounds. He was Sheriff of Yorkshire, in 1439. William was described as a living child of Sibyl de Aldeburgh on 3 September 1439.
     Exchequer documents: Accounts for Manors of Ryther (Ryder) and Harewood, held by William Rither, as in 50/36. 18-20 Hen. VI [1439-1441]; also for lands in Scarcroft.
     On 28 June 1449 Thomas Elleker of South Cave ... to answer William Ryther, knight, touching a plea of debt for 10/6/8.
     Sir William Ryther was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held in October 1440 WILLIAM RITHER, Knight. 479 Writ. ‡ 8 October 1440. [Kirkeby].
LINCOLNSHIRE. Inquisition [indented]. The castle at Lincoln. 29 October 1440. [Percy].
William Messenger of East Kirkby; Thomas Litster of Skendleby; John Magnus of Meering (Meryng); Thomas Lowe ; John Dounham ; William Godreke ; William Fichete ; John Ward ; John Dandy ; William Gudale of Langton; Walter Spencer ; John Sariant of Carlton-on-Trent (Carlton); John Ley ; and John Barton .
He was seised of the following to him and his heirs and assigns.
Celecotes, the manor, held of the king as of his duchy of Lancaster as of his honour of Bolingbroke as 1/6 knight’s fee. There is a capital messuage, worth nothing yearly; 100 a. demesne land, each acre worth 2d. yearly; 12 messuages, each worth 12d. yearly; 10 bovates, each worth 3s. yearly; 40s. assize rent taken by the hand of various free tenants; 50 a. meadow, each acre worth 8d. at mowing time, and worth nothing at present because mown in summer; and 300 a. pasture and marsh, common to all tenants, worth nothing yearly.
He died on 1 October last. William Rither is his son and next heir, and aged 35 and more.
[Head:] Delivered to court on 15 November.
C 139/103/29 mm. 1–2
480 Writ. ‡ 8 October 1440. [Kirkeby].

YORKSHIRE. Inquisition. Ozendyke. 21 October 1440. [Ughtred]. [Inquisition: ms badly galled.]
John Scargill ; William... [ms worn and torn]; William Marschall ; Robert Boteler ; John..; ?Robert ?Burston... ...wes; William Mil...er ; John ?Holton; Thomas..; Robert Habyrgeham ; and Robert Fleschewer .
He died seised of the following moieties in demesne as of fee tail, to him and the heirs male of his body, as son and heir male of the bodies of William Rither, knight, of Rithee, and Sibyl his wife, to whom Thomas Thwaytes and William Barker granted the moieties, to hold to them and the heirs male of their bodies, with remainder to the right heirs of Sibyl. The grant was made by a fine levied on the octave of St John the Baptist 1403 [CP 25/1/279/149, no. 46], shown to the jurors. Royal licence was obtained regarding 1/2 manor of Harewood.
Harewood, 1/2 manor, with the exception of the entire site which is a castle called Harewood Castle, and also except a close called ‘le Conynggerth’. There are 45 a. demesne land, each acre worth 4d. yearly; a close called ‘Stoktonfeld’ with a parcel of land called ‘le Fittes’, containing 200 a. land, each acre worth 4d. yearly; a parcel of land called ‘le Sandbed’, containing 4 a. land, each acre worth 4d. yearly; a common pasture called ‘Harwodmore’, containing 1000 a. moor and waste wood, worth nothing yearly; 2 burgages in the vill, each worth 12d. yearly; 2 cottages, each worth 12d. yearly; a smithy, worth 12d. yearly; and 1/2 oven, worth 12d. yearly. Within the moiety, in the vill of Dunkeswick, there are 8 messuages, worth nothing yearly, and 17 bovates, each worth 4s. yearly; and in the vill of Healthwaite there are 3 messuages, each worth 6d. yearly, and 4 bovates and meadow, each worth 4s. yearly. There is 32s. service rent, taken yearly by the hand of various free tenants, payable at Martinmas and Pentecost equally. The moiety, exceptions excepted, is held of the king in chief as 1/4 knight’s fee.
Kirkby Overblow, 1/2 manor, held of Henry, earl of Northumberland , as of his manor of Spofforth, service unknown. There is the site of 1/2 manor, waste and worth nothing yearly; 7 ruinous messuages, worth nothing yearly; 2 waste cottages, worth nothing yearly; 14 bovates, each worth 3s. yearly; 20 a. land, each acre worth 3d. yearly; 30 a. wood, worth nothing yearly above enclosure; and 12s. 8d. free rent and rent of a pair of gloves taken yearly by the hand of various tenants at Martinmas and Pentecost equally.
He died seised of the following manors and advowsons in demesne as of fee tail by grant of John son of Robert Roos of Helmsley to William Rither of Scarcroft and Lucy his wife, and the heirs of Lucy’s body, with reversion to John and the heirs of his body, with remainder to Alexander, brother of John, and the heirs of his body, and then reversion to the right heirs of William. The grant was made by a fine levied on the morrow of the Purification of Mary 1280 [CP 25/1/266/59, no. 54], shown to the jurors. By the same fine, John granted the manors and advowsons to the same William for life if Lucy should die without heir of her body. William, named in the writ, is kin and heir of William, named in the fine, and kin and heir of Lucy, viz., son of William son of Robert son of Robert son of Robert son of William and Lucy.
Ryther, the manor and advowsons of the church.n377 The manor is held of the king in chief as of his duchy of Lancaster as of his honour of Pontefract as 1/8 knight’s fee. There is a capital messuage and 2 gardens, worth nothing yearly; 8 waste messuages, worth nothing yearly; 8 waste cottages, worth nothing yearly; 460 a. land, each acre worth 3d. yearly; 40 a. meadow, each acre worth 12d. yearly; and 202 a. wood, worth 100s. yearly.
Scarcroft, the manor, held of Henry Vavasour in chief by service of one rose yearly for all secular services. There are 4 waste messuages and 3 waste cottages, worth nothing yearly; 202 a. land, each acre worth 3d. yearly; 320 a. moor, worth 10s. yearly; and 22 a. wood, worth nothing yearly above enclosure.
Date of death and heir as 479.
[Head:] Delivered to court on 14... [ms galled].
C 139/103/29 mm. 3–4
E 149/170/7 m. 1
n377^: Described in ms as ‘advowsons of the church of Ryther’, and constently plural throughout: there was the parish church in Ryther as well as a chapel attached to Lead Hall. The reference to more than one advowson in ms may indicate both places of worship, despite only explicit reference to the parish church..
     William died on 1 October 1440 in Harewood, Yorkshire. At his death he was seized of half of Harewood castle and manor, and of the manors of Rither, Spofforth, and Scarcroft in Yorks, and also of the manor of 'Colecotes, Lincs" His heir was his son William aged 35.

Children of Sir William Ryther and Maud or Matilda de Umfreville

Sir William Ryther

(circa 1405 - 19 July 1475)
     Sir William Ryther was born circa 1405 in Ryther, Yorkshire. He was aged 35 at his father's death. He was the son of Sir William Ryther and Maud or Matilda de Umfreville.
     Special assize roll and file, William Ryther and others v John Vavasour 8-9 Hen VI [1429-1430].
     Sir William Ryther married Elizabeth Gascoigne, daughter of William Gascoigne and Jane Wyman, before 1435. Gascoigne pedigree states Elizabeth daughter of Wm Gascoigne & Jane married Sir Wm Ryther & her sister Ann married Richard Redman. They had 2 sons and 3 daughters.
     As William Rither the younger he was joint grantee of a wardship in Nov 1435.
     Sir William Ryther married secondly Eleanor Fitzwilliam circa 1437. 1584/5 & 1612 visitation of Yorkshire: Fitzwilliam of Sprotborough - Elinor daughter of Sir John & Margaret Fitzwilliam, Lord of Emley married Wm Ryther of Ryther kt [1571 mss].
     Exchequer documents: Accounts for Manors of Ryther (Ryder) and Harewood, held by William Rither, as in 50/36. 18-20 Hen. VI [1439-1441]; also for lands in Scarcroft. William was described as a living child of Sir William Ryther on 1 October 1440.
     William, son and heir of William Ryther is granted a certificate of homage 1 Dec 1440.
     In 1445 he was granted market fair & free warren at Harewood by patent.
     Imprimus and confirmation, by advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal in the Parliament held at Westminster in the king's firt year, to William Ryther, knight and Richard Redman, esquire, tenants of the manor of Harewood, cdo. York, of letters patnet dated 4 Dec, 8 Henry V, nspecting and confirming letters patent dated 12 Nov 8 Henry IV. Sir William Ryther was Sheriff of Lincolnshire. His principal residence was Harewood, Yorkshire of Lincolnshire, on 3 December 1450.
     Lincolnshire: Grant description and date: subsidy on lands, wages and fees granted by Parliament 1450 June 5 - Receipts and particulars of account for the first collection, roll of 4 mems. Particulars of the account of William Ryther, former sheriff, in a leather pouch. Estimated date of document: 1451 Nov 8 or later.
     Debtor: William Ryther, knight [held part of a fee in Ryther [Barkston Ash Wapentake] and Leeds [Skyrack Wapentake, W.R.Yorks], Creditor: John Thirsk of York, merchant. Amount: 300m. of legal English money. Before whom: Richard Wartre, Mayor of York; John Sherwood, Clerk. 1454 Nov 8.
     Sir William Ryther was mentioned in a deed dated 9 January 33 Henry VI 1454/5. The property was at Parlington. He witnessed deeds relating to Fenton church in 1457.
     His inclusion in the commission of treasons etc. Dec 1460 proves him a Yorkist.
     At Westminster. One week from the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 8 Edward IV [9 February 1469].
Parties: John Sayer the elder, esquire, querent, and William Ryther, knight, and Eleanor, his wife, deforciants.
Property:     The manor of Magna Wyrkesale and 31 messuages, 50 bovates of land and 8 acres of meadow in Magna Wyrkesale, Pykton' and Stayndalerygge.
Plea of covenant. Agreement: William and Eleanor have acknowledged the manor and tenements to be the right of John, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of William to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty by William and Eleanor for themselves and the heirs of Eleanor, against George, abbot of Westminster, and his successors.
For this: John has given them 300 pounds sterling.
Places: Low Worsall, Picton, Staindale (all 3 in Kirklevington).
     Sir William Ryther made a will dated 20 June 1475 in Ryther. 20 June 1475, I lord William Ryther of Ryther, knight... to God & Blessed virgin Mary, to be buried in my parish church of Ryther. I leave to the rector of my church aforesaid for my forgotten and imperfectly paid tithes 20 sh. Item, I leave to the fabric of the cathedral church of blessed Peter, York, 20 sh.
Item. I leave to the brothers of the Order of St Francis in the City of York 20 sh. Item, I leave to the other brothers in the said 6/8 to each of their Houses.
Item, I leave all the cloths and tiles within my lordship of Ryther to the aforesaid church for the building of a belfry.
Item, I leave to Johanna Ryther my daughter, as part of her marriage portion 'le frer hag' with all appurtenances ... to the said Johanna a boat ...
Item I will that my feoffees pay to the afsd Johanna my daughter from the rents of my maner at Cottis, for her marriage honorably made ...
Item, I leave to Robert Ryther my son, knight all the convenient necessaries in the bakehouse, the brewhouse and the maltkiln, etc. a large brass pot and three glasses?, a green hanging of 'tapestre work', two featherbeds, two chests, 1 cloth of twill, two towels of twill, four cloths of linen for the table in the hall, one trotting horse.
I leave to Elionora my wife the third part of all my goods, movable and fixed "tertiam partes" I will that the afsd Elionora have the feoffment and fealty promised by her friends on the day of our wedding. ...
The residue of all my goods not above bequeathed ... to my executors ... as seems best to them...
Executors - John Nevill of Leversage Esq, William Ryther my son, & Sir John Stodfield vicar of Brayton. Guy Farefax supervisor. Witnesses Master Robert Ryther Rector of Ryther, Sir John Bykerton chaplain, Wm Snell & Nicholas Holgate.

     William died on 19 July 1475 in Ryther, YKS. He was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held after 19 July 1475. He was buried in All Saints, Ryther. Effigy at Ryther church - altar tomb with sides richly panelled, the figure of a knight accoutred in martial habit as worn in the era of the Wars of the Roses. His gorget is of mail and his collar of white rose rayonee, or, and a sun in splendour, being the badge of Edvward IV. His head reclines upon his helmet, from which the crest has been cut. His right foot rest against a dog, collared and beneath his left is a talbot, while sword and daggar are on either side. Three sides of the tomb have been beautifully sculptured, that on the north having the figures of four knights and four ladies, while there are three ladies on the west and three knights on the east side. It commemorates the "hero of Towton", Sir William Ryther, Kt.
     He provided tyles, bricks & slates to build the tower of Ryther Church in 1476.
     His will was proved on 14 October 1476 at the Prerogative Court of York.

Children of Sir William Ryther and Elizabeth Gascoigne

Children of Sir William Ryther and Eleanor Fitzwilliam

Sir William Ryther

(before 1360 - circa 1426)
     Sir William Ryther was born before 1360 in Yorkshire. In 1396 Sir William Ryther is described as nephew [nepos ]& heir of Sir John de Toutheby. Son & heir of Robert according to the 1491 pedigree.. He was the son of Robert Ryther Lord of Ryther and Margaret Tothby.
     Sir William Ryther married Sibyl de Aldeburgh, daughter of Sir William de Aldeburgh and Elizabeth Mowbray? - not de Lisle, circa 1379.      
Sir William Ryther paid the poll tax in 1379 in Ryther, Yorkshire. Barkeston, Rythir: Willelmus le Ryther, Esquier & uxor 6/4. He was listed as an "Esquire of the less estate".
     He joined in a Yorks recognisance in 1381; was a commissioner of inquiry there 1384 & 1390, and collector of taxes 1395 & 1398.
     He was of Ryther Castle, Lord of Scarcroft, 1392 Lord of a moiety of Harewood. He obtained Harewood by a fine (purchase) from Thomas Thwates and William Barker the connection being through his wife Sybil de Alburgh as shown by the inquisition post mortem of Robert Ryther (6 Hen VII). It mentioned that he died seised of a moiety of Harwood in tail male, by the gift of Thomas Thwates & Wm Barker, made by way of fine, with the King's licence to one William Ryther, kt. & Sibyl his wife, thereof in tail male, with remainder in default to her right heirs, he being [great grandson]. Note that the Barkers had Scarcroft before the Rythers.
     One week from St Michael, 16 Richard [II] [6 October 1392]. Parties: Robert ConestableofFlaynburgh', knight, andPeter Tillyoll', knight, querents, andWilliam de Ryther, knight, andSibel, his wife, andElizabeth, who was the wife ofBrian de Stapilton', knight, the younger, deforciants. Property: 40 marks of rent issuing from the manors of Harewod'andKerebyand 60 messuages, 20 tofts, 12 carucates of land, 100 acres of meadow, 1000 acres of meadow and 30 acres of wood inHarewod',Kereby,Carleton',Dunkesewyk'andKirkeby Orblawers.
Plea of covenant. Agreement: William and Sibel and Elizabeth have acknowledged the rent to be the right of Robert, and have rendered it to Robert and Peter in the same court, to receive each year by the hands of William and Sibel and Elizabeth and the heirs of Sibel and Elizabeth, to wit, 5 marks at the feast of St Martin, 5 marks at Christmas, 5 marks at the feast of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 5 marks at the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, 5 marks at the feast of the Invention of the Holy Cross, 5 marks at the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist, 5 marks at the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Mary and also 5 marks at the feast of St Michael, to Robert and Peter and the heirs of Robert, for ever. Robert and Peter and the heirs of Robert shall have the right to distrain. For this: Robert and Peter have given them 500 marks of silver
.
     Two weeks from St Martin, 16 Richard [II] [25 November 1392].
Parties: William Gascoigne and John, his brother, clerk, querents, and [William] de Rither, knight, and Sibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property:     A moiety of 60 acres of land, of 8 acres of meadow, of 4 acres of wood and of 16 acres of pasture in Harwod', Gaukethorp' and Hederik'.
Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Rither and Sibel have acknowledged the moiety to be the right of William Gascoigne, as that which the same William and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Sibel to William Gascoigne and John and the heirs of William for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this:William Gascoigne [and] John have given them 20 pounds sterling.
.
     Sir William Ryther and Sir Bryan de Stapleton were mentioned on 18 October 1393.
     Westminster. Three weeks from St Michael, 18 Richard [II] [20 October 1394].
Parties:
The prior ofBella Valleof the Carthusian order, querent, andWilliam de Ryther, knight, andSibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 40 shillings of rent issuing from a moiety of the manors ofKerebyandKirkeby Orblawers.
Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William and Sibel have granted to the prior the rent and have rendered it to him in the same court, to receive each year, to wit, a moiety at the feast of St Martin and the other moiety at Pentecost, by the hands of William and Sibel and the heirs of Sibel, to the prior and his successors and their church of the Holy Trinity of Bella Valle, for ever. The prior and his successors shall have the right to distrain.
For this: The prior has given them 20 pounds sterling.
Beauvale Priory(in Nottinghamshire),Kearby Town End(in Kirkby Overblow),Kirkby Overblow. Sir William Ryther was licensed for a chauntry in Alford church on 18 July 1396 in Alford, Lincolnshire. Sir William Ryther, kt. paid 20 marks to the King and power was granted to ... assign a rent .. issuing out of the manors of Toutheby and Rigsby, for a chaplain to say mass for the soul of Sir John de Toutheby, knt [who was apparently living in 1376]. Sir William Ryther is described as nephew & heir of Sir John de Toutheby. The chantry is for the soul of Sir John Toutheby, Knt. his son Robert, and his wife Joan, and for the good estate of Sir William Ryther, Knt, Joan his wife and the children of Alianore wife of Sir John de Toutheby Knt.
     Sir William Ryther was mentioned in a deed dated 1397 in Saleby, Yorkshire. William Ryther gave 20 marks for license to found a chantry in the church at Alford in Lincolnshire, for the soul of John Totheby? of Alford.
     Robert Barkeston of Barkeston & William de Ryther, knight, were both summonded at Westminster June 16, 1398 for not appearing to answer John Hyldyard, clerk, touching a debt of 20 pounds.
     One week from St Hilary, 22 Richard [II] [20 January 1399].
Parties: William Gascoigne, Richard Gascoigne and Robert Gellesthorp', chaplain, querents, and William de Ryther, knight, and Sibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property:     1 toft, 100 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and 6 acres of wood in Harewode and a moiety of the manor of Ker[e?]by.
Action:     Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Ryther and Sibel have acknowledged the tenements and moiety to be the right of William Gascoigne, as those which the same William, Richard and Robert have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Sibel to William Gascoigne, Richard and Robert and the heirs of William for ever.
Warranty for William Gascoigne, Richard and Robert have given them 100 pounds sterling..
     Westminster. One week from St Hilary, 22 Richard [II] [20 January 1399].
Parties: William Gascoigne,Richard GascoigneandRobert Gellesthorp', chaplain, querents, andWilliam de Ryther, knight, andSibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 toft, 100 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and 6 acres of wood inHarewodeand a moiety of the manor ofKer[e?]by.
Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Ryther and Sibel have acknowledged the tenements and moiety to be the right of William Gascoigne, as those which the same William, Richard and Robert have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Sibel to William Gascoigne, Richard and Robert and the heirs of William for ever.
For this: William Gascoigne, Richard and Robert have given them 100 pounds sterling.
     One week from Holy Trinity, 22 Richard [II] [1 June 1399].
Parties:John de Rygton', chaplain, and William Talpe, chaplain, querents, and William de Ryther, knight, and Sibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property:     1 messuage, 1 toft, 5 bovates of land, 3 acres of meadow, the works of 1 man for 30 days in Autumn, the works of 2 men at plough with 8 oxen for 9 days each year and 22 shillings of rent in Estcarleton' by Gysselay and Lofthous by Harrewode.
Action:     Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Ryther and Sibel have acknowledged the tenements and works to be the right of John, as those which John and William Talpe have of their gift, to hold to John and William Talpe and the heirs of John, of the chief lords for ever.
For this:     John and William Talpe have given them 100 marks of silver.. He was licensed for an oratory in his house at Towthby on 20 November 1399 in Alford, Lincolnshire. The licence was granted to Sir William Ryther, kt., and his wife to have mass said "infra manerium de Towthby".
     At Westminster. Two weeks from St Hilary, 3 Henry [IV] [27 January 1402].
Parties:     Nicholas Gascoigne, Richard Gascoigne, Robert de Gelles[thorp'], chaplain, William Scotte, Henry del Chaumbre and John del Chaumbre, querents, and William de Ryther, knight, and Sibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property:     A moiety of the manor of Kelfeld'.
Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Ryther and Sibel have acknowledged the moiety to be the right of Nicholas, as that which Nicholas, Richard, Robert, William Scotte, Henry and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Sibel to Nicholas, Richard, Robert, William Scotte, Henry and John and the heirs of Nicholas for ever.
Warranty.
For this:     Nicholas, Richard, Robert, William Scotte, Henry and John have given them 100 marks of silver.
     At Westminster. One week from St John the Baptist, 4 Henry [IV] [1 July 1403].
Parties: William Barker of Tadcastre and Thomas Thwaytes of Lofthous, querents, and William de Ryther, knight, and Sibel, his wife, deforciants.
Property:     A moiety of the manors of Harrewod' and Kirkebyorblawers.
Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Ryther and Sibel have acknowledged the moiety to be the right of William Barker, as that which the same William and Thomas have of their gift.
For this: William Barker and Thomas have granted to William de Ryther and Sibel the moiety and have rendered it to them in the same court, to hold to William de Ryther and Sibel and the male heirs of their bodies, of the chief lords for ever. In default of such heirs, remainder to the right heirs of Sibel.
     On the 14th March 1408, there having happened a great difference between Sir William de Ryther and Sibilla his wife, he appeared before Henry Archbishop of York (then at the manor of Cawood) where he took corporal oath thenceforth to use her honestly and kindly observing certain articles (1) To do her no bodily harm or imprison her, but keep her in full freedom as a man of his degree ought to do with his wife, without doing or saying anything that may be reproof or villany to her person (2) To void Marion of Grindon out of his company and out of his children's company as long as the aforesaid Sibill lives, and to have nothing to do with the aforesaid Marion by way of sin (3) To find his wife and her maiden and her chamberer meat and drink reasonable for her estate. Witnessed by Richard Redmayne [Brother-in-law & co-occupier of Harewood Castle], Sir Henry Vavasour [manorial Lord], Henry Fitzhenry (Archbishop of York].
     Sir William Ryther was mentioned in a deed dated 1410 in Saleby, Yorkshire. In 1410 among the tenants of Thomas Colepepper, then lord of Saleby, was John de Southeby, filius Dom. William de Ryther, milit. In the previous year the same William de Ryther was fined 2d. for non-attendance at the Saleby Court Leet.
     Sir William Ryther and Sir William Ryther were mentioned in a deed dated 6 March 1415/16. On March 5 1415/6 Wm Ryther kt. senior and Wm Ryther kt. jr. witnessed a deed: By Richard Redemane, knight, and Robert Broun, chaplain to Brian de Stapilton, knight, of the manors of Querneby and Carleton by Snayth and lands and tenements in Farlyngton co. York, all of which the grantors had lately by the feoffment of the grantee. Witnesses William de Ryther, knight, the elder, William Ryther, knight, the younger, and others.
     5 September 1524: Commission to Ralph Grastock, Richard Redman, William Rither and Robert Roose, of Inghamthorpe, knights, and to John Ellerker, Guy Rocliff, William Moston and Thomas Lindleye, or any two or more of them, the four last named being of the quorum to make Inquisition in the county of Yorkshire as to lands, tenements, meadows, pastures, services, wardships, marriages & escheats alledged to have been concealed from the King within the said county.
     William died circa 1426 in Yorkshire. He was buried circa 1426 in Harewood, Yorkshire. The Ryther monument lies under the arch between the chancel and the south, or Gascoigne chapel. Each side has nine buttressed panels, five of which contain a small shield; the other four originally contained carved figures but these have all been lost. The effigies are in most respects the counterparts of those on the Redman tomb but with obvious differences in detail. Sir William's crest is the dragon's head of Ryther and his collar a plain broad band of SS. An unusual feature is the forepart of a small animal, possibly a hare, under each foot. Sir William Ryther's family came from Ryther Castle, between Selby and Tadcaster. Records show that the Ryther marriage had its difficulties and Sir William appears to have been a violent and tyrannical man; he died in about 1426 but Sybil survived him until 1440.
     Sir William Ryther was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held in Yorkshire, in 1430.

Children of Sir William Ryther and Sibyl de Aldeburgh

Sir William Ryther

(circa 1250 - between August 1309 and March 1327)
     Sir William Ryther was born circa 1250 in Ryther, Yorkshire. He was the son of William Ryther. Sir William Ryther witnessed deeds of title in Milford as Sir Wm de Ryther, [and] his son in February 1273/74.
     In 1278 he appears among the witnesses in a suit, at the assize held in 1278, concerning the right of free passage on the river between York & Boroughbridge, and of fishing free of toll, which the Earl of Cornwall had established.
He also witnesses the gift by Roger Saxton, rector of the church of Fishergate, of several parcels of land in Saxton, to the hospital of St Leonard, York. He is also mentioned as having held the manor of Cowthorpe as feoffee during the reign of Edward I.
     Sir William de Ryther was in many engagements at home and abroad, and was summoned to parliament in 1279 as a Baron of the Realm.
     Lucy de Ros married secondly Sir William Ryther circa 1280. He married, in or before 1280 Lucy, ?daughter of John de Ros, son of Robert, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley. At the Inquisition Post Mortem for Robert Ryther (6 Hen VII) it is mentioned that he held the manor & advowson of Ryther, by virtue of gift made by John, son of Robert Roos, by way of fine & with the King's licence, to one William Ryther and Lucy his wife in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said William ...
     Fine dated 1280: 28. York. Morrow of Hil. 8 Edw I. Before the same. Between John, son of Robert de Ros of Hamelak, quer., and William de Rither, deforc. [seller], of the manors of Rither, Schardecroft, Gyldhusum' and the advowson of Rither church. Covenant. John's right as of William's gift. John and his heirs to hold of the chief lords. William and his heirs to warrant. For a sore sparrowhawk.
This feoffment was the first stage of a settlement. The second fine as given by John took place very soon after, on February 2 1280.
54. York. Morrow of Cand. Before the same. Between William de Ryther, quer., and John de Ros, deforc., [seller] of the manors of Ryther, Scarthecroft and Gildehus' with the advowson of Ryther church. Covenant. John's right. William and Lucy his wife and the heirs of Lucy's body to hold of the chief lords with remainder to William and reversion after William's death to John and the heirs of his body with remainders to Alexander, John's brother, and the heirs of his body and to William's next heirs.

Rosie Bevan wrote: The two fines had a threefold purpose - feoffment, marriage jointure, and protection against wardship of the lands in case of a minority.
That Gildersdale was of the fee of Ros at the time of the settlement, there is no question - it is listed in Feudal Aids with Robert's holding as chief lord given in the past tense, meaning its tenure was recorded just after his decease in 1285. Its two carucates had descended to the Ros family via the Trussebuts, with William de Ros inheriting it on the death of his aunt Agatha in 1247. It is possible that John had been enfeoffed in this manor, but there are indications that Rithers were tenants long before it passed into Ros posession, and the marriage settlement shows that it was unlikely to have been Lucy's maritagium.
The settlement of the Ryther lands on Lucy and her issue is characteristic of a jointure, an increasingly preferred method of marrying off daughters without reducing the family estate by the end of the thirteenth century. A sum of money passed hands as the bride's marriage portion, and in return there was a settlement of the groom's lands on her for life. The jointure also protected the issue of the marriage from claims by other children of the husband from earlier or later marriages. Most importantly if the husband died leaving a widow and underage children, the lord did not have wardship of that land.
John de Ros must have been related to Lucy in some way. Usually the principals of a marriage jointure were the father or brother providing dowry, but in this case it is possible that being a secondary marriage it was only a small one, and with Lucy's youth, William Rither was more interested in her Audley dower.
Chronology goes against Lucy being daughter of John, but she may certainly have been a younger daughter of Robert de Ros and Isabel D'Aubigny who were married around 1244. We would expect them to have had a daughter called Lucy, named after Robert's mother. At a guess it is possible that John and Alexander were clerics and did not expect to leave heirs. The reversion to them on the death of William in the event of lack of heirs would represent a refund of the marriage portion, with the lands ultimately passing to William's right heirs after their death.
As it happens, the Ryther lands did pass down William's direct line, so the fine clearly served its primary intent. Notably, while Scarcroft and Ryther descended with his heirs, there is no mention of Gildersdale in the 1491 inquisition for Robert Ryther, so it appears to have passed out of the family in the intervening 211 years
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     He was witness to a quitclaim dated 10 Jul 1280: By Roger son of Thomas Poytevyn to William de Stopham of all rights in the manor of Toueton.
Witnesses: Sir William le Vavasur, Francis Tyays, William de Ryther, Robert de Holm, Alexander de Ledes, William de Herthington, Robert de Berley, kts., Robert de Panyly, Nicholas de Okelesthorp.

At York, before I. de Vallis and the justices in eyre, Wednesday after the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr, 8 Edw. I..
     Staff. and Salop. William de Ryther and Lucy his wife sued William de Audidelegh for a third of the manor of Helley (Heleigh), Dymmesdale, and Boteresdon, and for a third of the passagium of Wrimestrete, and of the advowson of Audelegh; for a third of the manors of Betteley, Dunestall, and of the vills of Borewardeslyme (Burslem), Talk, Knotton, and Thurfeld, and for a third of a rent of 20s. and of a dozen knives (cutellorum), and of half a pound of cumin in Newcastle-under-Lyme, one-third of a water mill in Chaveldon, a third of 10s. rent in Ruston, a third of 2s. rent in Ridierd, a third of 12s. rent in Stanle in co. Stafford, and a third of the vill of Forde, and of two parts of Marchumley, Weston, Redcastle, Kentenesdon, Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, and of a third of 10s. rent in Moston in co. Salop as her dower, of the gift of Henry de Audidelegh her first husband.
William appeared and stated he only held a virgate of land in Dymmesdale, and 6d. rent in Boteresdon, and a bovate of land in Knotton, and that Ela the widow of James de Audelegh held a mark of rent in Newcastleunder-Lyme, and she also held a third of his tenements in Riston (Rushton), Ridiert, Stanle, Wymerstrete, and Audelegh and Moston; and in Lakne, Wykeshull, and Haukeston, he only held the services of John de Lakne, Robert de Wykeshull, and William de Haukeston; and this was the whole of his tenure when Lucy sued out her writ, viz., on 2nd November, 8 E. I., and he appealed to a jury, and William de Rither and Lucy likewise. The Sheriff is ordered to summon a jury for five weeks from Easter. m. 49, dorso
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     He held a knight's fee in the honour of Pontefract in 1284.
     Debtor: Roger de Mowbray, knight [held lands in 9 wapentakes in N. and W.R.Yorks]
Creditor: William de Ryther [knight, Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R., Yorks.].Amount: 28m.
Before whom: John Sampson, Mayor of York; James de Lissington, Clerk.
First term: 11/11/1285
Last term: 11/11/1285
Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks
Sent by: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; James de Lissington, Clerk.
Note: Inquisition and return.Date: 1285,
Debtor: Roger de Mowbray [held lands in 9 wapentakes in N. and W.R.Yorks] Creditor: William ... ...Ryther [knight, Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R., Yorks.]. Amount: 28m. Before whom: John Sampson, Mayor of York. First term: 13/05/1285 Last term: 13/05/1285 Writ to: Sheriff of Lincs Sent by: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; James de Lissington, Clerk. ....
     Debtor: William le Fleming, and Thomas de Alta Ripa, of Yorks. Creditor: William de Ryther [knight, Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R.Yorks]
Amount: 10m. Before : John Sampson, Mayor of York. First term: 02/06/1286, Last term: 02/06/1286. Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks Sent by: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; James de Lissington, Clerk.
Note: Inquisition and return: sicut nobis constat per inspeccionem Rotulorum de Recognicionibus debitorum de tempore predicti Iohannis et scripti obligatorii ipsorum Willelmi et Thome.
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     He was Keeper of the peace, Yorks, 1287; and summoned that year to a military council at Gloucester.
     He is mentioned in deeds relating to Hornington from 1287-1303; his son William is also mentioned there 18 March 1301/2; by 1317 the lands are mentioned in the name of Sir Robert Ryther.
     Debtor: John de Milford. Creditor: Sir William de Ryther [knight, Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R.Yorks] Amount: 40s.
Before whom: John Sampson, Mayor of York; James de Lissington, Clerk.
First term: 02/06/1286, Last term: 02/06/1287. Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks
Sent by: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; James de Lissington, Clerk.
Endorsement: Tongue: Domino Cancellario pro domino Willelmo de Richer.
. He witnessed a deed at Hutton Magna (Hoton Longuylers), parish of Gilling, as Wm de Ryther kt in 1288.
     In 1289 he was assessor of subsidy for Yorkshire.
     Debtor: William Constable [knight, of Flamborough, Dickering Wapentake, E.R.Yorks]. Creditor: Sir William de Ryther [knight, Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R.Yorks ]. Amount: 50m. Before: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; John le Spicer, Clerk. First term: 24/06/1288. Last term: 29/05/1289. Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks
Sent by: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.
Inquisition and return..
     Debtor: John de Bath [of Lincs]. Creditor: William Ryther [knight, Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R.Yorks]
Amount: £10. Before: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; Robert de Seizevaux , Clerk. First term: 24/06/1289. Last term: 24/06/1289. Writ to: Sheriff of Lincs. Sent by: Nicholas de Selby, Mayor of York; Robert de Seizevaux , Clerk.
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     The de Banco Rolls of 19 Edw I [1290] record an action of the Prior of Bolton against William de Ryther and others for hunting in the Prior's free warren at Wygedon and Brandon and taking hares.
     In 1291 he was a commissioner of oyer and terminer, and summoned for service in Scotland.
     A Chancery document dated 20 Nov 1293 (22 Edw I) for William de Rither and Lucy his wife grants land in Ryther to the Master and brethren of St Nicholas in York in exchange for land there, retaining the manor of Ryther.
     In 1293 a writ dated at Westminster re the Inquisition taken at York [30 Jan 1293/4] re William de Rither and Lucy his wife who assigned two acres of their meadow with the appurtenances in Rither to the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St Nicholas, York in exchange for two acres of the said master and brethren. The last named two acres are held of the said William & Lucy in pure almoign, and are worth 6 s. a year. The two acres of meadow of the said Wm & Lucy are also worth 6 s. a year, and are held of Henry Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, together with the manor of Rither, by knight's service; which manor with appurtenances, worth in all issues £40, remains to the said William and Lucy beyond the gift aforesaid, and is sufficient to do the customs and service due, etc.
     He was summoned to the Council upon the question of Gascony in June 1294.
     Debtor: Peter de Appleby [citizen and merchant of York]. Creditor: Sir William de Ryther, knight [held Ryther in Barkston-Ash Wapentake, W.R.Yorks]
Amount: £30. Before : John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk. First term: 11/11/1292, Last term: 24/05/1293. Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks. Sent by: John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.
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     A document dated 3 Jun 1298 states:      
Debtor: Peter de Appleby [citizen and merchant of York]
Creditor: William de Rither, knight [held Rither in Barkston Ash Wapentake, W.R.Yorks]
Amount: £30.
Before whom: Roger Basy, Mayor of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.
First term: 18/11/1292
Last term: 24/05/1293
Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks
Sent by: James le Fleming, Mayor of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.. He bore arms: at the Battle of Falkirk 1298, and also at the siege of Carlaverock 1300, azure, 3 crescents or (F); Parly Roll, &c. See monumental effigy drawn in "Dictionary of Heraldry". Another William's arms are differenced with a label (5) gules (F) Arden & St George Rolls.
There was also a Sire Thomas Wither (sic) who bore at the battle of Boroughbridge 1322, argent, a fess between 3 crescents gules (F.) Jenyns' Ordinary. Also William Wither (sic) (H III Roll) bore, agent, 3 crescents gules (F) St George Roll. The similarity of arms and names suggest that these are his sons.
     In 1299 the King granted him licence of free warren in Ryther, Dunholme and Thornton, and in 1303 in Scarcroft in the parish of Thorner, Hornington and Gildersome.
In 28 Edw.I (1300), he had a grant of free warren in Ryther, Dunholme, and Thornton; in 32 Edw I (1304) also in Scarcroft, Horninton, and Gildersome.
     Baron Rythre by writ of summons dated 29 Dec 1299. In the 25th year of the reign of Edw I, Sir William de Rythre having taken part in the Scottish & French wars was summoned to parliament until 26th Aug 1307.
He was summoned to parliament 20 Dec 28 Edw I to 26 Aug 1 Edw II [1299-1307] ... In Jan 1299/1300 he was summoned to be at the Exchequer at York, to treat with the Council touching the affairs of the West Riding. In 1302 and later years he had grants of various custodies, one of which was in Ireland, where he went in 1303. He was appointed in 1306 to conduct the Bishops of St Andrews and Glasgow, Scottish prisoners, into England, as far as Nottingham.
     The accounts of the wardrobe of Edward I (1299) inform us that Dom. Will. de Rithre, banneret, received £67.13.0 for the wages of himself and his retinue, consisting of two knights and five esquires for the 14 July on which day his horses were valued, to the 29 Sep, when one of his knights, Dom. William de Beeston, returned, being 77 days, £50.15.0. And for himself, one knight and five esquires from the 28 Sep to 13 Oct on which day another of his knights returned, being 14 days £7.14.5; and for himself and his five esquires from 18 Oct to 3 Nov, 22 days £9.18.0.
     He served in the wars in 1299. His name is mentioned in the poem of the siege of Carlaverock (1299) amongst the knights present and there we have the first notice of his arms, which to be seen in Ryther church and in the old Minster at York. "William de Ridre was there, Who in a blue banner did bear, The Crescent of gold so fair". The crescent may suggest a connection with the crusades to the Holy Land.      
Sir William Ryther paid the Lay subsidy in 1301 in Ryther, YKS.
     Sir William Ryther and William Ryther were mentioned in a deed dated between 18 March 1301 and 1302 in Hornington, Yorkshire. Regarding the manor of.
     In 1309 he was patron of Ryther church - Will de Ryther mil. A Sir Wm de Ryther mentioned in 1250 (his father?).
     William was buried between August 1309 and March 1327 in Ryther, YKS. Ryther church contained two shields at the west end of the south aisle - de Ros (gules, 3 water bougets, argent) and Ryther. In the east window of the same aisle appear the arms of Ryther & Redman. He and his wife appear to be the subject of the table tomb effigies in Ryther church, a cross legged knight in chain armour, with pointed and ridged bascinet, and limbs protected with jambs or shin-plates, characteristic of the transition period of Edw II. His lady has the characteristic wimpole or gorget of the same period.
None of his descendants was summoned to parliament.
He was presumably the descendant of the William son of Gilbert de Rie - more likely grandson than son ... He had younger sons Sir John, Piers, Nicholas & William.

     Debtor: John, the son of William de Ryther [knight, of Barkston-Ash Wapentake, W.R., Yks.].
Creditor: Master Adam de Armin , Parson of the Church of Gargrave [Staincliffe Wapentake, W.R., Yks.]. Amount: £68.Before whom: Chancery.First term: 24/06/1325. Last term: 11/11/1325
Writ to: Sheriff of Yorks. Sent by: Chancery. Endorsement: Roger de Somerville, Sheriff of Yorks., replies that he received this writ at York on Sun., 01/02/1327, by the hand of Thomas de ..., which was too late for it to be executed. Note: Inquisition and return: Date given for the return to Chancery: 03/02/1327. Date: 1327 Jan 8
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     Sir William Ryther was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held in York, Yorkshire, on 17 June 1327. Writ: Rithre: The manor held of the late King Edward as of the honour of Pontefract, now in the Kings hand by reason of the forfeiture of Thomas late Earl of Lancaster, by service of a moiety of a knights fee, which manor the present King granted to Maud, late the wife of the said Robert, to hold until the full age of the heir, who still holds it.
Scarthecroft: The manor held of John de Rithre, was of the manor of Heselwode by service of a quarter of a knights fee; which manor was committed to the said Maud by a like grant of the King. William his son & heir aged 12 years is his next heir
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Children of Sir William Ryther and Lucy de Ros

William Rider Ryther

(20 March 1722/23 - before 8 April 1723)
     William Rider Ryther was also known as Ryder in records. He was christened on 20 March 1722/23 in York, Yorkshire. He was the son of Thomas Ryther.
     William died before 8 April 1723 in York, Yorkshire. He was buried on 8 April 1723 in York, Yorkshire.

Capt William Ryder Ryther

     Capt William Ryder Ryther was the son of John Ryder and Bridget Parvin.

Sir William Ryder Ryther

(circa 1544 - 30 August 1611)
     Rider [Ryder], Sir William (c.1544-1611), merchant and local politician, born about 1544 in Mucklestone, Staffordshire, was the grandson of Thomas Ryther of Lynstead in Kent and the son of Thomas Ryther, or Ryder, of Mucklestone; his mother also came from Staffordshire. He was apprenticed to Thomas Burdet, a member of the Haberdashers' Company, of which he became free in 1569. He was a dealer in luxury cloths, and kept a shop in the Pawn of the Royal Exchange, the stock of which was valued at £3267 in 1592. Like many Londoners who prospered (Rider was already among the top 5 per cent of citizens in terms of his wealth by 1582), his business activities diversified. He became involved in the customs, holding the post of collector of the customs inwards from 1603 until 1610. From 1608 he enjoyed the lease of the imposts on sea coals as a member of a syndicate with Sir Thomas Bludder, John Trevor, and Marmaduke Darrell, and in the last year of his life he farmed the imposition on sugars with his son-in-law Sir Thomas Lake. He also speculated in crown lands, for example, by participating in a syndicate for the purchase and resale of £60,000-worth of lands in 1609.

For the early part of his career Rider lived in the parish of St Christopher-le-Stocks, but he seems to have moved into St Stephen Walbrook in 1599, and spent an increasing amount of time in Stepney. In 1609, shortly before his death, he inherited the manor of Leyton Grange in Low Leyton, Essex, from his financially embarrassed nephew and former apprentice, Edward Rider. He owned additional property at Greenwich, at Eythorne, and at the Mote near Maidstone in Kent, and also leased a manor at Dunmowe in Essex from the bishop of London. After serving the round of parish offices (collector for the poor in 1575–6 and churchwarden in 1580–81), he was elected to the common council for Cheapside ward in 1582. He was also active in the affairs of his livery company, serving as master on four occasions, the first in 1591. He was elected to the court of aldermen on 8 July 1591, and served successively in the wards of Bridge Without (1591–5) and Cornhill (1595–1611). His term as sheriff came in 1591–2, and he filled the office of lord mayor in 1600–01. As mayor Rider was remembered as a zealous reformer of weights and measures, seeking to establish uniform measures for sea coals, and becoming entangled in a protracted conflict with those who weighed the city's coal.

The most testing time of Rider's period of office came on Sunday 8 February 1601, when he was called from the sermon at Paul's Cross to deal with the irruption into the City of the earl of Essex at the head of about 140 followers, many of them of high rank. Essex probably planned to take the City and use it as a bargaining counter to remove his enemies from influence about the queen, but the rumours that twenty-one of the twenty-five aldermen would support him proved unfounded. Rider's strategy seems to have been to detach the earl from his followers by getting him indoors, either in his house or in that of the sheriff, Sir Thomas Smythe, and thereby giving the loyalist forces time to organize the defence of Whitehall and the City. The weeks which followed the revolt were tense, and Rider's energies were directed to surveillance and the pursuit of libellers against the now still more firmly entrenched Cecilian regime. He received the knighthood customarily given to the lord mayor in the early summer of 1601. For all the sympathy that the London élite and its favoured preachers had felt for the forward foreign policy with which Essex was associated, there was no way in which they could conceive of politics outside the framework of loyalty to the queen.

Rider's religious position seems to have been that of a conformist protestant, and there is little reason to connect him with the godly. He rebuilt the chancel of Leyton church, where he was buried. His largest charities were directed to the area where he had grown up. To the poor of Mucklestone he arranged for an annuity payable from property in Birchin Lane, London, while the inhabitants of Market Drayton were the beneficiaries of an annuity of £10 per annum to support their school for poor men's children, ‘to thend they maie by their good teaching come to be putt forth apprentices and soe become good members in the Comon wealthe’ (PRO, PROB11/118, fol. 281). Rider's bequests to charities were not, however, particularly large for a man of his wealth, and the bulk of his fortune passed to his two coheirs. He died at Leyton in September 1611, a few months after his wife, Elizabeth, the daughter of Richard Stone of Holme in Norfolk, whom he had married shortly before 1572. His funeral was celebrated on 19 November 1611 at St Olave, Hart Street, in the City. He was buried at Low Leyton church, where a monument to him was erected. The two daughters who survived him made good marriages—Mary (1575–1642) to Sir Thomas Lake in 1591 and Susanna (1577–1640) to the lawyer Thomas Caesar in 1593. On Rider's death the gossips noted that ‘he died a richer man than ever he was esteemed’, as Lake was allegedly the beneficiary through his wife of property valued at £20,000 (Letters of John Chamberlain, 1.316). Although it was Rider's intention to divide the property equally between his two daughters, they seem to have disputed the terms of the will.

Ian W. Archer
Sources
G. E. Cokayne, Some account of the lord mayors and sheriffs of the city of London during the first quarter of the seventeenth century, 1601–1625 (1897) · M. Benbow, ‘Index of London citizens involved in city government, 1558–1603’, U. Lond., Institute of Historical Research, Centre for Metropolitan History · A. B. Beaven, ed., The aldermen of the City of London, temp. Henry III–[1912], 2 vols. (1908–13) · R. G. Lang, ‘The greater merchants of London in the early seventeenth century’, DPhil diss., U. Oxf., 1963 · will, PRO, PROB 11/118, sig. 94; sentence PROB 11/124, sig. 119 · subsidy assessments, PRO · journals, CLRO, court of common council · repertories of the court of aldermen, CLRO · The letters of John Chamberlain, ed. N. E. McClure, 2 vols. (1939) · CSP dom. · A. Poval, The annals of the parishes of St Olave Hart Street and Allhallows Staining, in the City of London (1894)
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Ian W. Archer, ‘Rider , Sir William (c.1544-1611)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/24405, accessed 24 Sept 2005]
Sir William Rider (c.1544-1611): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/24405
.
     Grandson of Sir Thomas Ryther of Lynstead in Kent and son of Thomas Ryther or Ryder of Mucklestone, Staffordshire (his mother was a Poole of Staffordshire). Hosiery ... Knighted by Elizabeth I. He inherited the manor and lordship of Leyton, Essex from his brother Edward who died in 1609. Died at Leyton on 30 Aug 1611 but the St Olave register dated 19 Nov 1611 gives Sir William Rider dying at Leyton ... departed this church.... [exact copy required], his will mentions Mucklestone where he was born. Sir William Ryder Ryther was born circa 1544 in Mucklestone, Staffordshire. He was the son of Thomas Ryther and Catherine Poole.
     Sir William Ryder Ryther married Elizabeth Stone. She was the daughter of Richard Stone of Holme in Norfolk.
     ...this estate ... continued down to Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechworth castle, whose lands were disgavelledby the acts of the 1st and 8th years of queen Elizabeth. He in the 16th year of that reign, alienated it to Francis Santon, whose son in the 28th year of the same reign, sold it to Sir William Rither, of London, during whose time, anno 42 Elizabeth, an assise was held to prove by verdict, between Forth and his wife, late wife of Santon; and Rither, alderman of London, to find if these lands were gavelkind, on a writ of dower; when there were many rolls of the archbishop produced to prove they were held of the archbishop by knight's service, and a verdict was given accordingly for the plaintiffs. Sir William Rither gave it by will to Susan, one of his daughters and coheirs. Was Lord Mayor or Sheriff of London He was mentioned as Sheriff of London [Vicecomes de London] in 1591 in the pedigree attested by James Ryther of Harewood.
     William died on 30 August 1611 in Leyton, Essex. He was buried on 19 November 1611 in St Olave, Hart St, London. ‘Sir William Rider, diing at Leyton, had his funeralle solemnized in our church, the hearss being brought from Clothworkers' Hall.
     His will was proved on 2 December 1614 at the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. Sir William Rider, kt. alderman of London (another will with sentence 119 Lawe) dated Nov 1610 "of Mucklestone, where he was born". He left bequests to ‘Christe Churche Hospitall,’ to the prisoners in Ludgate, Newgate, and each of the compters, for the benefit of Drayton school in Shropshire, and to the poor of Low Leyton and of Mucklestone, where he was born. Among his estates he enumerates lands in Greenwich, Stepney, Leyton, Great Dunmow, and Eythorne Manor in Kent. The daughters disputed the terms of the will; though Sir William had obviously in- tended to divide his property equally, ‘as if there went but a payer of cheers betwene them.’.
     He may be the Robert Rither or Rider of Scarcroft in Yorkshire, Esq whose arms are mentioned in 1730 along with Thomas & William Rider, of Bethal Green in Middlesex.

Children of Sir William Ryder Ryther and Elizabeth Stone

Mary Rythers

(circa 1818 - )
     Mary Rythers was born circa 1818 in Burton Pidsea, Yorkshire, England.
     Mary Rythers and George Cuthbert obtained a marriage licence on 13 June 1839 in Burton Pidsea, Yorkshire.

Elizabeth Sadd

(circa 1680 - before 22 September 1707)
     Elizabeth Sadd was also known as Bultitout in records. She was born circa 1680 in Suffolk?.
     Elizabeth Sadd married William Bullett on 8 October 1702 in Eye, Suffolk. They may have had a son William who was buried 10 April 1706 at Eye.
     Elizabeth died before 22 September 1707 in Eye, Suffolk. She was buried on 22 September 1707 in Eye. Elizabeth Bultitout, wife of William.

Child of Elizabeth Sadd and William Bullett

Ann Sadler

     Ann Sadler was the daughter of William Sadler and Ann Wretham.

Barbara Sadler

     Barbara Sadler married William Trull, son of Patriarch Trull, on 9 May 1585 in Heacham, Norfolk, England.

William Sadler

     William Sadler married Ann Wretham, daughter of Edmund Wretham and Mildred Seaton.

Child of William Sadler and Ann Wretham

Elizabeth Sain(s) / Saim

(circa 1630 - )
     Elizabeth Sain(s) / Saim was born circa 1630 in Mousine, Essex, England. She was the daughter of Robert & Mary Saiyn? of Mousin in Essex.
     Elizabeth Sain(s) / Saim married Thomas Handy as his second wife, before 1651 in Ireland. Thomas Handy recorded in 1st page, took to wife, Elizabeth Saim, daughter of Robert & Mary Saim of Mousin [Moulsham?] in the county of Essex, by whom he had the following: Sarah, Thomas, John & Mary.

Children of Elizabeth Sain(s) / Saim and Thomas Handy

John Salisbury

     John Salisbury married Mary Bland, daughter of Richard Bland and Mary Pettit, in 1699 in St Mary, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.

Joan Sallatt

     Joan Sallatt married John Ryther (of Laleham) on 3 July 1569 in All Saints, Laleham, Middlesex, England.

Child of Joan Sallatt and John Ryther (of Laleham)

Elizabeth Sallett

     Elizabeth Sallett married Henry Ryther (of Laleham) on 9 October 1569 in All Saints, Laleham, Middlesex, England.

Children of Elizabeth Sallett and Henry Ryther (of Laleham)

Christey Salmon

(26 March 1797 - 28 May 1801)
     Christey Salmon was christened on 26 March 1797 in Gamston, Nottinghamshire. She was the daughter of William Salmon and Elizabeth Stanser.
     Christey died on 28 May 1801 in Nottinghamshire, aged 4.

George Salmon

(28 February 1794 - )
     George Salmon was christened on 28 February 1794 in Gamston, Nottinghamshire. He was the son of William Salmon and Elizabeth Stanser.

John Salmon

(8 May 1785 - )
     John Salmon was christened on 8 May 1785 in Gamston, Nottinghamshire. He was the son of William Salmon and Elizabeth Stanser.