David Edward Gillespie Wemyss

(21 February 1900 - before 3 June 1989)
     David Edward Gillespie Wemyss was born on 21 February 1900 in Sweden.
     David Edward Gillespie Wemyss married Edith Mary La Touche, daughter of Thomas Henry Digges La Touche and Anna Frances Handy, in 1924 in Cambridge RD, Cambridgeshire, England. Tjey had 3 sons..
     David Edward Gillespie Wemyss married secondly Avice Gertrude La Touche in 1930 in Brentford RD, Miiddlesex, England.
     David Edward Gillespie Wemyss married thirdly Lynette Nowelle La Touche in 1961 in Cambridge RD Cambridgeshire.
     David died before 3 June 1989. An obituary in the Daily telegraph on Saturday 3 June 1989, stated that he was one of the most decorated and successful U-boat killers of the 39-45 war.
He was appointed to the Navy Lt Commander Jan 1913 [!], appointed Commander 20 Jan 1916, He retired from the Navy on 21 Feb 1950..

John Wemyss

     John Wemyss married Eupheme Unknown (Wemyss) before 1566.

Mary Wemyss

(circa 1665 - 15 April 1771)
     Mary Wemyss was born circa 1665 in Danesfort, Kilkenny, Ireland.
     Mary Wemyss married James Agar, son of Charles Agar and Ellis Blanchville.
     Mary died on 15 April 1771 in Ringwood, Kilkenny, Ireland. Died. On Monday 15th inst. at Ringwood in this county, Mrs. Mary Agar, a widow aged 106 by whose death a jointure of £1,000 per ann. together with a great share of her personal fortune devolves to her grandson James Agar Esq. one of the Knights of the Shire for this county.

Children of Mary Wemyss and James Agar

Patrick Wemyss

     Patrick Wemyss married Ann Handcock, daughter of Sir William Handcock and Elizabeth Coddington, in 1702.

Unknown Wenlock 3rd Baron

( - 1912)
     Unknown Wenlock 3rd Baron married Constance Mary Lascelles Baroness Wenlock, daughter of Henry Thynne Lascelles 4th Earl of Harewood and Elizabeth Joan de Burgh, in 1872.
     Unknown died in 1912.

Alice Wensley

(before 1605? - 3 June 1634)
     Alice Wensley was born before 1605? In Lincolnshire, England.
     Alice Wensley married Robert Popplewell, son of James Popplewell and Elizabeth Broughton, on 30 November 1622 in Belton, Lincolnshire.
     Alice was buried on 3 June 1634 in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. Alice, wife of Rob'te Popplewell, joyner.

Child of Alice Wensley and Robert Popplewell

Ann Wentworth

(October 1627 - )
     Ann Wentworth was born in October 1627. She was the daughter of Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford and Arabella Holles.
     Ann Wentworth married Edward Watson 2nd Lord Rockingham.

Anna Maria Wentworth

     Anna Maria Wentworth was born in Hickleton, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Mr Wentworth of Hickleton. Yks diaries states that she was the daughter of Godfrey Wentworth of Wolley. She was the daughter of Godfrey Wentworth.
     Anna Maria Wentworth married Rev Edward Silvester, son of Edward Silvester and Mary Brattle or Battell, on 21 November 1726 in Hickleton, Yorkshire. John Hobson's diary records: Nov 16th,
At Barnsley. Mr Sylvester, of Burthwaite, was married the Monday before, at Hickelton, with Miss Wentworth, daughter of Mr Godfrey Wentworth, deceased, brother to the present Mr Wentworth, of Wooley.
She married secondly Mr Bold of Lancashire.
     Anna Maria Wentworth married Peter Bold as her second husband, on 4 May 1730 in St Stephen Walbrook & St Benet Sherehog, London. He was a well established and prosperous member of the Lancashire gentry. He owned a large estate at Bold, near St Helens, and was MP for Wigan.
     John Hobson's diary records: 29th
May 1730 Mr. Bold, of Lancashire, who has lately married the widow of Mr. Ed[ward] Silvester, brings her down to Burthwaite hall
.

Arabella Wentworth

(October 1630 - )
     Arabella Wentworth was born in October 1630. She married John McCarthy, Viscount Mountcashel. She was the daughter of Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford and Arabella Holles.

Edith Wentworth

(1845 - 8 January 1891)
     Edith Wentworth was born in 1845. She was the daughter of William Charles Wentworth, of Vaucluse, NSW & Sarah Cox.
     Edith Wentworth married Charles Gordon-Cumming Dunbar 9th Bart of Northfield, son of Sir Archibald Dunbar 7th Bart of Northfield and Sophia Orred, on 17 October 1872 in St Paul's, Knightsbridge, Middlesex, England.
     Charles was appointed Archdeacon of Grenada and left England in October 1875 but returned in 1877. He later became a preacher at the Tavistock chapel using his wife's money. In 1878 Edith left him and took legal action for a judicial separation and custody of her daughter. They went to court in February 1880. Beatrix went to Scotland with her grandparents as 'ransom' residing with them from 1880 to 1893..
     Edith died on 8 January 1891.

George Wentworth (of Woolley)

     George Wentworth (of Woolley) was the son of Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) and Ann Atkins or Atkinson.

Sir George Wentworth (of Woolley)

(circa 1600 - 18 October 1660)
     Sir George Wentworth (of Woolley) was born circa 1600.
     Sir George Wentworth (of Woolley) married Ann Fairfax, daughter of Sir Thomas Fairfax (1st Baron) and Ellen Aske, before October 1621.
     George died on 18 October 1660.

Godfrey Wentworth

     He was of Woolley and Hickleton and was succeeded by his grandson who took the name Wentworth.

Child of Godfrey Wentworth

Sir John Wentworth Baronet

     Sir John Wentworth Baronet married Catherine Finch, daughter of Sir Moyle Finch (Bt) and Countess Elizabeth Heneage.

Margaret Wentworth

(say 1633 - )
     Margaret Wentworth was born say 1633. She was the daughter of Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford and Elizabeth Rodes.

Thomas Wentworth

(1480 - 5 December 1548)
     Thomas Wentworth was born in 1480. He was the son of William Wentworth and Isabell FitzWilliam.
     Thomas Wentworth married Beatrice Woodroffe. She was the daughter of Sir Richard Woodroffe, kt.
     Thomas died on 5 December 1548.
     His will was proved on 27 November 1551.

Child of Thomas Wentworth and Beatrice Woodroffe

Thomas Wentworth

(1414 - 1463)
     Thomas Wentworth was born in 1414. He was the son of William Wentworth.
     Thomas Wentworth married Jane Redman, daughter of Richard Redman and Elizabeth de Aldeburgh. She was the daughter of Sir Richard Redman of Harwood, Kt.
     Thomas died in 1463 in North Elmsall, Kirby, Yorkshire.

Child of Thomas Wentworth and Jane Redman

Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford

(13 April 1593 - 12 May 1641)
     Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford was born on 13 April 1593 in Chancery Lane, London. He was the son of Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) and Ann Atkins or Atkinson.
     Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford married Margaret Clifford on 22 October 1611.
     Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford married secondly Arabella Holles on 24 February 1625.
     Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford married thirdly Elizabeth Rodes in October 1632. She was the daughter of Sir Godfrey and grand daughter of Francis Rodes.
     Thomas died being beheaded on 12 May 1641 in Tower Hill, London, aged 48.
     Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford (I593-1641), English statesman, son of Sir William Wentworth, of Wentworth Woodhouse, near Rotherham, a member of an ancient family long established there, and of Anne, daughter of Sir Robert Atkins of Stowell, Gloucestershire, was born on the 13th of April 1593, in London.
He was educated at St John’s College, Cambridge, was admitted a student of the Inner Temple in 1607, and in 1611 was knighted and married Margaret, daughter of Francis Clifford, 4th earl of Cumberland.
In 1614 he represented Yorkshire in the Addled Parliament, but, so far as is now known, it was not till the parliament of 1621, in which he sat for the same constituency, that he took part in the debates. His position towards the popular party was peculiar. He did not sympathize with their zeal for war with Spain, but James’s denial of the rights and privileges of parliament seems to have caused him to join in the vindication of the claims of the House of which he was a member, and he was a warm supporter of the protestation which drew’ down a sentence of dissolution upon the third parliament of James.
In 1622 Wentworth’s wife died, and in February 1625 he married Arabella Holles, daughter of the earl of Clare.
He was returned for Pontefract to the parliament of 1624, but appears to have taken no part in the proceedings. He had no sympathy with the popular outcry against Spain nor for wars undertaken for religious considerations to the neglect of the practical interests of th’e country. He desired also to avoid foreign complications and “do first the business of the commonwealth'. To the advances of Buckingham he replied coldly that he was ready to serve him as an honest man and a gentleman. In the first parliament of Charles I, June 1625, he again represented Yorkshire, and at once marked his hostility to the proposed war with Spain by supporting a motion for an adjournment before the house proceeded to business. He took part in the opposition to the demand made under the influence of Buckingham for war subsidies, and was consequently, after the dissolution in November, made sheriff of Yorkshire, in order to exclude him from the parliament which met in 1626. Yet he had never taken up an attitude of antagonism to the king. His position was very different from that of the regular opposition. He was anxious to serve the Crown, but he disapproved of the king’s policy. In January 1626 he had asked for the presidency of the council of the North, and had visited and been favourably received by Buckingham. But after the dissolution of the parliament he was dismissed from the justiceship of the peace and the office of custos rotulorum of Yorkshire, to which he had been appointed in 1615, as the result probably of his resolution not to support the court in its design to force the country to contribute money without a parliamentary grant. At all events he refused in 1627 to contribute to the forced loan, and was imprisoned in consequence.
Wentworth’s position in the parliament of 1628 was a striking one. He joined the popular leaders in resistance to arbitrary taxation and imprisonment, but he tried to obtain his end with the least possible infringement of the prerogative of the Crown, to which he looked as a reserve force in times of crisis. With the approbation of the House he led the movement for a bill which would have secured the liberties of the subject as completely as the Petition of Right afterwards did, but in a manner less offensive to the king. The proposal was wrecked between the uncompromising demands of the parliamentary party who would give nothing to the prerogative and Charles’s refusal to make the necessary concessions, and the leadership was thus snatched from Wentworth’s hands by Eliot and Coke. Later in the session he fell into conflict with Eliot, as, though he supported the Petition of Right in substance, he was anxious to come to a compromise with the Lords, so as to leave room to the king to act unchecked in special emergencies.
On the 22nd of July 1628, not long after the prorogation, Wentworth was created Baron Wentworth, and received a promise of the presidentship of the Council of the North at the next vacancy. This implied no change of principle whatever. He was now at variance with the parliamentary party on two great subjects of policy, disapproving both of the intention of parliament to seize the powers of the executive and also its inclination. towards puritanism. When once the breach was made it naturally grew wider, partly from the engrossing energy which each party put into its work, and partly from the personal animosities which of necessity arose. Such and no other was the nature of Wentworth’s so-called “apostacy".
As yet Wentworth took no part in the general government of the country. In December he became Viscount Wentworth and president of the Council of the North. In the speech delivered at York on his taking office ise announced his intention, almost in the words of Bacon, of doing his utmost to bind up the prerogative of the Crown and the liberties of the subject in indistinguishable union. “Whoever,” he said, “ravels forth into questions the right of a king and of a people shall never be able to wrap them, up again into the comeliness and order he found them". His government here was characterized by the same feature which afterwards marked his administration in Ireland and which it was the gravest charge in his impeachment that he intended to introduce into the whole English administration, namely the attempt to centralize all power with the executive at the expense of the individual in defiance of those constitutional liberties which ran counter to and impeded this policy.
The session of 1629 ended in a breach between the King and the parliament which made the task of a moderator hopeless. Wentworth had to choose between helping a Puritan House of Common’s to dominate the king and helping the king to dominate a Puritan House of Commons. He instinctively chose the latter course, and he threw himself into the work of repression. with characteristic energy, as if the establishment of the royal power was the one thing needful. Yet even when he was most resolute in crushing resistance he held that he and not his antagonists were maintaining the old constitution, which they had attempted to alter by claiming supremacy for parliament.
In November 1629 Wentworth became a privy councillor. In October 1631 he lost his second wife, and in October 1632 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Godfrey Rhodes. In January 1632 he had been named lord-deputy of Ireland, and arrived in Dublin in July 1633.
Here he had to deal with a people who had not arrived at national cohesion, and amongst whom English colonists had been from time to time introduced, some of them, like the early Norman settlers, being Roman Catholics, whilst the later importations stood aloof and preserved their Protestantism. In his government here he showed the most remarkable abilities as a ruler. The lord deputy of Ireland, wrote Sir Thomas Roe to the queen of Bohemia, “doth great wonders and governs like a king, and bath taught that kingdom to show us an example of envy, by having parliaments and knowing wisely how to use them.” He reformed the administration, getting rid summarily of the inefficient English officials. He succeeded in. so manipulating tile parliaments that he obtained the necessary grants, and secured their co-operation in various useful legislative enactments. He set on foot a new victualling trade with Spain, established or promoted the linen manufacture, and encouraged the development of the resources of the country in many directions. The customs rose from a little over £25,000 in 1633—1634 to £57,000 in 1637—1638. He raised an army. He swept the pirates from the seas. He reformed and instilled life into the Church and rescued church property. His strong and even administration broke down the tyranny of the great men over the poor. Such was the government of “Thorough,” as Strafford expresses it. Yet these good measures were all carried out by arbitrary methods which diminished their usefulness and their stability. Their aim moreover was not the prosperity of the Irish community but the benefit to the English exchequer, and Strafford suppressed the trade in cloth “lest it should be a means to prejudice that staple commodity of England.” Extraordinary acts of despotism took place, as in the case of Esmond, Lord Chancellor Loftus and Lord Mountnorris, the last of whom Strafford caused to be sentenced to death
Strafford’s Report of 1636. Cat. of Stale Papers; Irish, 7633— 1647, p. 134.

Strafford, Thomas Wentworth, 1st earl of, 1593–1641, English statesman. Regularly elected to Parliament from 1614 on, he became one of the critics of George Villiers, 1st duke of Buckingham, and of the war with Spain. Charles I made him sheriff of Yorkshire in order to exclude him from the Parliament of 1626, but Wentworth continued his opposition and was imprisoned (1627) for refusing to pay the forced loan. In the Parliament of 1628 he advocated a moderate version of the Petition of Right, but when Sir John Eliot and Sir Edward Coke succeeded in carrying their more severe form of the petition, he lost influence. At this point Charles sought his adherence by creating him baron and viscount and president of the council of the north (1628), and Wentworth realigned himself as a firm supporter of royal prerogative. With William Laud, Wentworth evolved the policy known as “Thorough” to achieve an absolutist but just and efficient regime. As lord deputy of Ireland (1632–40) he systematically applied this policy. He cleared the sea of pirates, bolstered trade and industry (always with an eye to England's interest), began a reorganization of the church in Ireland, and enforced reforms in financial administration that doubled the state's revenue. However, his methods were ruthlessly despotic, and he aroused even more fear and hatred. After Charles I's humiliation by the Scots in the first Bishops' War, Wentworth was recalled (1639) to England to become the king's chief adviser. Created earl of Strafford in 1640, he obtained money from the Irish Parliament to raise Irish troops to fight the Scots, but he was unable to get a similar grant of supplies from the Short Parliament (summoned on his advice) in England. An English army of sorts was mustered and placed under Strafford's command, but it was easily defeated by the Scots in a second war. When the Long Parliament assembled (1640), it suspected that Strafford had intended to use Irish troops against the king's English opponents (although in fact the Irish army had never materialized). Impeachment proceedings were begun, but Strafford defended himself so ably that the opposition changed its tactics and introduced a legislative enactment of guilt, a bill of attainder, against him. The bill was finally passed in the panic following the discovery of the so-called army plot, by which the king had hoped to rescue Strafford and dissolve the Parliament. After anguished hesitation, Charles signed the bill, and Strafford was beheaded.
See biography by C. V. Wedgwood (1961); H. F. Kearney, Strafford in Ireland (1989).
STRAFFORD, EARLS OF. The first earl of Strafford was Charles I. ‘s friend and adviser, Thomas Wentworth (see below), When he was attainted and executed in May 1641 his honours were forfeited, but later in the year his only son, William (1626-1695), was created earl of Strafford, his father’s attainder being reversed by act of parliament in 1662. William died without issue on the 16th of October 1695, when all his titles except the barony of Raby, became extinct. His estates passed to a kinsman, Thomas Watson, afterwards Watson-Wentworth (d. 1723), a son of Anne (1629—1695), daughter of the 1st earl, and her husband Edward Watson, 2nd Baron. Rockingham
.

Children of Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford and Arabella Holles

Child of Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford and Elizabeth Rodes

Thomas Wentworth Esq

(circa 1529 - 14 February 1586/87)
     Thomas Wentworth Esq was born circa 1529 in Wentworth Woodhouse, Yorkshire. He was the son of William Wentworth and Catherine Beeston.
     He attended Trinity Hall, Cambridge from 1548. He was a JP in the West Riding.
     Thomas Wentworth Esq married Margaret Gascoigne, daughter of William Gascoigne and Beatrix Tempest, circa 1557. He acquired Gawthorpe and a claim to two baronetcies via his wife.
She may have married secondly Sir James Harrington.
     Archbishop Sandys' wrote "A very senseless blockhead, ever wringing and wronging his poor neighbours. Being a graineman of himself, he bought in the beginning of the last year in every Market so much as he could, and heaped it up in his souses to sell again at the dearest. He dependeth wholly upon him that brought him in, and will serve all tournes. If you look at the Subsidy book, your Lordship shall find him little there" In his covering letter the archbishop notes that "none should be in the Commission but such as are £20 in subsidy".
     Thomas Wentworth Esq and Margaret Gascoigne were mentioned in a deed dated _Hilary term_ ___ 1568/69. 1. Thomas Gargrave, kt, Peter Fretchwell, esq and John Jackson, gent - 2. Francis Gascoigne, esq., and Ann his wife and Thomas Went worthe de Wentworthe, esq., and Margaret his wife; re: Manor of Thorpearche, and 40 messuages, 3 watermills, and a fulling mill with lands in Thorpearche, Halle Parke, Halle Feildes, and Walton, and free fishing in the Wharff. Copied From: 'Yorkshire Fines: 1569', Feet of Fines of the Tudor period (Yorks): part 1: 1486-1571 (1887), pp. 364-368. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49644 Date accessed: 26 July 2009.
     Exchequer records at the National Archives show: John Layke v. Thos. Wentworth and Margaret his wife, sole daughter and heir of Wm Gascoigne, deceased.: Mills of H.M., called Harwoode, Gawthorppe, the manor of Gawthorpe. Customs of tenants of same. Manor held of the honor of Pomfrett.: York Covering dates 22 Eliz 1579.
     James Ryther, in common with other landowners of the day, was seeking to turn to his own advantage the legislation which favoured the enclosure of waste land. Litigation records show that in the course of 1579-1580 Ryther bought a case relating to common rights against one Robert Hopwood and others before the Star Chamber. Only Ryther's Bill of complaint survives, but Hopwood's name occurs again the next case and the two may be part of a single episode. The second case reputed in August 1580, sparked off by Ryther's enclosing "one parcel of ground lately called the Long Wood and now called the Spring'. In that month Thomas Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse, husband of Margaret Gascoigne, heiress to the manor of Gawthorpe which adjoined Harewood, supported by Robert Hopwood and 25 others assembled "in riotous manner" and pulled or cut down Ryther's enclosing hedge and turned their cattle into the place. Ryther brought proceedings, which lasted from June 1581 to September 1582, but the results are unclear.
     Thomas Wentworth won a defamation case against James Ryther between Jan & August 1582.
     Thomas was High Sheriff in Yorkshire, in 1582/83.
     Thomas died on 14 February 1586/87 in Wentworth, Yorkshire. He was buried in Wentworth.

Child of Thomas Wentworth Esq and Margaret Gascoigne

Thomas Wentworth Lord Raby, 3rd/1st Earl of Strafford

(17 September 1672 - 15 November 1739)
     Thomas Wentworth Lord Raby, 3rd/1st Earl of Strafford was christened on 17 September 1672 in Wakefield, Yorkshire. He was the second but first surviving son of Sir William Wentworth of Northgate Head, Wakefield. His mother was Isabella Apsley, who died 1733. He claimed to have been born at Stanley Hall, Wakefield. He was the son of Sir William Wentworth and Isabella Apsley.
     He purchased the estate of Sir Gervase Cutler at Stainborough in 1708 and built Wentworth Castle.
The barony of Raby passed to the 2nd earl’s cousin, Thomas Wentworth (1672-1739), son and heir of Sir William Wentworth of Northgate Head, Wakefield. In early life he saw much service as a soldier in the Low Countries, and was occasionally employed on diplomatic errands. From 1711 to 1714 he was British ambassador at the Hague, and in 1711 he was created earl of Strafford. The earl was one of the British representatives at the congress of IJtrecht, and in 1715 he was impeached for his share in concluding this treaty, but the charges against him were not pressed to a conclusion. He died on the 15th of November 1739. The earldom became extinct when Frederick Thomas, the 5th earl, died in August 1799. William, the 4th earl (1722—1791), had a sister Anne, who married William Connolly; and one of their daughters, Anne, married George Byng (d. 1789) of Wrotham Park, Middlesex. Their son, Sir John Byng (1772—1860), a distinguished soldier, was created earl of Strafford and Viscount Enfield in 1847. Having entered the army in 1793, Byng served in Flanders and commanded a brigade during the Peninsular War. He was present at Waterloo and became a field marshal in 1855. The earldom of Strafford is still held by his descendants.
.
     Thomas Wentworth Lord Raby, 3rd/1st Earl of Strafford lived at Wentworth Castle, Stainborough, Yorkshire. It was previously known as Stainborough Hall. Thomas He was created Earl of Strafford in 1711.
     Thomas Wentworth Lord Raby, 3rd/1st Earl of Strafford married Anne Johnson on 6 September 1711?.
     Thomas died on 15 November 1739 in Stainborough, Yorkshire, aged 67. He was buried on 2 December 1739 in Toddington.

Child of Thomas Wentworth Lord Raby, 3rd/1st Earl of Strafford and Anne Johnson

William Wentworth

(say 1490 - 4 July 1549)
     John Ravilious provided a detailed account of this family on GenMedieval mailing list. William Wentworth was born say 1490 in Wentworth Woodhouse, Yorkshire. He was the son of Thomas Wentworth and Beatrice Woodroffe.
     William Wentworth married Catherine Beeston say 1528. She was the daughter of Ralph Beeston of Beeston.
     William died on 4 July 1549.

Child of William Wentworth and Catherine Beeston

William Wentworth

( - 8 January 1508)
     William Wentworth was the son of Thomas Wentworth and Jane Redman.
     William Wentworth married Isabell FitzWilliam. She was the daughter of Sir Richard Fitzwilliam of Aldwarke.
     William died on 8 January 1508.

Child of William Wentworth and Isabell FitzWilliam

William Wentworth

(1396 - )
     William Wentworth was born in 1396 See the Visitation of Yorkshire for his ancestry.

Child of William Wentworth

Sir William Wentworth

( - 2 July 1644)
     Sir William Wentworth was the son of Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) and Ann Atkins or Atkinson.
     Sir William Wentworth lived at Ashby Puerorum, Lincolnshire.
     Sir William Wentworth married Unknown Savile.
     William died on 2 July 1644 in the battle of Marston Moor.

Child of Sir William Wentworth

Sir William Wentworth

(before 1644 - 1692)
     Sir William Wentworth was born before 1644. He was the son of Sir William Wentworth.
     Sir William Wentworth married Isabella Apsley circa 9 February 1666 in Yorkshire. She was the daughter of Sir Allen Apsley, treasurer to the household of James, Duke of York.
     Sir William Wentworth lived at Northgate Head, Wakefield, Yorkshire.
     William died in 1692.

Child of Sir William Wentworth and Isabella Apsley

Sir William Wentworth (Baronet)

(3 July 1562 - before 10 September 1614)
     In"Sir William Wentworth's volume" he described his father's neighbours the Rythers. He owned Gawthorpe Hall [via his mother]. He may have attended St John's College, Cambridge in 1576, possibly also attending Gray's Inn from 1579. In the late 1590s he endured lengthy litigation over his estates, emerging only partially successful; but he had recovered his position by 1601 and bought a baronetcy in June 1611. He and his wife were strict Protestants, renowned for their devotion and learning, and he was remembered by his son as both ambitious and methodical. Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) was christened on 3 July 1562 in Wentworth, Yorkshire. It may have been the 30th.. He was the son of Thomas Wentworth Esq and Margaret Gascoigne.
     Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) married Ann Atkins or Atkinson.
In 1599/0 Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) purchased property in Harewood, in 1599/0. Hilary Term:A fine between Robt Chamberlain esq., John Gregory esq. & Henry Atkinson esq. and deforciants Henry Earl of Kent, John Piggott, esq., John Leighfield, Sac Theo, bach., Robert Rither esq., Edith Rither, Mary Rither, Helena Rither, Robert Stapleton kt., Wm Middleton, esq., Henry Bellasses esq., Robert Oglethorpe gent., William Oglethorpe his son & heir apparent, & Ralph Conyston. Re The castle & manor of Harewood & 30 messuages and 30 cottages with lands and the frankpledge in Harwood, Bondgate, Newhall, Stocton, Lofthouse, Hetherick, Gawthorpe als. Gawckthorpe, Stubhouse, Allwoodley, Wike, Brandon, Eastkeswick, Weardley, Dunkeswick, Helthwaite Hill, Weton, Hewby, Newby, Wescohill, Stainburne, Westrighton, Carleton, Swindon, Kirkby Overblowes, and Kereby, and free fishing in the Wharfe. A warrant against James Rither, father [son of] of William Rither, the grandfather of Robert, Edith, Mary & Helena, and against Matthew & William Redman.
He is supposed to have sold Harewood to Sir William Wentworth in 1601 - Sir William Wentworth described 'Mr Robert Ryther, being a young man, greatly indebted for his father and something for himself, resolved to sell Harewood, suing therein the especial consel and confidence of the Countess of Cumberland and Sir Robert Stapleton, both of them persons much experienced and very politique ....'.
     In 1607 he wrote: Then it pleased God to give me an opportunity to buy Harwod.... The house of Harwod Castle, being for many years divided betwixt the Redmans and the Rythers was at last by James Ryther's policies and purchase untied in himself. But his proud overweening condition, albeit he had especial good gifts of nature, brought him to die in the Fleet for debt and his son Robert Ryther to sell all his inheritance. These Rithers and Redmans being men of great worship and courage, albeit they had some times married with the house of Gawthorp, could never remain in firm friendship with it. For they claimed to be lords of Harwod, as indeed it seems they were and the Gascoignes they held for freeholders, who claimed to have a manor in Gawthorp or Lofthouse etc. But the Gascoignes being ever too mighty for them bore them very hard, both with suits, quarrels and countenance. Diverse great men, knights and earls, made awards betwixt them, but the settled rancour of their hearts and remembrance of old displeasures would never suffer long agreement.
At last ... after the death of my mother I came to be the inheritor of the house of Gawthorpe. At which time Mr Robert Ryther, being a young man, greatly indebted for this father and something for himself, resolved to sell Harwood, suing therin the especial counsel and confidence of the Countess of Cumberland and Sir Robert Stapleton, both of them persons much experienced and very politic and remaining for the most part at London, it was offered to diverse great persons, but the price was beyond the measure and the encumbrances dangerous and almost without number, as will appear by my evidence. [After selling lands to the value of 400 pounds? p.a. he] raised money to purchase Harwood.
. William was created Baron in 1611.
     William died before 10 September 1614. He was buried on 10 September 1614 in Wentworth Woodhouse. 1641 on Wentworth village website.

Children of Sir William Wentworth (Baronet) and Ann Atkins or Atkinson

William Wentworth 4th/2nd Earl of Strafford

( - 1791)
     William Wentworth 4th/2nd Earl of Strafford was the son of Thomas Wentworth Lord Raby, 3rd/1st Earl of Strafford and Anne Johnson.
     William died in 1791. He married Lady Anne Campbell but died without issue.

William Wentworth Earl of Strafford

(8 June 1626 - 16 October 1695)
     William Wentworth Earl of Strafford was born on 8 June 1626 in Wentworth Woodhouse, Yorkshire. He was the son of Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford and Arabella Holles. William As his fathers honours were forfeited by attainder, he received them all by a fresh grant from Charles I on 1 Dec 1641 on 1 December 1641.
     The second Earl sold Harewood to Sir John Cutler in 1657 (by then the castle was ruinous) and it was later bought by Henry Lascelles.
William was created earl of Strafford, his father’s attainder being reversed by act of parliament in 1662. William died without issue on the 16th of October 1695, when all his titles except the barony of Raby, became extinct. His estates passed to a kinsman, Thomas Watson, afterwards Watson-Wentworth (d. 1723), a son of Anne (1629—1695), daughter of the 1st earl, and her husband Edward Watson, 2nd Baron. Rockingham. In 1746 Watson-Wentworth’s son, Thomas Watson-Wentworth (c. 1690— 1750), was created marquess of Rockingham, and when his son Charles, the 2nd marquess, died in 1782, the estates passed to his maternal nephew, William Fitzwilliam, 2nd Earl Fitzwilliarn (1748-1833). His descendant, the present Earl Fitzwilliam, is the owner of Wentworth Woodhouse, near Rotherham, and the representative of the Wentworth family.
The barony of Raby passed to the 2nd earl’s cousin, Thomas Wentworth (1672-1739), son and heir of Sir William Wentworth of Northgate Head, Wakefield. In early life he saw much service as a soldier in the Low Countries, and was occasionally employed on diplomatic errands. From 1711 to 1714 he was British ambassador at the Hague, and in. 1711 he was created earl of Strafford. The earl was one of the British representatives at the congress of Utrecht, and in 1715 he was impeached for his share in concluding this treaty, but the charges against him were not pressed to a conclusion. He died on the 15th of November 1739. The earldom became extinct when Frederick Thomas, the 5th earl, died in August 1799. William, the 4th earl (1722-1791), had a sister Anne, who married William Connolly; and one of their daughters, Anne, married George Byng (d. 1789) of Wrotham Park, Middlesex. Their son, Sir John Byng (1772-1860), a distinguished soldier, was created earl of Strafford and Viscount Enfield in 1847. Having entered the army in 1793, Byng served in Flanders and commanded a brigade during the Peninsular War. He was present at Waterloo and became a field marshal in 1855. The earldom of Strafford is still held by his descendants
. William When parliament reversed his father's attainder, William (already first Earl of Strafford by the second creation) became second earl of the first creation in succession to his father in 1662.
     William died on 16 October 1695 aged 69. He married (twice?) but died without issue. His estates descended to his daughter Anne, who married Edward Watson, second Lord Rockingham. His titles died with him except for the Barony of Raby which descended to his nephew once removed Thomas who was created Earl of Strafford on 4 Sep 1711.

Edward Wepham

     Edward Wepham married Dorothy Marlott, daughter of Thomas Marlott and Dorothy Stapley, on 14 July 1622 in Pulborough, Sussex.

Thomas Bouville Were

     Thomas Bouville Were married Sarah Kennet, daughter of Benjamin Kennet and Catherine Steer, in October 1836 in Sidmouth, Devon. Tuesday week at Sidmouth, Thomas Bouville Were, esquire, of Clifton near Bristol, to Sarah, second daughter of the late Benjamin Kennet Dawson, esq, formerly of Wakefield.