John Dunbar

( - 30 November 1718)
     John was buried on 30 November 1718 in St Paul, Dublin.

Capt John Dunbar

(say 1720 - before 13 August 1764)
     Capt John Dunbar was born say 1720.
Capt John Dunbar married Eleanor Stafford before 1740.
     John died before 13 August 1764 in on Aston's Quay, Dublin, Ireland. Faulkner's Dublin Journal reported18 August 1764: On Aston's Quay, Captain Dunbar". However Rosemary fflolloitts index gives: Aug 13, John Dunbarr, soldier's child! - Dublin, St Paul, Burials. He was buried on 13 August 1764 in St Paul, Dublin. John Dunbarr, soldier's child!
     His will was proved on 12 November 1764 at the Prerogative Court of Armagh, Ireland. His will mentions his wife Eleanor Stafford, son Isaac Hayes Dunbar & his wife Mary & children Arthur & Anne.

Child of Capt John Dunbar and Eleanor Stafford

Major John Dunbar

(circa 1675 - after 27 May 1724)
     Major John Dunbar was born circa 1675 in Fermanagh, Ireland. He was the son of Major John Dunbar and Catherine Wynne.
     He served as an Army officer. The original pedigree attestation says that Ann Killigrew married John Dunbar "a major in the Carbineers Oct 1724 & 3rd major of the Dunbar family ... Aide de camp to Marlborough. Received Lord Derwentwater's sword at Preston [1715]. Will dated 27 May 1724".
     He defended castle Carlow against James II & the rebels, & William III (1689-1702) granted him an estate there (Ballycarney) which was sold by his son George in 1767. Co. Carlow, townland Ballycarney, parish of Ballinacarrig (otherwise known as Staplestown, 1 mile from Carlow).
An annotation in the TCD records shows him as MP for Old Leighlin in 1692-3.
There is confusion over the Army records - probably two Major Johns - one during the Jacobite uprisings - Battle of the Boyne etc. & Garrison and then his son?'s overseas deeds with Marlborough. History of the 3rd Carabiniers - 1691 Irish campaign, 9th Horse became the Carabiniers with Marlborough.
"1704 Blenheim Roll": Major-General Ross' Regt of Dragoons: Cornet Jno Dunbar received £24.0.0. Footnote states that he was appointed Capt-Lieut of Col. Owen Wynne's newly raised Regiment of Foot, 25 Mar 1706. Capt same date. Major 15 Oct 1711. Appointed Major of Maj-Gen Owen Wynne's newly raised Regt of Dragoons (9th Lancers) in 1715. [Dalton p.27-28].
Col. Owen Wynne's newly raised Regt of Foot 25 March 1705: Liueuts John Dunbar Capt.Lt. Supplentary commissions: John Dunbar to be Capt. vice Tho. Brereton, Fras Cocksedge to be Ens. to Capt Jno Dunbar . The Regiment was sent to Ireland in 1706, served at the siege of Douay in 1710. Disbanded in England 21 July 1713, and the officers placed on half pay. Footnote states that he married Catherine Wynne, sister to Brigdr. Gen. Owen Wynne.. Promoted Capt 25 March 1705, Major 15 Oct 1711. Placed on half pay in 1713. Appointed Major of Maj.Gen Owen Wynne's Regt of Dragoons 22 July 1715. On half pay in[ 1722. [Dalton, English army lists and commission registers 1703-1706 p.184-5].
Dalton - Vol. 6 (1707-1714) p.241: Major John Dunbar. Brig. Gen. Owen Wynne's Regt of Foot (disbanded 1713, went to Flanders 1708, siege at Douay 1710). John Dunbar to be major 15 Oct 1711.
Dalton, Geo I's army 1714-1727, 1910 p.113: Gen. Wynn's Regiment of Dragoons (9th Dragoons) - John Dunbarr major & captain. Footnote - This officer married Catherine Wynne, sister to Maj. Gen Owen Wynne. Appointed Major of Major General Owen Wynne's new regiment of Dragoons (9th Lancers) 22 July 1715. On half pay in 1722. [Note that Catherine Wynne/Dunbar was a widow in 1721 and probably widowed by 1712!].
Lancashire memorials of the rebellion 1715, Chetham Society v.5, 1845: Monday morning 14 Nov 1715 the Earl of Derwentwater surrendered the said town and he and all his men ... were made prisoners of war. Earl of Derwentwater & Col. Mackintosh came forward and surrendered themselves to Col. Churchill, 13 Nov. ... Col. Churchill sent by Carpenter into Preston to receive the hostages. [p.143]
.
Major John Dunbar served in the military in 1705. To his Grace the Duke of Marlebrough. Capt John Dunbar memorial.
Humbly Rep...
That he served in Flanders the first three years of this war having been a Cornet in the Royal Irish Dragoons .... and has had a Company in Maj General Wynnes Regiment ever siince it was raised where he is eldest Capt [crossed out]. That he served as Major of Brigade from the beginning of the campaign in the Isle of Wight & the ... ecpedition under Lieut General Earle till the time that the five British regiments were ordered from Ostend to Antwerp where he continued to act in the same station & afterwards to the British Battalions in Lisle. That he would have applied to Lieut General Earle for a Commission as Major of Brigade but that he supposed a commission from the Queen had been taken out for him at the same time as had been for Major Nuttell of Brigadier Lucy's Regiment who was a younger officer and to a younger brigade.
That being informed that those Reiments are to be Brigaded & take the field this year he humbly .. your consideration
.
Major John Dunbar was a petitioner to the Duke of Marlborough circa 1708. To his Grace the Duke of Marlbrough [sic], Capt John Dunbar memorial: Humbly rep..sent. That he served in Flanders the first three years of this war having been a cornet in the Royal Irish Dragoons, [inserted above] that he is ... had has held a Company in Major General Wynne's Regt ever since it was raised where he is eldest Captain [the latter phrase crossed out]. That he served as Major of Brigade from the beginning of the Incampment in the Isle of Wight (the late expedition under Lieut General Earle) till the time tha the five British regiments were ordered from Ostend to Antwerp where he continued to act in the same station & afterwards to the British Battalion in Lisle. That he would have applied to Lieut General Earle for a commission as Major of Brigade but that he supposed that a commission from the Queen had been taken out for him, at the same time as that for Major Nuttell of Brigadier Lucy's Regiments (who was a younger officer & to a younger brigade).
That he being now informed that those Regiments are to be Brigaded & take the field this year he humbly prays that your Grace to take his p~tentions into your consideration and to order him a commission accordingly.

Verso: A copy of Major Jno Dunbar's memorial. Undated but internal evidence suggests about 1708.
A copy of a letter from the Duke of Marlborough to the Secretary at War: 8th July 1716 Sir, You know that I was always for Major Dunbar being raised when the vacancy happened. He is a brave man, behaved well at Preston, and if after so many years' service he cannot be advanced in his own Regiment, what hopes has he of ever being better? I hope you will take care that he has his right, which will oblige, Sir, yr most faithfull, humble servant, Marlborough. The original letter was in the possession of General Sir John Doyle, Bart, in 1827, it was supposed to be in the War Office, Pall Mall.
This letter is supposed to have been written to the Secretary of State and obtained a colonelcy for Maj Dunbar who died the morning he was gazetted. Many years afterwards in 1825 or 6, on my grandfather's ruin, General Sir John Doyle shewed the above letter to the Duke of Yorlk who immediately gazetted my uncles Charles and Frederick as ensigns in the 87th (Doyle's Regiment). E H V Dunbar
According to the original attested pedigree, it obtained Major John a Colonelcy, but the morning he was gazetted, he died.
     A marriage settlement between Major John Dunbar and Anne Killigrew was made on 20 May 1718. Extract from the pre-niptial marriage settlement of Major John Dunbar and Ann Killigrew, dated May 20, 1718. ... and whereas the said Anne Killigrew is also seized in fee to her and her heirs of & in several lands and tenements herinafter mentioned to be lying & situate in the said county of Cornwall, and whereas the said John Dunbar is likewise seized in fee of the manor, town & lands of Kilcoe, situate, lying and being in the county of Fermanagh , Upper and Lower Ballicarey in Catherloch [Ballycarney, Carlow]; Prisloe in Budock. The trustees to said settlement were, Sir William Twysden, Martin Killigrew, Owen Wynne and Walter Weldon. Witnesses, Francis Errisey, John Hamilton, Thomas Wilson.
Major John Dunbar married Anne Killigrew, daughter of George Killigrew and Ann St Aubyn, on 27 May 1718 in St Mildred, Bread Street, London, England. They were both of St James, Westminster.
     Major John Dunbar was party to a land transaction on 30 March 1721 in Dublin. Memorial of deeds of lease and release the last day of March and the first day of April 1721 between John Dunbar of the city of Dublin, esq. of the one part and Frances Cocksedge of Dublin, esq. of the other part the said release reciting that the ... Earl of Thomond by a deed of fee farm dated the 26th September 1712 did grant release and confirm unto Katherine Dunbar, widow, mother of the said John Dunbar, all those the lands of Quinagh with these ... epirnation?? 370 acres more or less, in the parish of Ballinacarrig Barony of Catherlogh, County of Catherlogh To hold unto the said Katherine Dunbar her heirs and assigns for ever all and under the yearly free farm rent of forty six pounds with several ... That the right and ... the said John Dunbar by which said release the said John Dunbar ... in consideration of five hundred pounds to him paid by the said Francis Cocksedge did grant release and confirm ... Francis Cocksedge all that the afsd ... and and the bog with the appurtenances to hold ... said Francis Cocksedge his heirs and assigns forever and under the said free farm rent duly and covenents in the said free farme deed ... which said deed of release is contained ... whereby ... declared to be void on payment of the said sum of five hundred pounds and intrest in manner herein mentioned which ... of lease and release are witnessed by James Ramsey of Dublin, peruke maker John Coyle servt to the said John Dunbar and Henry Buckley of the same city of Dublin, notary public. Jo Dunbar signed and sealed in the presence of .. John Coyle. John .... The above named Henry Buckley maketh oath ... and release for which he .. duly perfected by the above named John Dunbar ... said John Dunbar duly signed and sealed ... said ... he This Dep ... Henry Buckley. Registered the ... 4 o'clock in the afternoon..
     Major John Dunbar made a will dated 27 May 1724 in Ballycarney, Ballinacarrig or Staplestown, Carlow, Ireland. The will of John Dunbar of Ballycarney co. Carlow, Esq. dated 27 May 1724, proved 20 July 1724, mentions his mother Catherine, sister Elizabeth, son George, sisters Ann Turner, Katherine Milley, Elizabeth D... Dunbar?, wife Anne, uncle Walter Weldon. These documents confirm that his father is dead yet George is granted administration of his grandfather John Dunbar of Carlow's estate on 14 July 1764 (possibly on the death of his grandmother), A John Dunbar was buried at St Paul's church, Dublin on 13 August 1764,vur described as a soldeier's child.
     John died after 27 May 1724 in Dublin, Ireland. But a John Dunbarr was buried 30 Jun? 1723 at St Catherine's. [A John Dunbarr was buried at St Paul's church, Dublin on 13 August 1764 which matches deeds but appears to be Capt John D, husband of Eleanor,but also desceibed as soldier's child by R ffolliott]..
     His will was proved on 20 July 1724 at the Prerogative Court of Armagh, Ireland. Dunbar, John, of Ballycarney, co. Carlow, Esquire, 1724. Probate of John D's will (his father?) dated 27 May 1724. So George was 6-8 years old, his mother also lost her father at an early age. Probably brought up with his grandmother (at Balleycarney, Carlow) as executor of their wills.

Child of Major John Dunbar and Anne Killigrew

Major John Dunbar

(say 1600 - 1657)
     Major John Dunbar was born say 1600 in Scotland?. He was described as the second son in the 1674/88 Chancery bill. He was the son of Sir John Dunbar and Katherine Graham.
Major John Dunbar married Mary Harman, daughter of Henry Harman and Marie Hamilton?, say 1630 in Ireland.
     He served as an officer in the English forces in the 1641-42 rebellion in Ireland. 1641-2 Orders & warrants to Vice Treasurer & General receiver in Ireland. 10 Dec 1641 £44/14/3 each to Capt Abraham Rickeses and Capt John Dunbar for foot companies for 14 days from 9 Dec. 21 Dec 1641: the following sums to be paid the following officers, for pay till Jan 2 1642. Capt Dunbar 11 days 35.2.7 [Signed receipts]. 3 Jan 1642 Certain sums to be paid for their foot companies for 14 days from today to Capts ... John Dunbar ... [receipted]. 1642 List of sums owing to the inhabitants of Dublin from the following: .... Capts Dunbar ... 28 Mar 1642 £786/16/10 to Tichborne, Sir Henry, officers below ... Capt Dunbar £10/-/-. also p.788.
]The Cavalry regiment of Capt Arthur Hill mustered in April 1642 and again in September 1642: John Dunbar [second on list of soldiers], mustered at Carrickfergus, Antrim, Monday 18 April 1642, 12 officers, 60 troopers, 3 sick, 12 waggon horses; also listed in the second muster near Belfast 18 Sep 1642.
     He served in the Royalist army on 3 September 1651 in Worcester. He seems a little old for this role, so this may refer to his son.
     John died in 1657 in Rosscolton, Devenish, Fermanagh. A Chancery bill dated 10 May 1680/Jun 88? states that John Dunbar, son of Sir John Dunbar settled from 1653 to his death in 1657 in disputed premises which were mortgaged to the Dunbars. His son John & wife Mary and her second husband Arthur Weldon, brothers William & James are also mentioned. His brother William then lived there while young John inherited it.
T1089/50 states that John Dunbar, gent, who is son and heir of John Dunbar deceased who was second son of Sir John Dunbar, died immediately after the settlement in this Kingdom, being then under age, by his guardian Mary Dunbar, alias Veldon, his mother, enter into ... until he attained the full age, which was about three years since ... Catherine (daughter of Richard) is not above the age of 8.
Major John Dunbar was mentioned in the petition of Major John Dunbar in 1664 to the King for a regrant of the family lands. Copy of petition of John Dunbarr to the King, showing that: King James I, in recognition of the loyalty of the petitioner's grandfather, Sir John Dunbarr, granted him and to others entrusted for him, the small proportion of Drumcroe [Drumcrow] and other lands in the co. Fermanagh with a proviso that if any of them should be demised or aliened to any of the mere Irish or other persons who had not taken the oath of supremacy for one year before, then the said letters patents should be void and of no effect. Petitioner prays that in recognition of his services and those of his father, Major John Dunbarr, who served at Worcester and elsewhere, the said proportion of Drumcroe and other lands in Fermanagh of which he is in possession may be granted to him. He will by such grant be better able to enjoy and improve these lands, which "lying in a mountainous country, few English can be persuaded to dwell there; and if your petitioner have not the benefit of letting the said lands to the Irish, much of the advantage thereof must unavoidably be lost". The late King granted this benefit to several persons and the benefit so granted was confirmed by Act of Parliament.
He seems too young to be the author of this petition, but it was probably done in his name by his stepfather..
     Major John Dunbar and Richard Dunbar were mentioned in a civil court action on 19 May 1674. A Chancery bill entered on 19 May 1674 between Moutray, plaintiff & Weir, defendant sheweth that Archibald Erkskin, had lent Sir John Dunbar £500 upon mortgage upon certain lands. That Ann Erskin his heir (wife of John Moutray of Aghamoyle) took out administration of her father's property. That Sir John Dunbar had never repaid the mortgage. That in 1658 Richard Dunbar 'as son & heir' of Sir John Dunbar, entered into the said mortgaged premises in Magheraboy. That said Richard died in 1666-7, and Catherine his daughter, as his heir in her right, or some others in her behalf, entered the said premises and enjoyed them and doth still enjoy them. Orator is informed that the said deed of mortgage came into the hands of Edward Weir, senior, Edward Weir, junior, Alex Arthur Weldon, Wm Dunbar, Jas Somerwell & John Dunbar or to some or one of them etc.
In the answers to the above bill, of Alexander Weir of Monaghan? co. Fermanagh and Jas Somerwell, it is stated that these defts [deforciants] believe and have heard that
John Dunbar, gent, who is son & heir of John Dunbar, deceased, who was second son of Sir John Dunbar, did immediately after the settlement in this kingdom, being then under age, by his guardian Mary Dunbar alias Veldon, his mother, enter into and always receive the rents and profits of the lands in question until he attained full age, which was about three years since: and do well know that he is in the seizin and possession of the said lands by some arrangement made by his grandfather. But they deny that Richard Dunbar or his daughter Catherine ever entered into the lands or enjoyed the rents: and that the said Catherine is not above the age of eight years. And they deny any knowledge of the mortgage of any land that came into their possession.
The Books of Survey & Distribution for co. Fermanagh, parish of Inishmacsaint, compiled c. 1680 show lands that the Heirs of Sir John Dunbar, Protestant held at the time of the Civil Survey in 1641: 120 acres at Carneik Dessterran & Drumarrow Tates; 840 acres at Crumcrow Beaghem Corredcloney Fawbaghgoy, Drumbocony, Drumcrow, Rahalton, Rossladansk, Tullmaddall; Covneanem, Drumadowne, Ginovan, Drumore, Drumnaneane, Shrakinduff, Killgarrow, Drummarie, Ratonachow, Tullmacall, Divagh, Rossmurrgegg, Conuogh & Urbell. The entry is preceded by Sir George Holmes and followed by Mr Ardsdeale [Archdale?].
Major John Dunbar and William Dunbar were mentioned in 1680.
Sir John Dunbar - his second son Major John Dunbar of Rosscolton, was the founder of the village of Garrison and started an iron works there which was destroyed during the 1641 rebellion. [Parke]. There is a townland of Rosscullon in the parish of Devenish, the village of Garrison is divided by the River Ruagagh which forms the boundary of the parishes of Devenish and Inishmacsaint. The original pedigree attestation says that Major John Dunbar filed a bill in chancery against Mrs Catherine Montgomery as he was heir being next brother & second son to Sir John Dunbar. He died very soon after the bill was filed and that part of the estate remained with Hugh Montgomery. The family pedigree states that he built the barracks at Garrison..

Child of Major John Dunbar and Mary Harman

Major John Dunbar

(before January 1651 - before 26 September 1712)
     Major John Dunbar was born before January 1651 in Rosscolton, Devenish, Fermanagh, Ireland. The grandson of Sir John Dunbar was born about 1650 as he was described as reaching full age about three years before the Chancery bill entered on 19 May 1674. He was grandson of Sir John Dunbar, son of John & Mary Dunbar - his mother remarried Arthur Weldon and had a son Walter Weldon. His petition of 1664 re his lands in Drumcrow shows the Dunbar relationships and the 1674 & 1680 Chancery bills also explains the Weldon connection.
The History of Enniskillen, states: At the time of the Restoratiion (1660) Ireland had about 100,000 Episcopalians, 1 milliion RCs. All the new Cromwellian settlers were Presbyterians. He was the son of Major John Dunbar and Mary Harman.
He was a petitioner to the King for a regrant of the family lands in 1664. Copy of petition of John Dunbarr to the King, showing that: King James I, in recognition of the loyalty of the petitioner's grandfather, Sir John Dunbarr, granted him and to others entrusted for him, the small proportion of Drumcroe [Drumcrow] and other lands in the co. Fermanagh with a proviso that if any of them should be demised or aliened to any of the mere Irish or other persons who had not taken the oath of supremacy for one year before, then the said letters patents should be void and of no effect. Petitioner prays that in recognition of his services and those of his father, Major John Dunbarr, who served at Worcester and elsewhere, the said proportion of Drumcroe and other lands in Fermanagh of which he is in possession may be granted to him. He will by such grant be better able to enjoy and improve these lands, which "lying in a mountainous country, few English can be persuaded to dwell there; and if your petitioner have not the benefit of letting the said lands to the Irish, much of the advantage thereof must unavoidably be lost". The late King granted this benefit to several persons and the benefit so granted was confirmed by Act of Parliament.
He seems too young to be the author of this petition, but it was probably done in his name by his stepfather..
     John matriculated at Trinity College, Dublin, on 3 January 1667/68. He entered 3 Jan 1667/8 aged 17, a pensioner prepared by Mr Price. Son of John, armiger; born Dublin. Annotated as MP for Old Leighlin 1692.
Major John Dunbar married Catherine Wynne, daughter of Col Owen Wynne (I) and Catherine Hamilton, before 1670. She was a 9th cousin of her husband, both being descended from Robert II, but also a 2nd cousin once removed, her mother Catherine Hamilton, being his 2nd cousin via the Harman family..
Major John Dunbar and Catherine Dunbar, Sir John Dunbar, Mary Harman, Alexander Weir and Alexander Weir were mentioned in a court case on 19 May 1674. A Chancery bill entered on 19 May 1674 between Moutray, plaintiff & Weir, defendant sheweth that Archibald Erkskin, had lent Sir John Dunbar £500 upon mortgage upon certain lands. That Ann Erskin his heir (wife of John Moutray of Aghamoyle) took out administration of her father's property. That Sir John Dunbar had never repaid the mortgage. That in 1658 Richard Dunbar 'as son & heir' of Sir John Dunbar, entered into the said mortgaged premises in Magheraboy. That said Richard died in 1666-7, and Catherine his daughter, as his heir in her right, or some others in her behalf, entered the said premises and enjoyed them and doth still enjoy them. Orator is informed that the said deed of mortgage came into the hands of Edward Weir, senior, Edward Weir, junior, Alex Arthur Weldon, Wm Dunbar, Jas Somerwell & John Dunbar or to some or one of them etc.
In the answers to the above bill, of Alexander Weir of Monaghan? co. Fermanagh and Jas Somerwell, it is stated that these defts [deforciants] believe and have heard that
John Dunbar, gent, who is son & heir of John Dunbar, deceased, who was second son of Sir John Dunbar, did immediately after the settlement in this kingdom, being then under age, by his guardian Mary Dunbar alias Veldon, his mother, enter into and always receive the rents and profits of the lands in question until he attained full age, which was about three years since: and do well know that he is in the seizin and possession of the said lands by some arrangement made by his grandfather. But they deny that Richard Dunbar or his daughter Catherine ever entered into the lands or enjoyed the rents: and that the said Catherine is not above the age of eight years. And they deny any knowledge of the mortgage of any land that came into their possession.
Major John Dunbar and William Dunbar were mentioned in 1680.
A signed bond for £105 between James Wynne of Lurganboy, co. Leitrim, John Dunbar of Roscolton co. Fermanagh, John Brown of Kinturk Mayo to Thomas Hughes of Dublin dated 13 December 1680 is held at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.
13 Dec 1680: Bond for £105. James Wynne, Lurganboy, Co. Leitrim; John Dunnbarr, Roscolton, Co. Fermanagh; John Browne, Kinturk, Co. Mayo, to Thomas Hughes, Dublin..
Tho Pakenham: John Dunbarr Esq. (of Roscolton) vs James Somerville, Dame Anna Kathrina his wife, Katherine Dunbar & Sir Wm Stewart. R.. at 11 July 1683; ditto 29 Oct 1683; the following entry is for John Dunbar Clke: v. Alexander Mone? Feb 1685; then, John Dunbar, gent vs Nichs Coddington, Samuel Burrow, Wiliam Dunbarr, 27 May 1678.
He was a petitioner for a regrant of his family land on 24 January 1688. Ref to the Earl of Tyrconnell, Lord Deputy of Ireland of the petition of John Dunbar for a new grant of Drumers and other lands in co. Fermanagh, which he holds by virtue of letters patent from King James under some clauses & provisions which make him incapable of making any considerable advantage of it. He was mentioned in 1689 in Fermanagh, Ireland, as a Protestant fleeing from Fermanagh. Second list: Persons absent from Ireland since Nov 5th 1688, to be attainted if they did not in and submit before Sept 1st 1689: ... John Dunbar, Killcoe, Esquire. In the 1689 attainder lists Jo. Dunbar, Esq. & his wife and 5 children are listed as protestants of Ireland who lately fled the kingdom for safety, his property in Fermanagh was valued at £400 p.a. He was not given a rank, although some others in the list had Army ranks.
He was a petitioner on 12 October 1689. When James II succeeded and re-established Catholicism ... Some of the gentry, including John Dunbar, Sir John Hume & Lady Catherine Hamilton were forced to flee for safety from Ireland. Those attainted or accused of treason were: ... John Dunbar, Kilcoo ... nearly all those attainted signed the "Address from Enniskillen to King William III and Queen Mary" which was presented at Hampton Court on Oct 12 1689.
     The town of Garrison was founded about 1691 when King William halted his army there and erected a barrack there.      
Major John Dunbar was possibly the MP in 1692/93 for Old Leighlin, Carlow. This was the first parliament of William III and only lasted a month.
He built the barracks at Rosscolton. Rosscolton is a townland in the parish of Devenish, division of Coolyermer , OS reference 21.
     He served as an officer in the British Army between 1704 and 1715. 1704 Blenheim Roll: Major-General Ross' Regt of Dragoons: Cornet Jno Dunbar received £24.0.0. A footnote states that he was appointed Capt-Lieut of Col. Owen Wynne's newly raised Regiment of Foot, 25 Mar 1706. Capt same date. Major 15 Oct 1711. Appointed Major of Maj-Gen Owen Wynne's newly raised Regt of Dragoons (9th Lancers) in 1715. [Dalton p. 27-28].
     Col. Owen Wynne's newly raised Regt of Foot 25 March 1705: Lieutenants John Dunbar Capt. Lt. Supplementary commissions: John Dunbar to be Capt. vice Tho. Brereton,
Fras Cocksedge to be Ens. to Capt Jno Dunbar . The Regiment was sent to Ireland in 1706, served at the siege of Douay in 1710. Disbanded in England 21 July 1713, and the officers placed on half pay. Footnote states that he married Catherine Wynne, sister to Brigdr. Gen. Owen Wynne. Promoted Capt 25 March 1705, Major 15 Oct 1711. Placed on half pay in 1713. Appointed Major of Maj. Gen Owen Wynne's Regt of Dragoons 22 July 1715. On half pay [in 1722. [Dalton, English army lists and commission registers 1703-1706 p. 184-5].
     Dalton - Vol. 6 (1707-1714) p. 241. Major John Dunbar. Brig. Gen. Owen Wynne's Regt of Foot (disbanded 1713, went to Flanders 1708, siege at Douay 1710). John Dunbar to be major 15 Oct 1711.
     Dalton, Geo I's army 1714-1727, 1910 p. 113: Gen. Wynn's Regiment of Dragoons (9th Dragoons) - John Dunbarr major & captain. Footnote - This officer married Catherine Wynne, sister to Maj. Gen Owen Wynne. Appointed Major of Major General Owen Wynne's new regiment of Dragoons (9th Lancers) 22 July 1715. On half pay in 1722. [Note that Catherine Wynne (Dunbar) was a widow in 1721 and probably before 1712!].
     According to the original pedigree attestation he was a major in the Carbineers & Aide de camp to the first Duke of Marlborough who sent a letter to the Secretary of War in 1716 (but this may refer to his son).
A family story states that he died on the day his promotion to Major was published (6 Aug 1715)..
Major John Dunbar was mentioned. On the 8th November, 1707, twelve years after his father's death, James signed a document which read as follows:
'Know all men by these presents that I, James Wynne of Lurganboy, son and heir of James Wynne of Lurganboy, deceased, having maturely considered the many and great debts contracted by my father in his life time and which were left unpaid at the time of his death as also the insufficiency of the estate and assets by him left for paying the said debts and for maintaining of me and my sisters Dorothy, Sidney, Jane and Mary Wynne. I gratefully acknowledge the kindness of my uncle Owen Wynne of Ballinow (Ballina?) in the County of Mayo, Esquire, in taking upon him the administration of my said father's goods and chattels and the guardianship of me during my minority and being fully satisfied that the sum of money by him expended paying my said fathers' debts, in maintaining of me and my sisters and portioning of my sister Dorothy, do far exceed the sum of money he had or might have received as executor or guardian as aforesaid. Do therefore hereby exonerate, discharge, release and forever quit claim unto the said Owen Wynne, his heirs executors and administrators, of and from all manner of accounts and demands whatsoever from the beginning of the world unto the date of these presents'.
The occasion when this document was signed by James was attended by much solemnity. Five witnesses added their signatures to it. These were John Dunbar, brother-in-law of James senior, Owen Wynne III; John Wynne, who was probably James senior's brother, and John Miller and Francis Cocksedge, relations of the Wynne family by marriage.
The document is drafted in very wide terms. Its effect was to declare that nothing was due to James from his father's estate because of his father's insolvency. The money raised by the sale of the Welsh estate had been spent, while the lands in County Leitrim must have been heavily encumbered. Owen II, who no doubt was making the decisions, could, after paying the debts, have left his nephew James as owner of the land and could have made him his own heir. But Owen II decided that his heir should be, not James, but Owen III, the son of his younger brother Lewis Wynne. In that same year, 1707, James the younger settled on Owen Wynne III the Lurganboy estate including the bishop's leases, while on his death in 1737 Owen II left his property, in particular the newly acquired Hazelwood estate, to Owen III.
John, Owen, Francis, Geroge and John witnessed a document dated on 8 November 1707.
He was a petitioner to the Duke of Marlborough circa 1708. To his Grace the Duke of Marlbrough [sic], Capt John Dunbar memorial: Humbly rep..sent. That he served in Flanders the first three years of this war having been a cornet in the Royal Irish Dragoons, [inserted above] that he is ... had has held a Company in Major General Wynne's Regt ever since it was raised where he is eldest Captain [the latter phrase crossed out]. That he served as Major of Brigade from the beginning of the Incampment in the Isle of Wight (the late expedition under Lieut General Earle) till the time tha the five British regiments were ordered from Ostend to Antwerp where he continued to act in the same station & afterwards to the British Battalion in Lisle. That he would have applied to Lieut General Earle for a commission as Major of Brigade but that he supposed that a commission from the Queen had been taken out for him, at the same time as that for Major Nuttell of Brigadier Lucy's Regiments (who was a younger officer & to a younger brigade).
That he being now informed that those Regiments are to be Brigaded & take the field this year he humbly prays that your Grace to take his p~tentions into your consideration and to order him a commission accordingly.

Verso: A copy of Major Jno Dunbar's memorial. Undated but internal evidence suggests about 1708.
     John died before 26 September 1712 in Ballycarney, Ballinacarrig or Staplestown, Carlow, Ireland. Memorial of deeds dated 31 March & 1 April 1721 between John Dunbar of the city of Dublin, esq. of the one part and Frances Cocksedge of Dublin, esq. of the other part the said release reciting that the ... Earl of Thomond by a deed of free farm dated the 26th September 1712 did grant release and confirm unto Katherine Dunbar, widow, mother of the said John Dunbar, all those the lands of Quinagh with these ... epirnation?? circa 370 acres, in the parish of Ballinacarrig, Barony of Catherlogh, County of Catherlogh To hold unto the said Katherine Dunbar her heirs and assigns for ever all and under the yearly free farm rent of forty six pounds with several ... the said John Dunbar ... in consideration of five hundred pounds to him paid by the said Francis Cocksedge did grant release and confirm ... Francis Cocksedge all that the afsd ... witnessed by James Ramsey of Dublin, perukemaker John Coyle servt to the said John Dunbar and Henry Buckley of the same city of Dublin, notary public. Jo Dunbar signed and sealed.
     The administration of his estate was granted to George Dunbar on 14 July 1764 at the Prerogative Court of Armagh, Ireland. The will of John Dunbar of Ballycarney co. Carlow, Esq. dated 27 May 1724, proved 20 July 1724 mentions his mother Catherine, sister Elizabeth, son George, sisters Ann Turner, Katherine Milley, Elizabeth Dunbar?, wife Anne, uncle Walter Weldon, confirms that John's father is dead, yet George is granted administration of his grandfather John Dunbar of Carlow's estate on 14 July 1764 - possibly on the death of his grandmother Katherine? The Prerog Grant book lists a John Dunbar of Dublin, gent with a will and an Ann Dunbar intestate in 1765. Another John Dunbar of Dublin gent's estate is proved 12 Nov 1764 - wife Eleanor Stafford, son Isaac Hayes Dunbar & his wife Mary & children Arthur & Anne.
He was presumably the John Dunbar who fought for William III and was awarded Ballycarney, co. Carlow. There is confusion between this John and his son who died in 1724. I think that someone who was involved in founding a garrison and probably aged about 40 is unlikely to be appointed a cornet in 1704.
     1667 17 Dec: Kinsale - Mr John Dunbar has come in from the Canary [to port]. Calendar of State Papers, Ireland Chas II, 1666-9 p.493].
     The original pedigree states that he married secondly Jane, the widow of George,Marquis of Huntly.

Children of Major John Dunbar and Catherine Wynne

Rev John Dunbar

(10 August 1796 - 18 February 1868)
     Rev John Dunbar was christened on 10 August 1796 in St Martin's, Leicester, Leicestershire. His son Halahan in the 1880 USA census stated that his father had been born in Jamaica. He was the son of Major John Killigrew Dunbar and Helena Nash.
The Irish newspaper Freeman's Journal on 22 & 23 May 1815 carried the following advertisement: Whereas my son John Dunbar (a boy not yet nineteen) has been seduced from his home and studies, and his future prospects in life probably destroyed by, it is supposed, some designing female (with the future idea of possessing my property) and as no for, of marriage can be valid at his age, without my consent, I hereby warn all clergymen of the circumstance, and further caution the public, not to harbour or receive, under their protection the said John Dunbar, or give him credit for anything on my account, being determined to prosecute such as do according as the law directs: -his natural home never having been shut against him, or any cause ever been given for his thus absenting himself from his family, and the considerable distress of his afflicted father, John Killigrew Dunbar, Clanbrassil Place, Dublin, 20 May 1815.
Rev John Dunbar married Frances Holmes Halahan, daughter of John Halahan and Mary Handy, on 27 May 1815 in Middle or New parish, Greenock, Renfrewshire, Scotland.
     John matriculated at Trinity College, Dublin, between 1819 and 1822. John Dunbar entered Trinity as a pensioner prepared by Mr Martin June 8 1819 aged 23. He was described as the son of John, centurio; born Leicester.
His father and his second family were also active in the parish of St Peter's, Dublin between 1811 and 1822. He graduated in April 1822 from Dublin with a Bachelor of Arts.
In the Parliamentary papers, account of schools to which grants of money have been made for the year to the 5 Jan 1824: name of applicant - John H Dunbar, school - Garrison, amount - £14. John was curate at Belleek and Inishmacsaint at Fermanagh, Ireland, between 1824 and 1868. In 1824 he was Curate assistant in the parish of Belleek, in 1825, 1826 & 1828 he was curate at Inishmacsaint. Belleek Church of Ireland was located at Oughterdrum from its inception in 1791 (carved out of Templecarn) to 1909 when the parochial hall in Belleek was dedicated as a church
     In the Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland Nov 1834: Derrygonnelly, Churchill and Garrison are the only villages in the parish. Garrison derives its name from a circumstance of King William halting his army after the battle of Aughrim [12 July 1691] and erecting a barrack in the neighbourhood, the trace of which and a portion of Barrack Street is still perceptible. It is situated on the River Ruagagh, 10 miles west of Derrygonnelly and close to the south eastern margin of Lough Melvin, and opening a communication with the county of Leitrim; comprises about 10 well built houses within its jurisdiction. A new church was consecrated in 1831 in the townland of Binmore. There is also a church in the townland of Slavin capable of containing 150 persons. There is another small church in Garrison accommodating 200 parishioners. With the exception of the Protestant and R.C. clergy and the commandant of the constabulary there is not another resident gentleman with the boundaries of the parish. In the immediate vicinity of Derrygonnelly are the ruins of an old chapel of ease, in remote time the private chapel of the Dunbars and Montgomerys, the churchyard still forming the cemetery of the family and surrounding population. The western gable of the ruin contains a doorway of superior masonry, surmounted with the family coat of arms, a drawing of which is appended to this report. In the townland of Tully, are the ruins of an old castle, the original mansion of the Hume family ... its destruction in the rebellion of 1641, when the castle was surrendered upon promise of fair quarter, on which the inmates were first stripped and all murdered without mercy. ... Derrygonnelly contains very recently a resident surgeon and Churchill has the benefit of an established dispensary. Several schools. The village of Garrison forms the boundary between the parish of Inishmacsaint and Devenish
. John was rector at Ballybay, Monaghan, between 1847 and 1868. In 1852 there was also a Presbyterian Meeting House in the town and in the adjacent area another established church and five Presbyterian churches, one Covenanting House andn the Roman Catholic chapel of Tullycorbitt and Balintra. By 1856 there were 9 other churches in the district.
The Rev John Dunbar, Rector of the parish of Ballibay. A few friends of the Rev John Dunbar, anxious to testify their esteem and respect for him as a neighbour, a gentleman, and a Christian Minister, beg to present him with a new Pulpit Gown, in lieu of the one so sacrilegiously robbed out the Vestry of the Church. Ballibay, 29 Jan 1848.
My dear friends. It is with the most unfeigned gratitude I receive your kind Present, especially when I reflect upon the very short time I have been with you; it is most gratifying, as it testifies your esteem for me, as your Friend and Minister during that period: and I trust, that as long as the Lord spare me among you, that that friendship and esteem will increase more and more. Believe me, my dear friends, Yours, most gratefully, John Dunbar. Rectory 29 Jan 1848.
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Rev John Dunbar was assessed for tax on a freehold at Derrynaloobinagh circa 1858 in Ballybay, Monaghan. He had a house, offices and land valued at £46. The land was in 2 pieces - 7 acres valued at £8 and 15 acres 3 roods 14 perches valued at £18, the latter having £20 buildings worth £20. He sublet a house and office worth £1 to John Carr. He also leased land valued at £13/10/- from Emily Leslie in the townland of Derryvally. He was widowed on 2 May 1863 on the death of his wife Frances Holmes Halahan. He witnessed Jane Armstrong Halahan's will dated 17 November 1866 in Dublin.
     John died of bronchitis on 18 February 1868 in 'Gulistan', Upper Mt Pleasant Ave, Rathmines, St Peter's parish, Dublin, Ireland, aged 71. The Londonderry sentinel on 21 Feb 1868 reported: Feb 18, at Gulistan, Upper Mount Pleasant Avenue, Dublin, the Rev John Dunbar, Rector of Ballybay, eldest son of the late Major Dunbar of Garrison, county Fermanagh. The Nenagh Guardian reported on Saturday, April 27 1839: The Rev John Dunbar, Rector of Ballybay, co. Monaghan, son of the late Major John Killigrew Dunbar, 83rd Regiment, grandson of Major George Dunbar, MP Gonron Castle, co. Kilkenny, and nepjew of the first Earl of Normanton.
The Melbourne Argus
reported: DUNBAR.-On the 18th February, at the residence of his brother-in law, the Rev. H. R. Halahan, Gulistan, Upper Mount Pleasant-avenue, the Rev. John Dunbar, rector of Ballaybay, eldest son of the late John Killegrew Dunbar, 83rd Regiment, grand-son of Major George Dunbar, M.P., Gowran Castle, County Kilkenny, nephew of the first earl of Normantown, and father of George Killegrew Dunbar, Dandenong. He was buried on 20 February 1868 in St Paul, Dublin.
     His will was proved on 5 November 1868 at Dublin. The will of the Rev John Dunbar, late of Ballybay Rectory, co. Monaghan deceased who died 18 February 1868 at Gulistan, co. Dublin. P.R. by Rev. Halahan Dunbar of Belleek, co. Fermanagh, one of the executors. Effects under £800.

Children of Rev John Dunbar and Frances Holmes Halahan

Rev John Dunbar

(circa 1534 - 2 December 1590)
     Rev John Dunbar was also known as John Dunbar (3rd of Meft/Bennetsfield) in records. He was born illegitimate circa 1534 in Scotland. He was the illegitimate son of John Dunbar of Bennetsfield. He was the son of John Dunbar.
1548/9 6 Feb Edinburgh: He was heir to his brother David Dunbar, son of John Dunbar of Bennetsfield if he had no male heirs, failing his issue he would be succeeded by Patrick Dunbar of Sanquhair & heirs or Patrick's brother John Dunbar & heirs.
Charter of confirmation. 16 June 1540 (sic).
2 Aug 1558: Sasine in favour of Mr John Dunbar therein designed natural son to John Dunbar of Bennadgefield of the lands of Over & Nether Mefts, proceeding upon a charter from the Prior & convent of Pluscarden in his favours.
]8 Aug. 1558 Copy of charter by Alexander Prior of Pluscarden to Mr John Dunbar, natural son of the deceased John Dunbar of Bennagefield, q.d. to George Dunbar brother german of the deceased John Dunbar of Bennagefield q.d. Patrick Dunbar of Sanquhar q.d. Robert Dunbar of Darsie of Over & Nether Mefts the brewery thereof. [#389 Innes writs]..
Rev John Dunbar was mentioned on 8 August 1558.
Rev John Dunbar married Margaret Urquhart? before 1570. Some unconfirmed sources give her name as Marion Sutherland.Based on the shields on the memorial stones, it has been assumed that Margaret was an Urqhuart..
Rev John Dunbar married secondly Isabella Leslie? after 1570. Based on the shields on the memorial stones, it has been assumed that Isabel was a Leslie.
29 April 1571 Charter by David Dunbar of Benechfeld in favour of Mr. John Dunbar of Meftis, of lands of Vodland and wood of Crukvod in barony and regality of Vrquhard (Urquhart) and sheriffdom of Elgin and Forres. [Signed David Dunbar of Wrquhard].
In 1582, Mr John Dunbar of Mefts was mentioned in the Innes writs. Mefts was part of the Innes estate in the parish of Urquhart.
17 May 1583 at Edinburgh: Rentali Domini Regis, Ros & Ardmanach. The miln at Peconnochie .. the ailhouse, Killane, Bennechefeild, Petfure alias Dene Miln ... which lands etc. pertanit in tak & rentale of befoir to David Dunbar in Bennachefield ... contract betwixt the said David & Magister John Dunbar his brother, reg. in Commissariot buke of Ross ... 5 year contract... The foregoing entry is repeated at p. 251 of the original records with the following addenda: Ye sall resaif in our Sov. Lord rental of Ardmananoch Maister Johne Dunbar of Meftis as rentalar in manner aboune written ... Holyroodhouse 30 Nov afsd.
     Rev John Dunbar and John Dunbar were mentioned in a deed dated 14 July 1586 in Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland. 14 July 1586 at Falkland: Rex confirmavit cartam factam per quondam Alex, Priorem [introductory clause "commendatarium"] de Pluscarden, et ejusdem conventum, - qua ad feudifirman dimiserunt M. (Magister) Joanni Dumbar, filio naturali quond. Joannis D de Bennethfield - villas et terras de Ovir et Nether Meftis, cum brasina et 3 acris, in baronia et regalitate sua de Urquhaird, vic. Elgin et Fores: - Tenend. dicto M[. Jo et heredibus masc. ejus de corpore legit. procreatis quibis deficientibus [failing legit male heirs] to David Dunbar of Bennethfield and his heirs, failing them to George Dunbar, fratri germano dicti quond. Jo., and his heirs, failing them to Patricio Dunbar of Sanquhair & heirs, failing them to Roberto Dunbar of Durris & heirs, de dicto monast; cum communi pastura a terris arabilus de Meftis ad austrum ad terras arabiles de Lucharis ad boream; cum communitate in nemore the Luchar-boge ad pasturam animalium, lucandrum glebas "lie turvis", et cespites, vix "pettis, turffis, fealis and dewaitties", et ad cedend. gramina "lie ster" ac silvam "lie void cuttin" (a "the Bruntwater" ad orien. ad terras arabiles de Lucharis ad occiden.); et communitate in the "Luchar-mure"; ac cum postestate lucrandi terras nondum cultas, incipiendo a finibus "the lang-dikis" et Brumelaw dictis terris de Meftis pertinen., et super "lie" Medewmuir usque ad metas terrarum de Innes :- Reddend. pro Uvir Meftis 8 lib. 10 sol. 4 den. firme antique, et 56 sol. 9 den. pro gressuma, 13 bollas victualium pro arida multura ob liberam molationem victualium ad molendinum de Dynkemptie, 4 bollas avenarum custumalium, 2 duodenas caponum, 2 duodenas pultrearum, 4 oves custumales, 10 sol. augmentationis, cum arreagiis et carriagliis 4 equorum cum ductioribus in vectione turbariorum seu pettariorum ad loca de Urquhaird et Pluscarden; pro Wester (vel Nethir) M. 8 lib. 10 sol. 4 den. firme antique, 56 sol. 9 den. pro .... Rev John Dunbar was the heir of Alexander Dunbar in the confirmation charter dated on 14 July 1586 14 July 1586 at Falkland: Confirmation charter made by late Alex. Prior of Pluscarden, & his convent - qua ad feudifirmam dimiserunt M. John Dumbar, natural son of the late John Dumbar of Benethfeild, - town and lands of Over & Nether (Wester) Meftis, with brewhouse & 3 accris, in the barony and regality of Urquhart, near Elgin & Forres: TENEND. said M. Jo.[ & his legitimate heirs male of his body, whom failing to, David Dunbar of Bennetsfield & his heirs (as above), q.d.. George Dunbar, brother germane of the said late John, & his heirs etc., q.d. Patrick Dunbar of Sanquhair & his heirs, q.d. Robert Dunbar, of Durris & his heirs, of said monast ; with communi pastura a terris arabilus de Lucharis ad boream; cum ...REDDEND pro Ovir Meftis ....
Contract of Aunation between the said Mr John Dunbar & Alexander Dunbar his second son dated 16 June 1590.
     John died on 2 December 1590 in Bennetsfield, Avoch, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland. In Elgin cathedral there is a tablet about 3 feet square with armorial shields to the Dunbars of Bennagefield or Bennetsfield in the parish of Avoch, Ross-shire. The inscription is curiously chiselled: Hic jacet M. John Dunbar de Bennethfield qui obiit 2 Decr 1590; et Mar et Issob. Dunbars ejus conjuges quae obierunt 3 Nov 1570, et 4 Dec 1603, et Nicol Dunbar filius dicti M. Ion, quondon Balivus de Elgin, qui obiit 31 Jan 1651, et Griss. Mavor, ejus spousa, que obiit 21 Juli 1648, et Ione Dunbar, spousa Joni Dunbar fillii dicti Nicol, que obiit 8 Sep 1648; ideoque hoc instruendem curovit Joh. filius. [Here lies Mr [Magister] John Dunbar of Bennetfield who died 2 Dec 1590; & Margaret & Isabel Dunbars his wives who died 3 Nov 1570 & 4 Dec 1603, & Nicol Dunbar son of the said Mr John, late Bailie of Elgin, who died 31 Jan 1651, & Grace or Griswell Mavor his wife who died 21 Jul 1648; & Joan Dunbar, wife of John Dunbar son the said Nicol who died 8 Sep 1648, and therefore, John the son, took care to have this to be erected. He was buried in Elgin Cathedral, Moray, Scotland.
Rev John Dunbar was mentioned on 21 July 1591.
His family lands appeared to have been transferred to Sir William Keith of Delny. The King confirmed to his familiar counsellor Sir William Keith of Delny, master or keeper of his wardrobe, and his heirs male and assignees, the lands and recently erected barony of Delny, as in a charter made at Falkland on 1 August 1587, as follows (from RMS, v, charter no. 1331):
The king, after dissolving in a recent parliament the annexation (made in the time of James III, with the consent of the three estates) of the earldom of Ross to his crown, set at feu ferm to William Keith, master of his wardrobe, and his heirs male and ass[ignees, the towns and lands of Meikle Allan, alias Allanmuir, the brew-house of the same, Culrossy, Drummedart, alias Drummeach, Glastuly, Drumgilye, Mekill Meddat, alias Meddatmoir, the brew-house with the brewery lands of the same, without toft [and] croft, the lands of Wester Pollo, Badebaa, Ruiffis, Knokapark, Ballintred, Fiachiache (Fiachlache?), Ardingaak, Delny, the brew-house of the same with toft [and] croft, and with two other brew-houses of the same without toft [and] croft, the orchard of Delny, Calrechie, Incheafuir, Kingcraig, Culkenzie, Craigmylne, with the multures and brew-houses of the same, Cumlaachmonoch, Cumlichmoir, Bracach, Balcony, with the brewery and Flukariscroft, half the 'Daach de Culmalochie', the lands of Culcragy (or Kincragie), the mill of Alness, with the fishery of Ardroy vocat. 'the Stell' with the 'yair de Balcony' with the brew-house of the same, Culcarne with the brew-house of the same, the lands of Swordale, Fyres, Culcragy with the mill and multures of the same, with the brew-house of the same, the lands of Mylnetoun of Culmalochy, Over Culmelochy, the fishery called 'the Stell de Ardroy', the fishery of Ardmoir called 'the Stell', the mill of Catwoll with its multures, Lyttill Scattoll, Rowie, Kynnellane, Wester Drany, Ardullie, with the mill called Tympen-mylne and its multure, the brew-house of Kinnettes, alias Ardwell, Kynnahard, Easter and Wester Achille, the brew-house of Coull, with its croft, and the brew-house of the same without the croft, the lands of Park, Ulledell, Meikle Scattoll, Urray, Kilchiliddrum, Ord, with the mill and brew-house, Bow(b)lair, Balnagowan, Balnaknock, Tarradale, with the mill, the ferry, Scutell, Logyreith, with the brew-house, Easter Kessock, Kessock ferry, the fishery of the same called 'the Stell', with the brew-house of the same, the lands of Easter Pollo and Auchinaloche, with the mansions, manors, fortalices, mills, rivers, fisheries, the lands of Morichmoir adjacent to the part of the sea called 'the Briggis', and surrounded by the sea for the greater part (between the Briggis to the north, another part of the sea called Polnagragak to the east, the Tain ferry and sea to the west, the lands of Inverathie, Petnellie, Ballacherie, Ballingall, Newtoun to the south), in the earldom of Ross, sheriffdom of Inverness; the towns and lands of Garguston, Newton of Redcastle with the brew-house and smiddy-croft of the same, Hilton, the mill of Culbokie with its multures, Drumquhidden, 'Vester-half-Daachis', 'Eister-half-Dachis', with the brew-house of the Daachis and its croft, the lands of Killen, Bennetsfield and the mill of Petfur, with its multures, the lands of Drynie with the brew-house of Petfur, the mill of Petchonachtie, alias Petfur, with its multures and brew-house of the same, in the lordship of Ardmeanach, sheriffdom of Inverness. All of which the king incorporated in the free barony of Delny and wished that a single sasine taken at the mansion and manor of Delny should stand for all. Paying annually [a lengthy list of payments follows], with duplication of the feu ferms on entry of an heir.]
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Children of Rev John Dunbar

Children of Rev John Dunbar and Margaret Urquhart?

Rev John Dunbar

     Rev John Dunbar was the son of Rev Robert Dunbar. John was minister at Knockando, Moray, from 1764.
Rev John Dunbar married Janet Grant on 5 June 1777 in Knockando, Moray. She was the daughter of George Grant of Aberdeen. he may have previously married Margaret Stuart on 21 Jul 1768 there. John was minister at Dyke, Moray, in 1788.

Children of Rev John Dunbar and Janet Grant

Child of Rev John Dunbar

Rev John Dunbar

(before 1568 - before February 1637)
     Rev John Dunbar was also known as John Dunbar (of Mefts) in records. He was born before 1568 in Scotland. He was the son of Rev John Dunbar and Margaret Urquhart?
Rev John Dunbar married Marion Sutherland.
He succeeded his brother Mr James Dunbar of Meftis before October 1577.
     I am confused at this stage whether Alex, George & Findualla were children of John who died in 1637 or John who died in 1590.

     A John Dunbar of Bennedgefield was mentioned in the Sasines for Elgin in series 1 v. 4 (=1633-1649) 101.
Rev John Dunbar married Agnes MacKenzie, daughter of Roderick MacKenzie (of Redcastle) and Finguella (Florence) Munro.
     John died before February 1637 in Bennetsfield, Avoch, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland. He was buried in February 1637 in the South aisle, Rosemarkie, Ross & Cromarty. The Sepuchral monument of the honourable John Dunbar of Bennethfield, Agnes McKenzie his spouse, and of his predeccessors and successors, carying the surname of Dunbar. He's heir was Alexander Dunbar on 28 February 1637 in Bennetsfield, Avoch. Rev John Dunbar's heir was Alexander Dunbar on 22 November 1677 in Avoch. .

Child of Rev John Dunbar and Marion Sutherland

Children of Rev John Dunbar and Agnes MacKenzie

Child of Rev John Dunbar

Sir John Dunbar

(before 1570 - circa 1657)
     Sir John Dunbar was born before 1570 in Avoch, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland. He was the son of George Dunbar and Janet Thomson.
     John was educated from 20 October 1580. A charter dated 20 Oct 1580 at Holyrood: Gift to John Dunbar, letter ... understanding the chaplainer of Drummis, land in diocese of Ross, vailis and is becum in his majesties's handis and at this new gift & disposition be made by his hieness to Patrick Dunbar student & bursar in grammar, of the said chaplaincy for 7 years is already expired & H.M. willing that the same be conferred of new to another bursar in grammar for the help of sustaining at scoles for another 7 years therefore of new disponand to John Dunbar, son lawful to George Dunbar of Awache ... the said chaplanerie for 7 years.
Sir John Dunbar was mentioned in a confirmation charter on 14 August 1591 in Avoch, Ross & Cromarty. At Holyroodhouse: The King with agreement etc (10), - Confirmation charter George Dunbar, parson of Kilmuir, and Janet Thamesoun his spouse, - [qua/who?, for perimpletione [extinguish/prevent??] of the same contractus, sold to John Dumbar, his legitimate son, his heirs and assigns - three quarters town sue and lands of Avach, with the mill of Avach, its multures [payments for grinding the corn] & the right to pursue them?, with lie yair and salmon fishery of the same... Tenend: [Tenendus is the form of feudal tenure by which lands are held] of the King , in place of the Archbishop of Ross, in perpetual lease: with warrant of sasine directo David Jaksoun alias Young in Awach: Witness: Robert Graham, archdeacon of Ross, William Thamesoun burgen. of Rosmerkie ... 11 June 1591]: - As mentioned above ratification all charters by him/itself or the Archbishop of Ross, said George & John of above made; and said lands etc.. aforesaid John of nova dedit [new gift, but a term used in bankruptcy] :- Witness: as in other charters etc. xli 47.
     Sir John Dunbar and George Dunbar were mentioned in a deed dated 22 March 1591/92 in West Lothian (Linlithgowshire), Scotland. King with agreements etc. ... in feuholding surrenders to John Dunbar son of George Dunbar of Awach, his heirs & assigns, etc ... lands, house, outhouse, and garden of the parsonage of Kilmure infro collegium eccl. Ross. Alnes ... Containe ex north ... Roskene ... Kincairdin, etc. John witnessed a document dated on 27 April 1592. John witnessed a document dated on 27 Apr 1592. Assignation by George Dunbar of Avache, parson of Kilmure, witnesses includes John Dunbar, the grantor's son..
Sir John Dunbar married Katherine Graham, daughter of Sir Richard Graham or Greame and Elizabeth Hetherington, circa 1592.
     John was a defendant in a court case on 14 June 1593. Letters purchased at the instance of Alexander Dunbar apparent of Tarbert against John Dunbar feuar of Awauch for production and delivery of 2 contracts and a charter made betwixt the said pursuer and Mr James Dunbar his brother. The Lords of Council give decreet in favour of pursuer.
     John was a plaintiff in a civil court case on 30 July 1595 in Avoch. Letters purchased at the instance of John Dunbar of Awauche proprietor of the lands etc. underwritten against Hew Lyall in the chanonry of Ross and sundry others, of lands lying within the Bishopric of Ross & Sheriffdom of Inverness, to flit and remove from their respective occupancies. Decreet is given against the defenders..
     John was a plaintiff in a civil court case on 6 December 1595. Action at the instance of John Dunbar, fiar of Awach, against George Ross of Balnagowne, for the spoilation and awaytaking of a grey horse belonging to the pursuer furth of the burgh of Tain, valued at 200 pounds. cont.. He witnessed a document on 28 February 1595/96 in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland. At Holyroodhouse - John Dunbar, filio Geo Dunbar of Awaych witnessed document between Alex Urquhart and Kenneth McKenzie of Kintail. He was described as heir apparent in the confirmation charter relating to the late David Dunbar.
1598-99: Complaint by John Dunbar of Avach & Donald Rid, his servant, as follows: Donald was attacked by Millers who afterward attacked Dunbar & his servants in the kirk ... then Dunbar retaliated ... The complainer appearing personally, the accused, for not appearing are all to be denounced rebels
John Irwing of Kynnock for Rory Dingwall of Kildene £500, not to harm John Dunbar of Awach - the said Rory & Mr Rannald Bane indweller in Edinburgh, sureties in relief [ibid, v.5 p.713 ].
Edinburgh 4 Apr. Rory Dingwell of Kildin for Alexander Miller & others 300 merks each, to answer upon 31 May next to complain against them by John Dumbar of Avach. [ibid. v.5 p.720].
20 June 1598 at Edinburgh: Registration by Mr John Moncrieff as procurator, of band by John Dunbar, fiar of Avach, for Robert Ros in Little Rany, 500 merks, not to harm John Ros in Muldarg. Subscribed at the chanonry of Ros 13 June before Gawin Dunbar his brother, David Ros in the Chanonry of Rose & Adam Dunbar, notary public, writer thereof. Gavin was also mentioned as the brother of John Dunbar fiar of Avoch in Sep 1599.
1 Dec 1598 at Holyroodhouse: John Grenour alias Tennant de Pitfure ... 1598 vendidit John Dunbar feodatario de Avach heribus ejus & assignatus ... lands in Killane, lordship of Ardmannach .. Test: Robt Graham, archdeacon Ross ... apud Canonium Ross. 31 May 1598.
21 June 1599 at Edinburgh: To denounce John Munro of Pitconachie for disobedience: Complaint by John Dunbar of Avach ... John Munro of Pitconachie ... 80 armed men to the complainers lands of Blairfad & Kelane 24 Sep 1598. Protest in favour of John Dunbar of Awach re Millers.
8 Aug 1599 at Edinburgh: Geo Monro of Mekle Tarrell for John Monro of Pittruichtie 300 merks to answer upon the 15 Nov next to a complaint made against him by John Dunbar of Avach.
14 September 1599: ... John Dunbar of Avach for Robert Leslie of Douglie (Finrasie) provost of Rosmerky in £1000 ... not to harm John Irwing of Kynnock (fol.150a); Kenneth McKenzie of Kintail for John Dunbar, fiar of Avach in 1000 merks, Donald Rid his servant, James Dunbar of Little Suddy, Alexander, Robert, Gavin & Colene, brothers to the said John, Mungo Gowane burgess of Rosmerky, Robert his son ... not to harm Rory Dingwill of Kildin & various Banes and Millers. Registered Edinburgh.
     Kenneth Mackenzie entered into a bond for a thousand merks that John Dunbar, Fiar of Avoch, and James Dunbar of Little Suddie, four sons of John of Avoch, and several others, in five hundred merks each, that they will not harm Roderick Dingwall of Kildin, Duncan Bayne, apparent heir of Tulloch, Alexander Bayne of Loggie, and other sons and grandsons of Bayne of Tulloch.
In 1598 some gentlemen in Fife, afterwards known as the "Fife Adventurers," obtained a grant of the Lewis with the professed object of civilising the inhabitants. It is not intended here to detail their proceedings or to describe at much length the squabbles and constant disorders, murders, and robberies which took place while they held possession of the Island. The speculation proved ruinous to the Adventurers, who in the end lost their
estates, and were obliged to leave the islanders to their fate.
A brief summary of it will suffice, and those who desire more information on the subject will find a full account of it in the History of the Macleods. [By the same author. A. & W. Mackenzie, Inverness, 1889.]
On the 15th of June, 1599, Sir William Stewart of Houston, Sir James Spence of Wormistoun, and Thomas Cunningham appeared personally before the Privy Council "to take a day for the pursuit of Kenneth Mackenzie of Kintail upon such crimes as criminally they had to lay to his charge for themselves and in the name of the gentlemen-ventuaries of their society," and the 26th of September was fixed for the purpose.
On the 14th of September Kenneth enters into a bond for a thousand merks that
John Dunbar, Fiar of Avoch, and James Dunbar of Little Suddie, four sons of John of Avoch, and several others, in five hundred merks each, that they will not harm Roderick Dingwall of Kildin, Duncan Bayne, apparent heir of Tulloch, Alexander Bayne of Loggie, and other sons and grandsons of Bayne of Tulloch,
Sir James Stewart enters into a bond, on 6 Oct for 600 merks that Kenneth [od Kintail] will not harm James Crombiie, a burgess of Perth, signed in Dunkeld in presence of Murdo Mackenzie, apparent heir of Redcastle, John Mackenzie, iminister of Dingwall, and Alexander Mackenzie, writer.
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17 Oct 1599 at Edinburgh: Alex Fraser in Gusachquhwan for John Munro of Pitconoche in £1000, & for John Munro of Easter Half Davach in 500 merks not to harm or molest John Dunbar of Avache. Band, registered by Mr Alex Levingstoun is subscribed at Kingeli 17 Oct before Hucheon Froaser, apparent of Foir, Wm Fraser of Culmiln & Alex McLauchlan in Drumcarday.
8 Feb 1600, Edinburgh: John Forbes alias Miller in Inverness... for not answering a complaint against him by John Dunbar of Avach & Donald Reid his servant.
20 May 1600: To denounce John Dunbar of Avach for not answering to a complaint of John Forbes of Inverness. For failing to appear denounced rebel. Edinburgh.
1602: John Dunbar fiar of Awach, for George Dunbar of Avach his father 300 merks, to present before the King & Council upon 4 Nov next Jonet Thornetoun, daughter of David Thornton in the Chanonry of Ros, conform to the letters of horning directed against him. Said John Dunbar for James Dunbar of Little Sudy, Archibald Falconer in Fairmyln, Robert Gowane in Rosmerkie & Robert Dunbar, son of George Dunbar of Awach £100 each to answer before King & Council 4 Nov next to a complaint made against them by Mr George Munro chancellor of Ros and said Donald Thornton, touching the breaking up of the doors of the said chancellor's house, striking him and his son, taking Margaret Levingstoun the chancellor's spouse "out of hir naiket bed" and "streking of hir" and wounding Alexander Gray, the chancellor's servant & for the alleged ravishing of the said Jonet Thornton [fol.75a].
     1602 22 June Edinburgh: Mr John McKenzie, parson of Dingwall for Robert Grahame, archdeacon of Ros, £1000 and for
John Dunbar of Windiegowlis & feuar of Awach 1000 merks, not to harm Mr Geo Munro chancellor of Ros, Mr Geo Munro his son, Don Thornton merchant in chanonry of Ros, Mr James Lauder, minister at Suddie or James Logie, servitor to Mr Geo Moncrieff [Ibid. p.733].
     1602: Complaint by James Dunbar of Lt Sudy, Archibald Falconer in Fairmylne, Robert Gellane/Gollane in Rosmerkie & Robert Dunbar, son of George Dunbar of Avach: - They are decerned to be put to the horn for not answering complaint by Mr Geo Monro, chancellor of Ros, & Donald Thornton in Chanonry of Ros, touching their assault upon the said chancellor Mr Geo Munro, his son, Margaret Levingston his spouse, & Alexander Gray his servant & for the ravishing of Jonet Thornton, daughter of said Donald (ante p.411). Now as the complainers were never lawfully charged to answer, & did not know of the charge and as they have found caution each in £100 to answer, the letters of horning should be suspended. All (except Gellane) appearing the Lords suspend the letters & order James Dunbar to find caution in 500 merks, Archibald Falconer & Robert Dunbar either in 300 merks, in respect of the non-compearance of Robt Gellane, find the Act whereby John Dunbar fiar of Avach, became surety in £100 ... The 17 May next to George Dunbar of Avach for the entry of Jonet Thornton & in the meantime continue the letter of suspension obtained by him against her father and chancellor of Ros.
     1602: Hector Munro of Foulis ... not to harm
John Dunbar, fiar of Avach, Colene, Robert & George sons of George Dunbar of Avach.
     1602 Dec 10 at Edinburgh: Caution is given by Kenneth McKenzie of Kintail (who had been admitted PC the previoius day] for James Dunbar of Lt Sudy & John Dunbar fiar of Avach in 200 merks each that by 1 Feb next they shall obtain relaxation for the following hornings used against them a the instance of Mr Geo Munro chancellor of Ros, all dated 13 Nov last viz 1. horning for non-payment of £40 contained in a protest obtained by him against them, 2. ... against James for not paying ...
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By warrant of the King, Kenneth [of Kintail] is admitted a member of the Privy Council and is sworn in, in common form, on the 9th of December, 1602. On the following day he gives caution for James Dunbar of Little Suddie, and John Dunbar, Fiar of Avoch, in two hundred merks, for their relaxation by the 1st of February next from several hornings used against them..
Crown charter of confirmation of charter, 1 and 15 February, 1607, by David, bishop of Ross, with consent, in favour of John Dumbar of Newtoun, son of George Dumbar, parson of Kilmure, of three quarters of the kirk lands of Avache and mill thereof, in the diocese of Ross and sheriffdom of Inverness. Registered Reg. Mag. Sig., vol. XLIV, 195.. Sir John Dunbar was the heir of George Dunbar in the confirmation charter dated on 19 February 1607 re three quarters of the town & land etc.. Sir John Dunbar witnessed documents on 26 March 1607 in Leith, Edinburgh. 26 March 1607 at Leith John Dumbar of Awache with M. Jeremy Lyndsay son of the said bishop witnessed deeds between George Earl of Caithness & dominie Jeanne Gordoun his wife & David Bishop of Ross.
He may be the James mentioned in the following but he seems too young and it seems to be an appointment to a clerical position: Gift by David Bishop of Ross to James Dunbar second lawful son to John Dunbar of Avach of the Chaplainries of Johns Chapel Allane Preisthill Vlatill and Drumes in the Diocese of Ross with all Lands Teinds, fruits, rents, profits, emoluments, casualties and duties whatsoever pertaining thereto during his lifetime, dated 9 July 1607. He witnessed documents in 1607/8 in Leith, Edinburgh . M. David & James Dunbar sons of the late Georgie Dunbar of Avach witnessed deeds re property of Kenneth McKenzie of Kintail. Also at Edinburgh 9 Apr 1608 Jo. Dumbar of Avache witnessed same.
The Irish planter is assumed to be the John Dunbar of Avach (Avoch, co. Ross) who enrolled for a 2000 acre share in the plantation of Ulster 25 July 1609, David Lindsay, keeper of the tollbooth of Edinburgh, his surety in £400 sterling. On the 27th July, John Dunbar was surety for Mr John Finlasoun, apparent of Killeith for 2000 acres. David Lindsay was also surety for Mr Jerome Lindsay in Leith. Mr Robert Lindsay in Leith also applied for 2000 acres. Alexander Dunbar of Egirness also applied for 2000 acres, surety George Murray of Broughton. The Irish planter is assumed to be the John Dunbar of Avach (Avoch, co. Ross) who enrolled for a 2000 acre share in the plantation of Ulster 25 July 1609, David Lindsay, keeper of the tollbooth of Edinburgh, his surety in £400 sterling. On the 27th July, John Dunbar was surety for Mr John Finlasoun, apparent of Killeith for 2000 acres. David Lindsay was also surety for Mr Jerome Lindsay in Leith. Mr Robert Lindsay in Leith also applied for 2000 acres. Alexander Dunbar of Egirness also applied for 2000 acres, The Irish planter is assumed to be the John Dunbar of Avach (Avoch, co. Ross) who enrolled for a 2000 acre share in the plantation of Ulster 25 July 1609, David Lindsay, keeper of the tollbooth of Edinburgh, his surety in £400 sterling. On the 27th July, John Dunbar was surety for Mr John Finlasoun, apparent of Killeith for 2000 acres. David Lindsay was also surety for Mr Jerome Lindsay in Leith. Mr Robert Lindsay in Leith also applied for 2000 acres. Alexander Dunbar of Egirness also applied for 2000 acres, surety George Murray of Broughton. The Irish planter is assumed to be the John Dunbar of Avach (Avoch, co. Ross) who enrolled for a 2000 acre share in the plantation of Ulster 25 July 1609, David Lindsay, keeper of the tollbooth of Edinburgh, his surety in £400 sterling. On the 27th July, John Dunbar was surety for Mr John Finlasoun, apparent of Killeith for 2000 acres. David Lindsay was also surety for Mr Jerome Lindsay in Leith. Mr Robert Lindsay in Leith also applied for 2000 acres. Alexander Dunbar of Egi[Register of the Privy Council of Scotland v.8 p.329-30,36].
     Between 1607, when John of Newtown inherited land at Avach, etc. from his father George the rector of Kilmuir, and 1621 when George of Blairfoyde alias Newtown de ... inherited the same lands from his father James of Newtown, there are no other mentions of these properties. I suspect that John sold the lands to his brother or other kinsman called James. This Newtown/Newton was near Kilcoy and not to be confused with Newtoun in Moray.
     In 1615 Malcolm Hamilton was granted 1000 acres at Monea, he had 3 freeholders and 11 leaseholders including George Dunbar [Elliott, p.50].
     Irish & Anglo Irish landed gentry when Cromwell came to Ireland / O'Hart 1884 [SOG] - The "49" Officers Dunbarr Lt David, Dunbarr, John.
     Inrolments of the abjudication (the arrears of the Commissioned Officers who served Charles II (or Chas I) in the Wars of Ireland before 5 June 1649: Wynn, Edward, Cornet Edward, Ens. Hugh; Weldon, Arthur, Bartholomew, Richard, William.
     (Archbald Ereskyn, rector of Devenish, was granted lands of Derry ... barony of Magheraboy in 1631 to be held by the incumbents on condition that they shall build substantial residences - Grant of glebes in the diocese of Clogher, membrane ( 1631 Patent & Close rolls).
      Register of Sasines, Inverness etc. Vol. 5 [1679-1684] folios 102, 198 mentions John Dunbar of Lanesborough (Lanesborrow) co. Langford, Ireland, son of George Dunbar of Knockmuir.
     The Parish of Inishmacsaint by William R Parke (Ireland, 1981): Ancient parish divided in mid nineteenth century, the following townlands are mentioned as no longer being part of the parish (presumably now part of Slavin and Garrison) Carranbeg, Carranmore... townlands still within the parish - Drumcrow E & W, Beagh, Dromore The Irish nation at home [SOG] ... 1688+ All the country houses around Lough Erne were turned into Garrisons. No papist was suffered to be at large ... [Garrison is a townland in the parish of Devenish, union of Ballyshannon].
The question is whetgerh John of Newtown is the same person.
     Paterson in Galloway lands & their owners p.461 "John Dunbarr grandson of Sir John Dunbar of Mochrum in Wigtonshire" p.306 "came to Ulster in 1615" - clearly wrong.
Collection of rent rolls, wills, and other papers relating to the families of Lord Conway, Wray of Donegal, Dunbar of Co. Fermanagh, Dobson and Richardson of Co. Dublin, Blackwood, and Humphrys of Co. Fermanagh 1611-1909. Listed in the National Library of Ireland catalogue quoting: Belfast: Belfast Public Record Office, T. 359.
27 Feb 1609 at Edinburgh: Confirmation charter of David Bishop of Ross to Roderico McKenzie, portionario de Sligo & John McKenzie, rectori de Dingwall ... Test. Joanne Dumbar de Avache, Roberto Dumbar ejus fratre... carta scripta per Rob. Dumbar. Leith 21 Jan 1609.
In 1609 a John Dunbar of Awach witnessed a charter 6 March as servitor to David, Bishop of Ross..
On 6 March 1609 John Dunbar of Awach, servitor to David, Bishop of Ross witnessed a charter.
25 July 1609 Applications for land grants in Ulster: John Dunbar of Avach co. Ross, cautioner David Lindsay, keeper of the Edinburgh tollbooth. Dunbar was also cautioner for John Finlayson apparent of Killeith co. Linlithgow [who was not granted land]. p.320: David Lindsay was also cautioner for Jerome Lindsay in Leith, co. Edinburgh.
On 23 Jan 1611 at Edinburgh: Geo Dunbar filio Georgii Dunbar de Avache witnessed document re Alex Urquhart. George junior died before his father Rev Geo!.
In 1611: In the precinct of Magheraboy: - By Sir John Home, Knt 2000 acres, Robert Hamylton 1500 acres, William Fouler 1500 acres, James Gybb 1000 acres, Jerhome Lindsey 1000 acres, Alexander Home 1000 acres, John Downebarr 1000 acres. ... Since their return from the north, one Mr Tho. Chreghton arrived and presented himself as the agent for the Lord Obigny and William Downebarr ... It is said that Downebarr [& others] are arrived themselves in the north and gone to their portions ... [Calendar of State Papers Ireland James I p.88].
     Carew mss. 1611 precinct of Magheraboy, John Downebarr,1000 acres, taken possession, returned into Scotland, and sent over 6 persons ... building in hand, 8 horses with money to provide materials.
     In 22 September 1611 it was reported by Phillip Gatisfeth in his survey that, Mr Dunbar's brother is there taking up his duties and rent but doth nothing else that I see Carew mss #68 v.630 p.113: A note on how the Plantation goes forward in Fermanagh,also reproduced by Parke p.15.
1612 Oct 20: Order to draw forth a fiant of incorporation of the town of Inishkellin, co. Fermanagh ... List appended:- ...Alexander Dunbar, with note that these are undertakers, etc.
In 1614 he leased to William Cathcart the lands of Drumcroe etc for £10 per acre/annum for 61 years.
Sir John Dunbar was granted land on 10 January 1615 in Fermanagh, Ireland, 10 Jan, 13th [1615] Grant from the King to the following persons: To John Dunbarr, esq. Fermanagh co. In Magheraboy barony - the small proportion of Drumcroe and the lands of Drumcroe 1 qr. viz. Drumcroe (means Ridge of the cattle hut), Drombocking (Drumbockeny? means Ridge of the Huts), Correclooney (Corracloon means Round hill of the meadow), Tounegowen being 4 tates. Rahaltane 1 qr, extending in the 4 tates of Rahaltane, Clonlawen, Rostagawhe and half of Tullenedall, next to Clonlawen, three fourths of Doagh qr, which extends in the parcels of Doagh, Ratonogho, Dromnemine, Rossnurbegg, Dirgonilly (Derrygonelly - means Oak grove of the O'Connellys, or candle), Mullaghclanmagie otherwise Mullaghtenegney, two thirds of the 1/2 qr of Behagh (Beagh - means Place of birch trees), next Tonagowne, which 1/2 qr extends in the parcels of Letragan (Lenigan? means wee watery palce), Lecessioghowre, and Gortagarne; total 1000 acres. ... Total rent £9 9s 4d Eng. The premises are created the manor of Dunbar with 300 acres in desmesne and a court baron. To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common socage; a power to alienate ...
     [Dromore (means Big ridge), Drumdowne (Drumadoonian? means Hill of the Little Fort), Ganwen (Ganawin alt Sandhill), Urbill, Dormarrowe, Driesternan, (now Dresterman - means Place of brambles) Rahaltan (means Rath Aldan of Aldan's Fort), Rostagawhe, Tullenadall (Tullynadell means Hill of meeting), Doagh (means dark field), Ratonogho, Dromnemine (Drumanane? - means Ridge of the Birds, Rossnurbegg, Mullaghelanagie, Lecessioghowe, Killwhum, Revagh, Shrebagh, Aglthovas, Closrogy, Tullaghstranaferne, Tullaghnasragh, Turgan, Monniscribagh, Dromnagawna and Kiltagart. Dublin Castle Jan 13 1615].
     Not all townlands in Dunbar's estate are mentioned, but it stretched from Lough Erne between Drumcrow and Blaney to the village of Garrison. This area included a vast area of mountain and contained much more than 1000 acres.
June 9 1615 at Edinburgh: Confirmation charter of George Count of Caithness & Jeanne Gordoun his spouse ... witnessed by Jeromia Lyndsay filio dict episc [David], John Dunbar de Awache ... at Leith 26 Mar 1607.
Burke claimes he was a Knight Banneret in 1616 by grant from King James I. The Crossle abstracts show him as Jp co. Fermanagh 2 Sep 1616, and Sherriff.
On 22 Feb 1617, 13 May 1628 & 2 June 1636, John Dunbar, kt, of Dunbarr, Fermanagh, was a debtor for £450. £200 & £2000 in the Irish Statute Staple books.
1618 Muster book of the Undertakers: Alexander Dunbar (did not appear personally) 1000 acres in Donegal, Barony of Boylagh; Barony of Magheraboye, Mr John Dunbare, 1000 acres. [Calendar of State Papers, Ireland James I, v.5 1615-25] Alexander's grant was sold to Sir Robert Gordon.
     Sir John Dunbar and James Dunbar were naturalized on 12 February 1618/19. 12 Feb 16 Jas I: Grant of denization to John Dunbarr, esq. Jas Dunbarr, his son, Alex. and Geo. Dunbar, Tho. Graham, Arch. Acheson of Clancarny, Pat. Acheson, his son, Jennet Acheson, otherwise Lindsey of Tullaghoge, Jas. Aughmowty of Drombarry, Edw. Maxwell of Lisdromch... Will Carcott of Crumcrowe, Will. Conningham the same... Geo Smelhome, Jerome Lindsey ... all of Scotch birth or blood, whereby they are released from the yoke of servitude of the Scotch, Irish or any other nation or blood, and entitled to enjoy all the rights of Englishmen 12 Feb 16th.
A denizen was generally a person resolved to remain in Ireland and protect himself and his acquisitions by legal process. He could use the law courts but was unqualified to held any office of trust, civil or military, and was incapable of receiving any grants from the Crown. Needless to say he was debarred from becoming a member of the Council or a Parliament. [Although denization is the word used in the grant it is known that James I conferred "naturalization".] Note that a John Dunbar of Carrickfergus (Antrim) was naturalized Nov 28, 1617.
1619 (73) Magheraboy - John Dunbarr Esq., hath 1000 acres called Drumcro. Upon this Proportion there is a bawne of lime & stone, 80 feet long, 45 broad and 14 feet high, and two watermills; himself with his wife & family remaining on the land. I find planted upon this land of British birth: freeholders, 2 viz, 2 having 120 acres le piece; Lessees, 7 viz, 1 having 180 acres, 3 having 120 acres, 3 having 160 acres le peice. The nine families have divers undertenants; but all these nine save one, are estated by promise; and are able to make 60 men with arms. Here I saw ploughs going. I saw not one Irish family on this land." N. Pynnar - Carew Mss 6, 1603-24 p.402, ed. by Brewer & Bullen. Note: There is no mention whatever of this undertaker or of his lands in the printed inquisitions of Ulster, so that no change had taken place in the ownership; neither did John Dunbar (afterwards Sir John), require to get a re-grant of his lands in 1629, owing, doubtless, to the circumstance that there had been no breach of covenants found against him. For his descent from the Earls of Dunbar, one of whom married a daughter of King Robert Bruce, see p.306. A curious evidence of this descent existed in Sir John Dunbar's house and afterward in that of Hugh Motgomery of Derrygonnelly, who married Sir John's grand-daughter. This was no other than the sword of Bruce, a family relic, which been piously preserved for many generations, and whose existence in Fermanagh, would have been probably unknown, had not William Montgomery, the author of the well-known Montgomery manuscripts, chanced to visit his kinsman's house in the year 1696. Of this visit he left record....
1622: Sir John Dunbarre hath 100 acres called Drumcrow, Upon this (Derrygonelly) there is built a bawn of lyme and stone 90 foot long, 42 foot broad, 14 foot high with 3 flankers, one 20 foot square with 3 stories high, the other round 2 stories and half high, with some small rooms in them, all thatched. There are two large English-like houses within the bawn, in length one storie and a garrett high, the other of like length of cagework, 2 stories and half high but not fully finished. Sir John & his lady with a great family are dwelling there. Some Irish tenants. The presence of the undertaker is a great comfort to the tenants unlike some of the neighbouring undertakers." [Sir Francis Annesley & Sir James Perrott's survey August 1622]. British families had grown from 9 to 17 with no Irish on the land.
In 1623 Malcolm Hamilton of Castletown, Archbishop of Cashel, supported by "Sir John Dumbar, knight, with divers other gentlemen of worth and quality in the county of Fermanagh" issued a certificate to the effect that "George Hume of Drumkose has planted all his 1000 acres with trew & honest Scottish men ... and has not retained Irish... Ditto dated at Dunbar, (Ireland) 20 May 1624..
Declaration by Sir John Dunbar of Dumbare, kt., and others, that George Home of Drumchose has performed all conditions enjoined on undertaker for plantation of 1000 acres called the small proportion of Drumchose in barony of Maghriboye, country of Farmanach.
Certificate by Sir John Dunbar, Robert Weir of Tullymargie and Gabriel Cunningham that George Hume has planted, 1,000 acres with British men in Drumchose. May 20, 1624
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1624: Barony of Touragh & proportiion of Dromer, possession of Sir John Dunbar. Tulagh O'Flanigan, servant to John Dunbar, late Dromere. No more Irish tenants. (Tuath-Rathra, now Tooraah, a territory in Fermanagh comprised in the barony of Magheraboy).
1625: Minute of petition to His Majesty ... of Eleanor Lindsay, widow to the Bishop of Ross, complaining of an alleged breach of trust by Sir John Dunbar.. Sir John Dunbar was JP and High Sheriff in 1626 & 1632 of Fermanagh.
     The Register of Sasines for Ross & Cromarty, etc. lists Sir John Dunbar of Dunbar, Co. Fermanagh (co. Armanoch, co. Fermeanoch) and his nephew George Dunbar in volumes covering 1627 to 1643.
The 1627 List of Commissions to the Counties of Ireland presumably for the raising of money for the Army - Co. Fermanagh lists: Lord Dillon, Bishop of Clogher, Sir Wm Cole, Sir John Dunbar, Sir Stephen Butler, Sir Bryan McGuire, Roger Atkinson, esq., Francis Blennerhassett esq., etc..
In 1627 he built the church at Derrygonally close to his residence and the ruins can still be seen in the old graveyard, with the coat of arms above the west door which contains the initials J D & K D and the date 1627. Crest - On a knight's helmet a bearded mans head, motto "virtus mouet, rex fouet. Below an inscription: "Triuni Deo Gloria qui liberat nos a malo. See photocopy of the stone in west wall of Derrgonelly old church co. Fermanagh 1867. Within the church is a gravestone with the same motto as above, and the inscription Here lies the bodies of Richard Dunbar etc.. A similar (but rougher) coat of arms is at Kilbarron churchyard, Ballyshannon co. Donegal. Sir Arthur Vicars of the college of arms says "It is impossible for me to give the blazon of what is cut on the stone, it is so egregiously wrong. The following is what it should have been; - Quarterly, 1 & 4th gules, a lion rampant within a bordure argent [for Dunbar], 2nd & 3rd or, three cushions within a double tressure ... counter flory gules [for Randolph] impaling - or, a mullet gules charged with a crescent argent on a chief sable three escallops of the field. In the funeral entry of Sir Richard Graham, the above arms are given in trick: vol.17 142. The two coats on the dexter side in the drawing are meant to represent the arms of Sir John Dunbar and those of Randolph, and what looks like two quarterings on the sinister side is really only one Coat, that of Graham, Lady Katherine Dunbar being a daughter of Sir Richard Greames or Graham of Lynanstown, Queens County..
     Sir John Dunbar was named in the June 1629 muster roll for Magherboy Barony, Fermanagh, Ireland. Sir John Dunbar Knight, undertaker of 1000 acres the names of his men and arms as followeth: Sword 7 Pike: 1. William Johnson, 2. John Mophet. Snaphance only: 3. John Gilmore. Sword & pike: 4. George Sheano. Sword & musket 5. Thomas Trotter. Sword and Pike: 6-7 William & Thomas Graham. Sword & Musket: 8. George Torkinton, 9. Randall Rowen, 10 Walter Johnston. 17 families were on Dunbar’s estate, 1622 (Treadwell. Irish Commission, p. 536). The number of men mustered and the weapons carried are exactly what Dunbar was required to produce for inspection, and so there were probably more settlers on the estate than the muster roll would suggest.
Between 29 July 1629 and 4 March 1630: Copy of presentment of the Grand Jury of co. Fermanagh: the jurors present William Poe of Derymore ... signed (not. hol) "Billa vera, per Johannes Dunbar, mil et socios suos". .
Sep 18 1629 Middle Temple: King James granted to Sir John Hume of North Berwick certain lands ... He has been encroached upon by his neighbours ... It is a rule of the plantation that concealed lands be distributed equally and this should be done between Sir John Hume & Sir John Dunbar, the former taking two parts, the latter one. A few other points are added. ..
Sir John Dunbar was mentioned in a sasine on 6 November 1630. Renunciation by James Dunbar and Thomas Abercrombie to James Creichton of an annual rent furth of the barony of Abercrombie: sixth November [1630] ; In anno 1617 Whereof the tennor follows: Be it known till all men by these present letters me James Dumbar eldest lawful son and apparent heir to Sir John Dumbar of Castle Dumbar, county of Fermanagh, Ireland Knight with express consent and assent of Thomas Abercrombie sometime of that ilk, brother to the late Alexander Abercrombie sometime of that ilk And also me the said Thomas for my self or assigns had hes or anyways my hand or claim In and to the annuelrent underwritten ... I the said Thomas Abercrombie by my letters obligatouris subscribed with my hand of the date the 16 day of October 1624 And for the causes onerous therein contained Band and obleist me to maintain sustain and intertain the said late Alexander Abercrombie my brother in household and family with my self in meat drink bed board and clothing and abuliaimentis during all the days of the said late Alexander his lifetime In manner mentioned in the said band And likewise to pay and deliver to the said late Alexr yearly and each year during his lifetime and during the lifetime of late Euphame Kinninmonth our guiddame [grandmother] the sum of £20 And after the decease of the said late Euphame yearly during the said late Alexander his lifetime The sum of £100 for keeping of his purse and doing his necessary affairs beginning the first years payment of the said sum of £20 within year and day next after the decease of late Thomas Abercrombie of that ilk our father And the first years payment of the said sum of £100 within year and day next after the decease of the said late Euphame Kinninmonth our guiddame And in case it should happen the said late Alexander Abercrombie to weary upon the intertenment to have been made by me And to take himself to his own intertenement in some other place Than and in that case I bind and obleis me to infeft and sais' the said late Alexander Abercrombie my brother during his lifetime In one anuelrent of three hundred merks money foresaid yearly to be upliftit and tane at tua terms in the year Whitsunday and St Martins in Winter by equal portions Furth of all and whole the lands and barony of Abercrombie parts pendicles and pertinents thereof or any part of the same land within the sherifdom of Fife To be haldin and with claus of warrandice In manner specified in said letters And to make payment of the said annuelrent alswell not infeft as infeft together with the sum of £20 foresaid of expenses for ilk terms failzie And in case it should happen me or my heirs to sell annually or put away the said lands and barony of Abercrombie to whatsumever perform or performs in any time thereafter during the lifetime of the said late Alexander Abercrombie my brother In that case I the said Thomas Abercrombie band and obleist me to pay to the said late Alexander Abercrombie his heirs or assignes the sum of three thousand merks money of this realm at the next term of Whitsunday or St Martins next and immediately following the alienation of the said lands and barony of Abercrombie To have been made by me or my foresaids Or at the least at the next term of Whitsunday or St Martins next and immediately following the decease of the said late Euphame Kynninmonth but longer delay together with the sum of £100 money foresaid of liquidate expenses In case of failzie ak the said letters obligatouris of the date above written at mair length proportis Conform to the quhilkis letters obligatouris and charter following thereupon The said late Alexander Abercrombie was duly and lawfully infeft and saisit in liferent for all the days of his lifetime In all and whole the foresaid annuelrent of three hundred merks money foresaid yearly to be uplifted as said as ak the infeftment and saising made to him thereupon at mair tenth proportis Like as the said late Alexander Abercrombie by his letters of assignation subscribed with his hand of the date 24 June 1629 Made and constitute me the said James Dumbar and my heirs cessioneris and assigns in and to the foresaid band and obligation of the date above written Containing the said sum of three thousand merks with the whole annuelrentis thereof arrears owing after the decease of the said late Euphame Kynninmonth And of all years and terms that should happen to be in arrears owing after the date foresaid of the said assignation With the said sum of one hundred pounds of liquidat expenses And to the whole heidis clauss[is] and conditions of the said band And surrogate me the said James Dumbar and my foresaids In his full right title and place of the premises for ever And like wise the said late Alexander Abercrombie by his letters of disposition and corroboration subscribed with his hand of the date 10 Nov 1629 foresaid annaliet [sell] and dispone to me my heirs and assigns whatsumever heritably the foresaid annuelrent of three hundred merks money foresaid and obleist him to infeft and sais me their until To be holden and with claus of warrandice conteaint in the said band Whereby the said late Alexr made and constitute me the said James Dumbar and my foresaid cessioneris and assigns In and to the said annuelrent of three hundreth merks of all years and terms bygaine restand [arrears] owing for the time And likewise yearly and termelie thereafter ayand quhill the lands redemption of the samen And in and to the said principal sum of three thousand merks and penalty thereof above specified Ak the said letters of assignation disposition and corroboration of the dates rexine above written at mairlenth beiris And now seeing that James Creichtoun now of Abercrombie has presently at the date hereof really and with effect made payment to us of the said principal sum of three thousand merks And of the whole byrun annuellis [interest] of the said annuelrent of three hundred merks sen the decease of the said late Euphame Kynninmonth whereof we hold us well satisfied and payit Therefore witt -e me the said James Dumbar with consent of the said Thomas Abercrombie And also me the said Thomas Abercrombie for my self and us both with one consent and assent To have exonerate quitclaim it and discharged Lyke as we be the tennour hereof Exoner quitclaim and simpliciter discharge the said James Creichtoun his heirs executors and all others whom it effeiris of the said principal sum of three thousand merks and of the said penalty of one hundred pounds And siclyk of the foresaid yearly annuelrent of three hundred merks and whole penalties thairof And of the remanent yearly duties above-mentioned And that of all years and terms alswell bygaine as to cum for well and ever And also to have renounced discharged and overgivin Lyke as we be the tennour hereof renounce discharge and simpliciter overgive fra us and other of us our heirs and assigns To and in favour of the said James Creichtoun his heirs and assigns whatsumever All and whole the foresaid annuelrent of three hundred merks money foresaid And all right title interest and claim of right quhilk we or other of us oure heirs and assigns had hes or any ways may have or claim In and to the said annuelrent and yearly duties above-mentioned of whatsumever years or terms bygaine for now and ever Quhilkis discharge and renunciation above written we bind and obleis us conjointly and severally our heirs successors and executors To warrand acquiet and defend to the said James Creichtoun and his foresaids at all hands and againes all deadly Lykes as we have instantly delivered to the said James Creichtoun the foresaids letters obligatouris made by me the said Thomas Abercrombie In favour of the said Alexander Abercrombie my brother With the charter and saising abovespecifeit following thereupon Together with the foresaid tua assignations made by the said late Alexander Abercrombie In favour of me the said James Dumbar and my foresaid of the dates rexine above-mentioned To be cuttit cancelled and destroyed or otherwise keepit and usit by the said James Creichtoun and his above written at thour ples'r in time coming And for the mair security we are content and consent that their presentis be inserted and registered in the books of council and session To have the strength of one decreet of the lords thereof that letters and executiorelles may pas hereupon by one simple charge of ten dayes only And for registering hereof constitutes Oure procurators Promitten' de rato. In witness ... Laurence Abernethy servitor to Mr Frances Hay writer to his majesties signet At Monaghan Ireland within the county of Fermanagh the 12 Sep1630 Before thir witness[es] Archibald Erskine parson of Devenish James Somerville of Tullykaller and William Hamiltoun of tully mergie Sic subscribitur James Dunbar. Thomas Abercromby. .
On 18 Sep 1632, Middle Temple: March 5 to the English Privy Council. We have received the petition of Ellinor Lindsay wife of the Bishop of Ross in Scotland wherein she protests that Sir Jerom Lindsey and Sir John Dunbar have sold to Sir William Cole 1000 acres of land in Fermanagh which she had obtained for her own use....."she had been servant to Queen Anne, and her husband had at one time been heir apparent to the Earldom of Crawford...". Feb 8 1632 Answer of Sir William Cole "20 years ago he bought 1000 acres called Dromskeagh in the barony of Magheraboy from Sir John Dunbar for 220l. Dunbar was then agent to Sir Jerome Lindsey. He got a grant from Sir Jerome and a re-grant from the King dated Dublin 6 May 1629 ...". Answer of Sir John Dunbar "Had gone to England from Scotland when the plantation of Ulster was beginning, in hope to get land. Had at the request of the Bishop of Ross tried to get 1000 acres for Mrs Lindsey. Had failed as the King absolutely refused. Petitioner had letters to this effect in her possession. Defends himself at length and says that he never made any contract or otherwise with Sir Jerome Lindsey or Sir William Cole. There were no documents to prove that plaintiffs had been wronged by anything that had taken place.
Eustace: Sir John Dunbar v Sir John Hume, 1 July 1637; ditto 4 June 1639.
     Sir John Dunbar and James Dunbar mortgaged property on 6 April 1638. Sir John Dunbarr of Dunbarr, co. Fermanagh being seized in fee of the lands of Drummenre, Aughavash, Carrenore, Carrenbegg, Edenmackgillmanaghan, Carrolagh, Knocknashanan, Tonnenura, Tonnefin, Little Corcrum, Gurtin and Scribagh, and a house in the possession of Charles Manynge, gent. situate in the barony of Magheraboy. The said Sir John Dunbar together with James Dunbar his eldest son & heir apparent, did by deed 6 April 1638 for the consideration of £500 paid them by Archibald Erskine of Errigle Kerage, co. Tyrone sell, enfeoffe and confirm sd lands to sd Archd Erskine and his heirs with provision for redemption, that the said Sir John Dunbarr and the sd James Dunbar were to pay the sd £500 to the sd Archibald Erskine on the 1 May 1641 at the Castle of Agher, and the said Sir John D and his son James D executed a penal bond in £1000 at the same time to secure said debt to A E. That A E being in actual possession of said lands did by his deed 29 Oct 1639 authorize the Bishop of Clogher, James Galbraith & Humphrey Galbraith to receive £50 yearly due to him for the interest on the said £500 out of a parcel of sd lands, being the parcel of the qr. of Kilcow, co. Fermanagh.
J Dunbarr was one of the ‘divers Lord Spiritual and Temporal, Knights, Gentlemen and others of the Scottish nation, inhabiting in the Kingdom of Ireland’, who in 1639, signed a petition to the Lord Deputy and Councilb against the ‘Covenant. .
Kirwan: John Crean v. Sir John Dunbarr, James Dunbarr, Henry Manning, Daniell Roe? McWarde?, 6 Feb 1640.
The [1641] rebels were intercepted on their way back [from the massacre at Tully Castle, Hume's home] by a combined force from Monea & Enniskillen. This action probably saved Sir John Dunbar's house and church at Derrygonelly. Sir John Dunbar's son & heir James Dunbar was in Lisgoole when it was attacked; he and a woman were the only people who managed to escape the massacre there.
In the book of Knights dubbed in Ulster Office Dublin is an entry dated 26 March 1643 of "the admission of the right worthe?: Sir John Dunbarr of Dunbarr in Ireland, Knt. "crest and mottoe as on Derrygonelly tablet. ... Arms "Az a lyon rampant A armed or, a canton or, thereon 3 cushions within a double tressure flory gules, a border A with 8 red roses proper - bound with a blue ribbon knotted".
     John died circa 1657 in Fermanagh. He probably died in 1653, but the original pedigree states 1657. He was buried in Derrygonelly, Inishmacsaint, Fermanagh, Ireland. There are arms on monumental inscription, & similar arms at Ballyshannon although these arms are sometimes ascribed to his son James.
Sir John Dunbar was mentioned in the petition of Major John Dunbar in 1664 to the King for a regrant of the family lands. Copy of petition of John Dunbarr to the King, showing that: King James I, in recognition of the loyalty of the petitioner's grandfather, Sir John Dunbarr, granted him and to others entrusted for him, the small proportion of Drumcroe [Drumcrow] and other lands in the co. Fermanagh with a proviso that if any of them should be demised or aliened to any of the mere Irish or other persons who had not taken the oath of supremacy for one year before, then the said letters patents should be void and of no effect. Petitioner prays that in recognition of his services and those of his father, Major John Dunbarr, who served at Worcester and elsewhere, the said proportion of Drumcroe and other lands in Fermanagh of which he is in possession may be granted to him. He will by such grant be better able to enjoy and improve these lands, which "lying in a mountainous country, few English can be persuaded to dwell there; and if your petitioner have not the benefit of letting the said lands to the Irish, much of the advantage thereof must unavoidably be lost". The late King granted this benefit to several persons and the benefit so granted was confirmed by Act of Parliament.
He seems too young to be the author of this petition, but it was probably done in his name by his stepfather..
     Sir John Dunbar and Anna Catherina Grubbe-Stjernfelt, Richard Dunbar and Catherine Dunbar were mentioned in a court case on 24 May 1671. Chancery bill, between Irwin pltf & Callwell & Somerville defts: Christopher Irwin of Edinburgh, Doctor of Physic, sheweth that William Cathcart of Bardonagh, co. Fermanagh, was about 1614 possessed of Dromcroe, Drumborony, Courtloone and Turnagowan in the proportion of Dromcroe, together with the barrs of the mountains in the barony of Magheraboy by lease of 61 years to him made by John Dunbar kt, at £10 per acre. About 1639 William Cathcart did sell the said lands, together with the barrs of the mountains thereto belonging for the remainder of the term for the sum of £300, paid to him by Christopher Irwin of Lowtherstown, dec. father of your orator. He further sheweth that Geo Dunbar of Braugh in the said county, gent. brother of the sd John Dunbar, being seized of one great tate of land called the Braugh, together with Killybeg and ? Comehill, being barrs of the mountains thereto belonging, did jointly with his brother John Dunbar, enfeofe Christopher Irwin of the same in 1637. Your orator's father in 1639, in consideration of the marriage of your orator, with Margaret Wishart, daughter of James Wishart of Glenteverin in the said county, settled said lands and said lease on your orator, who continued in quiet possession till the rebellion of 1641. Orator's father had some years before his death become bound to Sir Gerard Lowther for a debt of £50 due by Mary Callwell, widow, afterwards married to Henry Longford of Enniskillen, which he (Irwin) had to pay. Some controversy having arisen between Longford and himself, the whole matter was referred to Dean Bartley of Clogher, and Mr Hugh Bartley of Lifford co. Donegal, clerk, who ordered Longford to repay to Christopher Irwin, the £50, which was accordingly done, yet in 1653 Longford made his complaint to one Colonel Barrow, a colonel under the usurped powers, who committed Chr. Irwin to gaol, till he should either repay the £50, or give surety to abide by an arbitration. Thereupon Chr. Irwin did about the 10 June 1653, did engage the quarterland great tate and the premises to Henry and Mary Longford & James Callwell, son of the said Mary, with the condition that if Christopher Irwin should not bring his arbitrator, Major Hugh Ross, to Enniskillen, to end all differences between the said parties, and to stand to certain arbitrators not named in the deed, or to an umpire to be chosen, the the said deed of mortgage to remain in full force. No award was ever made; yet Henry and Mary Longford, (who took the management upon her), got possession of the said lands; and Henry being deceased, she made them over to James Callwell, who sold them to Richard Dunbar, late of Derrygonnelly, grandchild to said John Dunbar; who left the four great tates or quarterland of Drumcroe & Drumborony, Callone, Turmagowan and Barwinlahorke, with the barrs of the mountains, between Dame Anna Catherina Hamilton alias Dunbar, his widow and relict, since married to James Somerwell of Tullykelter and Catherine Dunbar, an infant of about 3 years of age, daughter of Sir Richard & Anna Catherina; and the other great tate of Braugh to William Dunbar of Kilcow, co. Fermanagh. He therefor prays that they may be put upon their title by oath etc.
     Sir John Dunbar and Catherine Dunbar, Mary Harman, Major John Dunbar, Alexander Weir and Alexander Weir were mentioned in a court case on 19 May 1674. A Chancery bill entered on 19 May 1674 between Moutray, plaintiff & Weir, defendant sheweth that Archibald Erkskin, had lent Sir John Dunbar £500 upon mortgage upon certain lands. That Ann Erskin his heir (wife of John Moutray of Aghamoyle) took out administration of her father's property. That Sir John Dunbar had never repaid the mortgage. That in 1658 Richard Dunbar 'as son & heir' of Sir John Dunbar, entered into the said mortgaged premises in Magheraboy. That said Richard died in 1666-7, and Catherine his daughter, as his heir in her right, or some others in her behalf, entered the said premises and enjoyed them and doth still enjoy them. Orator is informed that the said deed of mortgage came into the hands of Edward Weir, senior, Edward Weir, junior, Alex Arthur Weldon, Wm Dunbar, Jas Somerwell & John Dunbar or to some or one of them etc.
In the answers to the above bill, of Alexander Weir of Monaghan? co. Fermanagh and Jas Somerwell, it is stated that these defts [deforciants] believe and have heard that
John Dunbar, gent, who is son & heir of John Dunbar, deceased, who was second son of Sir John Dunbar, did immediately after the settlement in this kingdom, being then under age, by his guardian Mary Dunbar alias Veldon, his mother, enter into and always receive the rents and profits of the lands in question until he attained full age, which was about three years since: and do well know that he is in the seizin and possession of the said lands by some arrangement made by his grandfather. But they deny that Richard Dunbar or his daughter Catherine ever entered into the lands or enjoyed the rents: and that the said Catherine is not above the age of eight years. And they deny any knowledge of the mortgage of any land that came into their possession.

Children of Sir John Dunbar and Katherine Graham

Sir John Dunbar

(circa 1453 - 1503)
     Sir John Dunbar was also known as Sir John Dunbar (of Mochrum) in records. He was born circa 1453 in Scotland. He was the son of Sir Alexander Dunbar and Isobel Sutherland.
Sir John Dunbar married Margaret Dunbar (Dunbar), daughter of Patrick Dunbar, before 21 June 1474 in Scotland. By his marriage to Margaret, the second daughter of Patrick Dunbar of Mochrum, he obtained the lands of Mochrum Park. their descendants held Mochrum, Baldoon & Grange.
Sir John Dunbar married secondly Janet Stewart after 1483.
1502 ... receptis a Johanne Dunbar de Mochrum nomine Jacobi Dunbar filii et heredis quondam Jacobi Dunbar de Westfield, militis, in partem ... [Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, v.2 p.195].
12 Sep 1502 he obtained for himself and his heirs a nine year's grant of the office of Steward of Kirkcudbright and Keeper of Thrieve Castle. With this building he acquired the lands of Thrieve Grange, the fisheries of the river Dee, and the revenues belonging to the Castle, for which he engaged to pay the King £100 yearly, and to keep the fortlet at his own expense. In the following year he was killed by Alexander Gordon, younger of Lochinvar, which occasioned a feud for many years afterwards.
     John died in 1503 in Mochrum, Wigtownshire, Scotland. He was killed by Alexander, the heir apparent of Gordon of Lochinvar.
He was designated of Mochrum, Stewartry of Kirkcudbright. This line had Mochrum, Baldoon & Grange.

Children of Sir John Dunbar and Margaret Dunbar (Dunbar)

Children of Sir John Dunbar and Janet Stewart

Sir John Dunbar

(before 1480 - 9 September 1513)
      Served heir 1503. He had by Isabel Rose who later married Nicholas Tulloch, vicar of Ruthven and Dean of Moray, a daughter unlawfully born who bacame "a churchmans lady" living as sort of morganatic wife with Mr Alexander Dunbar, Dean of Moray 1503, in 1541 by whom she was mother of a natural son - Mr Alexander Dunbar 1st of Burgie & Grange, Dean of Moray, Lord of Session legitimated under Great Seal 23 June 1559.. Sir John Dunbar was also known as Sir John Dunbar (of Mochrum) in records.
Sir John Dunbar married Catherine MacLellan. Sir John Dunbar was born before 1480 in Mochrum, Wigtownshire, Scotland. He was the son of Sir John Dunbar and Margaret Dunbar (Dunbar).
     John died in battle on 9 September 1513 in Flodden, Northumberland, England.

Children of Sir John Dunbar

Sir John Dunbar

(before 1525 - before 3 March 1578/79)
     Sir John Dunbar was also known as Sir John Dunbar (of Mochrum) in records. He was born before 1525. He was the son of John Dunbar.
Under the Great Seal, he obtained from Queen Mary a Commission appointing him Justiciar within the barony of Mochrum, dated in 1545. He in 1547, got for himself and his heirs, a Commission and Charter as Coroner of the Shire. He also sat as one fo the jurors who tried the conspirators for the murder of Lord Darnley. He also acquired from the Prior of St Mary's Isle, the lands of Pankill (parish of Sorbie) in 1559. On 17 July 1549 he and his wife Elizabeth Mure had a charter of the lands of Auchingallie and Challmearich, also in the year 1562 there was a charter of the lands of Eggerness and Pankill etc. to John Dunbar of Mochrum and Elizabeth Mure his spouse.
Contract, at Kirkmadryne, between John Dunbar of Mochrum and George Makghie son and heir apparent of Blais Makghee of Eggernes. George is to be served heir to his father, as soon as Blais dies, in the 5 merk 22d worth of the 10 merkland of Eggerness and Carsquhill with its myln etc. and the superiority of a 4 merk 11/6 land of the said lands. George is then to sell the said property and superiority to John Dunbar of Mochrum and Elizabeth Mure his spouse and their heirs, to be held of the Crown in ward; for which Dunbar is to pay George 1000 merks who grants discharge to Dunbar for £80 scots and for £100, given to George before the making of this contract, in part payment of the 1000 merks; dated 3 Sep 1559.
Sir John Dunbar married Elizabeth Mure before 1560.
Charter by George Makghie of Egyrnes to John Dunbar of Mochrum and Elizabeth Mure spouses, for the sum of £200, of the mill of Egyrnes and its miln croft on the west of the said mill next the mill dam now occupied by Maurice Maknalbany and another croft occupied by Thomas Kennedy and the croft occupied by John McNalbany on the south and east of the said mill together with the mill dams, aqueducts etc. through the said 10 merklands of Egyrnes and Carswell and the multures amounting to a 1/15 grain.
     John died before 3 March 1578/79 in Mochrum, Wigtownshire.
     His will was proved on 3 March 1578/79 at Edinburgh. Sir Johne Dunbar, of Mochrum, knight.

Children of Sir John Dunbar

Sir John Dunbar

(say 1565 - 30 November 1620)
     Sir John Dunbar was also known as Sir John Dunbar (of Mochrum) in records. He was born say 1565 in Mochrum, Wigtownshire. He was the son of Alexander Dunbar and Grizel Dunbar (Dunbar) (Cunningham).
1582 Dec: Letters purchased at the instance of David Dunbar of Kynstarie, against John Dunbar of Mochrum and his tutors and curators, who have purchased letters against the said David, making mention that from the minority of the said John his lands and living are in ward, and that his mother has the greatest part thereof, and that therethrough he is destitute of all support and has been so since the decease of Alexander Dunbar of Cunzie his grandfather in Feb 1577 and that the said David, his uncle has intromitted with the same. The Lords give decreet in favour of the said David, he having consigned the sum of £200 for delivery to the said John Dunbar of Mochrum.
     He is mentioned in 1648 but was succeeded by his grandson John 18 April 1650. [Wigtonshire, p.263].
28 Feb 1582/83: Contract (registered same day) between John Dunbar of Mochrum, son and heir of deceased [Alex.] Dunbar, fiar of Mochrum, begotten between him and deceased Grizel Dunbar, his spouse, with consent of John Kennedy of Blairquhane, William Cunninghame of Caprintoun, and Thomas McAlexander of Corsclayis, his curators, on the one part, and Alexander Cunninghame of Craganis, late husband of said Grizel Dunbar, on the other part, whereby Alex. C. resigns in favour of John Dunbar certain lands in Wigtownshire.
Sir John Dunbar's heir was an unknown person in 1586. He was retoured in 1586 as heir to the barony, etc. of Mochrum.
Sir John Dunbar married Elizabeth Kennedy in 1587. She was the daughter of John Kennedy of Blairquhan.
24 Dec 1590: Letters purchased at the instance of John Dunbar of Mochrum Park, against William Dunbar in Culmalie, and John Dunbar in Orcherdsone, making mention that the said William has and bruikes the 2.5 merk land of Kiladame lying in the barony of Clagistoun and Sheriffdom of Wigton under pretence of tack and assedation made by the said John, as also the said John has and bruiks
the 5 merk land of Knohafrik lying within the parish of Kikrynner and sheriffdom aforesaid under pretence of tack and assedation. The Lords of Council decern Letters to be direct simpliciter charging the said William to produce before them the tacks and assedations alleged made by the said John and continue the action.
26 Dec 1591: Action at the instance of John Dunbar of Mochrum, against Mr Alexander Dunbar, Dean of Murray, touching the production before the Lords of Council of tack and assedation alleged made by the said John as heritor of the lands aftermentioned with consent of John Kennedie of Blairquhen, the deceased William Cunningham of Caprintown and Thomas McAlexander of Corsclayis his curators, to the said Dean his heirs and assignees of all and whole the town and lands of Kilboyak and mill thereof lying with the barony of Kinlos and Sheriffdom of Elgin and Forres, together with any other tacks of kind fishings houses mails fermes and duties whatsoever lying in the Sheriffoms of Elgin & Forres, Inverness, Banff and Aberdeen pertaining to the said John Dunbar of Mochrum through the decease of Alexander Dunbar of Cunzie his "guid schir" [grandfather] and the deceased Alexander Dunbar apparent thereof his father as heir to them, specially a tack and assidation for 19 years made by Mr Hew Craig parson of Inverkeithing to the said deceased Alexander Dunbar of Cunzie of the teind sheaves of the parsonage and vicarage of Inverkeithing. Continued till 2 Feb next.
On Nov 16 1592: Action at the instance of John Stewart son and apparent heir of the deceased Richard Stewart of Tuscherrie, against John Dunbar now of Mochrum, and William Hulden in Fairinlie bearer of the protocol books of John Halden wherein was contained contract made on 8th October 1577 between the deceased Sir John Dunbar of Mochrum, Kt., life-renter of the 2 merkland of Killiquhard lying within the barony of Mochrum Park, parish of Mochrum and sheriffdom of Wigton and the deceased Grissell Dunbar his daughter fear thereof, on the one part and the said deceased Richard Stewart the pursuers father, on the other part, by virtue of which the said deceased Grissell with consent of her said father sold and disponed heritably titule oneroso the said 2 merkland of Killiquhard to the said Richard Stewart by Charter and Sasine the which is contained in the said protocol books, of which an authentic copy is craved. Cont. till 6 Dec next [v.139 f.105]. 1592/3 Mar 1 : continued - at the instance of John Dunbar of Mochrum [v.141 f.136].
     John died on 30 November 1620 in Mochrum, Wigtownshire.
Sir John Dunbar's heir was John Dunbar on 18 April 1650. His grandson Alexander having stepped aside.

Sir John Dunbar

(before 1280 - )
      Sir John, named with his father and brothers in the compact at Turnberry in 1286, already cited, and he also appears as a witness to charters by his father and brothers.' Nothing more is known with certainty -, regarding him, unless he be the Sir John Dunbar, late of Birkenside, who is named in a charter by his son John Dunbar, to the monks of Dryburgh, the (late of which is not given.' But if this be so, his male issue must have failed before 1368, as his grand nephew George succeeded to the earldom.


. Sir John Dunbar was born before 1280. He was the son of Patrick (III) Dunbar 7th Earl and Cecilia Fraser?

Sir John Dunbar

(before 1410 - after 1437)
     Sir John Dunbar was also known as Sir John Dunbar (of Cumnock & Mochrum) in records. He was born before 1410. He was the son of Sir Patrick Dunbar.
     John died after 1437 in Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland.

Children of Sir John Dunbar

Sir John Dunbar

(circa 1304 - before July 1368)
     Sir John Dunbar was born circa 1304. He was the son of Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl and Ermengarde de Soulis.
     John died before July 1368. According to Boece, who seems to have known something of the family history, Earl Patrick and Black Agnes had no children,although, as stated, children are referred to in the Papal dispensation, probably as a matter of form. But, probably by his first wife, the Earl had issue,
Sir John, who is named in the list of hostages for King David II in 1351, and there is described as son and heir of the Earl of March. He is also referred to, but not by name, in the list of 1354, but he is not referred to in the final list of 1357. He also appears in charters of uncertain date, but before 1346, as Sir John, son of the Earl of March, and he had then received the rank of knighthood.' Nothing further has been ascertained regarding him, and he must have predeceased his father without issue, as his cousin George succeeded
.

John Dunbar 1st (4th) Earl of Moray

(before 1354 - before 15 February 1391/92)
     John Dunbar 1st (4th) Earl of Moray was born before 1354 in Scotland. He was the son of Sir Patrick Dunbar and Isabella Randolph.
Cokayne states: John de Dunbar, younger brother of George (de Dunbar), Earl of March or Dunbar [S.], being 2nd son of Sir Patrick de Dunbar (nephew of Patrick, Earl of March and Dunbar and Moray [S.], abovenamed), by Isabel, younger. of the two daughters and coheirs (her issue before Nov. 1368 becoming sole heir) of Thomas (Randolph), 1st Earl of Moray [S.], abovenamed, was probably the John Dunbarre, vallet, who was in London in June 1369 with Master John de Carrick, Lord Privy Seal [S.], and other commissioners for the truce, and who swore, among the esquires present, to its observance at Edinburgh in July following. He was cr. Earl of Moray [S.] by his father-in-law, King Robert 11, 9 Mar. 1371/2. As Earl he swore to observe the Act of Settlement in the Parl. at Scone, 4 Apr. 1373; in Dec. 1381 he and his brother, the Earl of Dunbar, had safe conducts to pass through English dominions with 50 men and horses; he was chief of the Scottish commission which, in July 1384, met the English in Ayton church (near Berwick) to arrange terms of the truce. He fought at the battle of Otterburn, 10 Aug. 1388, and in July 1390 was a joint conservator of the truce on the Marches. In April 1390, following the example of several other Scottish knights who came to England to do feats of arms, he obtained a safe conduct for two months, to perform certain feats of arms to which he had challenged the Earl Marshal of England; in May received a considerable gift from Richard II and further protection; in June licence to journey to St John of Amiens, and in Dec. licence to remain in England for 6 months, afterwards prolonged to Mich. He married (disp. II July 137O) the Lady Marjorie Stewar, daughter of Robert II [S.], by his 1st wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan. He died before 15 Feb. 1391/2. His widow married before 24 Apr. 1403, Sir Alexander KEITH of Grandown. She was living 6 May 1417.
Records of Elgin p.16 - Protest against John de Dunbar, Earl of Moray re port of Spynie, 1369-94.
     The King also granted the Earl a pension of £100 furth of the customs of Elgin & Forres. On 1 May 1390 the Earl remitted the assise of ale to the Burgh. [Elgin records, p.17].
     
Paul states: DUNBAR, EARL OF MORAY. The earldom of Moray did not revert to the full possession of the Crown until after the death of Patrick, ninth Earl of Dunbar, in or about July 1368. On 9 March 137172 the earldom was re-granted to John Dunbar, second son of Sir Patrick Dunbar and Isabella Randolph, younger sister of John Randolph, third Earl of Moray. The new Earl was thus a grandson of the famous Randolph, but the territory was lessened by the districts of Lochaber and Badenoch, with the castle and barony of Urquhart, being deducted from the original grant, as also the gift of the great customs. The earldom was granted to John Dunbar and Marjorie Stewart, and to the longer liver of them, and their heirs, whom failing, to George Dunbar, Earl of March, and his heirs whomsoever. Nothing is known of John Dunbar's history before the death of King David II, except a notice on 21 June 1370 which seems to imply that he had been one of an embassy to England, apparently as 'vallet' or squire of Sir Robert Erskine.' After the accession of King Robert II. he and Sir Robert, with others, opposed the Earl of Douglas In his claim to the crown and persuaded him to agree to the coronation of the new King. He swore to maintain the settlement made of the crown on the Stewart family in 1373. He had on 26 August 1375 a grant of the thanage of Kintore, and of other lands at a later date, in the beginning of the reign of King Robert III. He had also pensions of £100 from the customs of Elgin and Forres, and the same sum from Aberdeen. In December 1379 his merchants and retainers were accused of plundering a wrecked vessel, laden with 'Skoone' herrings (probably from 'Schoueden' in Holland), and the owners were allowed to plunder a Flemish vessel in turn. He had a safe-conduct to England 15 December 1381. He was one of the Commissioners named in the treaty with England and France 7 July 1384, and of the money brought by Sir John de, Vienne from France the Earl received 1000 gold francs as his share. In the Parliament of April 1385 he complained of attacks and murder done on two of his vassals, a complaint which the Earl of Buchan was directed to inquire into, and to do justice. He was one of the Scottish nobles who took an active part against England, and a joint leader with the Earl of Douglas in the expedition which ended at Otterburn in August 1388. One chronicler says that the attack by Percy on the Scottish camp was so sudden that the Earl of Moray fought the greater part of the time without his helmet. He had a serious dispute with the Bishop of Moray, many complaints being made on both sides. The disputants appeared before the Regent Albany and others at Inverness 27 October 1389, and a decree was given settling the questions between them. He was present in January 1389-90 when his son undertook to defend the Bishop's territories, and on 13 August 1390 he and his brother-in-law, Alexander, Earl of Buchan, were specially forbidden to deal in any way with the bishop's castle of Spynie. He was still at Elgin on 1 May 1390, a date which, connected with various safe-conducts to and from England, for dates running between 16 March 1389-00 and 13 June 1391, has an Important bearing on the question of his death. It is usually stated that the Earl went to England to fight a duel with Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham, Earl Marshal, whom he had challenged. It is then added that he was wounded, and died at York on his way home. This story is found in a ms. Appendix to Higden's Polychronicon and in Caxton's continuation of Higden, with variations. The earlier story is that on 28 May (year not stated) the Earl of Nottingham and the Earl of Moray ran courses with sharp lances, and because the former held himself so much better than the Scottish Earl, praise was awarded to him. This is a simple narrative, but Caxton's is fuller and less complimentary to Moray. He says the Earl of Moray challenged the Earl Marshal to joust with sharp spears. They ran together, but not their full courses, as the Scottish Earl 'was cast, both horse and man, and two of his ribs broken with the same fall, and so borne home in to his inne, and anon after was carried homeward in a littyer and at York he diet.' The incident is said to have taken place in 1394, but this is a mistake, and the statements made as to the Earl's death are not borne out by the available evidence. The Earl received a safe-conduct on 16 March 1389-90 to fight the Earl of Nottingham, the conduct to be valid between 15 April and 20 June 1390, but, as indicated, he did not leave Scotland before 1 May, when he was in Elgin. On 30 May 1390 he had similar letters permitting passage to and fro in England, and on that day, or a few days before, having 'lately come' to England to joust with Nottingham, lie received from King Richard 200 marks sterling in money and a silver cup and ewer with gilt cover, in all, the sum of £139, 11s. 1d. sterling, Sir David Lindsay, Sir William Dalziel, and other Scottish knights also receiving gifts. On 10 June 1390 he had a safe-conduct to go on pilgrimage to the shrine of St. John of Amiens,' while, as stated, he is referred to on 13 August and 28 September as in Scotland. On 30 December same year he was apparently again in England, and on 13 June 1391 he had another safe conduct to go there. This is the last notice of him in life, and he was dead before 15 February 1391-92, when his son is styled Earl of Moray. He may have died at York, but the evidence that it was the result of wounds is insufficient.
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John Dunbar 1st (4th) Earl of Moray married Marjory Stewart, daughter of Robert, II Stewart, King of Scotland and Elizabeth Mure, after 11 July 1370. The Earl married (in terms of a Papal dispensation dated 11 July 1370 [1371?]) his cousin Marjorie, a daughter of Robert, Earl of Strathearn, afterwards King Robert II, who survived him. She married, secondly, between 1391 and 1403, Sir Alexander Keith of Grandown, as appears from a Papal indult to him and her on 24 April 1403 to choose a confessor. She may have been the mother of Sir Alexander's daughter Christian, who married, about 1413, Sir Patrick Ogilvy (see title Airlie), but this is not certain. Her seal shows 'a lion rampant within a royal tressure.'
Dispensation by Pope Urban V, 11 July 1371. John was created Earl of Moray by his father-in-law King Robert "to our beloved son John Dunbar and Mariot his spouse our dearest daughter" on 9 March 1371/72.
Charter by George Dunbar, earl of March and lord of Annandale adn Man, to Sir John Edmundiston, kt, re land at Smale, etc. Witnessed by John Dunbar, earl of Moray, granter's brother.
Indenture between John Dunbar, earl of Moray, and Hugh Ross, laird of half the lands of Kynfaunis, whereby said Hugh resigns to said John his lands in earldom of Caithness with the castle of Dunbeth. At Edinburgh, 30 December 1387.
He fought at Otterburn in 1388.
     John died before 15 February 1391/92 in York, Yorkshire. He died after 13 June 1391 (when he again had safe conduct) but before 15 Feb 1391/2 when his son was Earl of Moray. He died from injuries sustained in a tournament where he was unhorsed by the Earl Marshal of England.

Children of John Dunbar 1st (4th) Earl of Moray and Marjory Stewart

John Adolphus Dunbar

(19 January 1890 - 12 November 1959)
     John Adolphus Dunbar was born on 19 January 1890 in Sale, Cheshire. He was the son of Edward Dunbar and Mary Jolley. John Adolphus Dunbar was christened on 21 February 1890 in St Anne, Sale, Cheshire. John Adolphus, privately baptised 21 Feb 1890, son of Edward & Mary Dunbar, of 17 South Grove, leather merchant. He was listed in the 1891 census with Edward Dunbar in Davenport Ave, Withington, Chorlton, Lancashire.
John Adolphus Dunbar served in the military He wa of Bracken Villa, B.. Altincham, aged 25 years , 11 months, clerk when he enlisted. #92409 Bdr Dunbar, PGA. A note stated the dependant of the above solder Mrs A E Brown, Barrington Rd, Altrincham, died 26 *, 18. The next of kin is Miss L Evans, 104 Ashlet Rd, Hales, Altrincham; inlcudes the death certificate of Annie Elizabeth St Aubyn Brown. on 2 December 1915.
John Adolphus Dunbar married Lilly Evans on 30 October 1918 in Bowden, Cheshire.
     John Adolphus Dunbar was recorded in 1939 census in 65 Parsonage Rd, Manchester, Lancashire. John A Dunbar, born 19 Jan 1890, Estate office manager, Lilly Dunbar born Oct 4 1894 aged 94 unpaid domestic duties, a closed record- presumably a child, William Evans, born 6 May 1863m widowed, Joiner, retired.
     John died on 12 November 1959 in Hale, Cheshire, aged 69. He was buried on 16 November 1959 in Manchester.
     His will was proved on 6 January 1960 at Manchester. John Adolphus Dunbar of 62 Beech Rd, Hale, Cheshire died 12 Nov 1959. Probate: Manchester 6 January to John Killigrew Dunbar hospiital administrator Effects £1147.

Rev John Archibald Dunbar

(8 October 1849 - 11 November 1905)
     Rev John Archibald Dunbar was born on 8 October 1849 in Sea Park, Kinloss, Moray. Birth, at Seapark, on Sunday the 7th ult, the Lady of Captain Dunbar Dunbar, of a son and heir. He was the son of Edward Dunbar Dunbar.
     John died on 11 November 1905 aged 56. He died without issue having married Louisa Cambray. He was a well-known philatelist.

John Charles Killigrew Dunbar

(1881 - 14 September 1934)
     John Charles Killigrew Dunbar was commonly known as Charles. He was born in 1881 in Dandenong, Victoria. He was the son of John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar and Margaret Ann Green.
     Charles served in the Army between November 1915 and 1919. He stated on enlistment that he was born at Dandenong, Victoria and that he was 35 years of age. He enlisted at Chermside Qld on 11 Nov 1915, allotted Army Number 2489 and the rank of trooper. Appointed shoeing smith on 12 November 1915. Embarked at Sydney for the Middle East with 7th squadron 2nd Australian remount Unit per HMAT "Orontes" on 20 November 1915. Promoted to Corporal on 17 June 1916. Admitted to the 14th General Hospital at Abbassia, sick, on 23 September 1916. Taken on strength of Details Camp at Moascar on 10 October 1916. Taken on strength of the 10th Light Horse Regiment on 18 December 1916. To rest camp at Port Said on 28 August 1917. Rejoined unit on 9 September 1917. Embarked for Australia per HT "Oxfordshire" at Kantala on 10 July 1919. Disembarked at Melbourne 13 Aug 1919 for onward movement to Brisbane where discharged 5 Oct 1919. Issued with the 1914/15 Star, British War Medal, & Victory Medal. He nominated his sister, Jean Dunbar of Pinshurst, Victoria as next of kin on his enlistment. http://hdl.handle.net/10070/226480.
     John and Philip were registered as Charles Killigrew Dunbar, blacksmith & Philip O'Brien Dunbar, mechanic at 24 Ellingworth Pde, Box Hill, Victoria, on the 1919 electoral roll.
John Charles Killigrew Dunbar married Miriam Gregg in 1930 in Sydney, New South Wales.
John Joseph Dunbar met him in 1931 at Logans, considered taking JJD to the West with him. He was a blacksmith at Tocumwal; later went prospecting in New Guinea & WA. No more was ever heard of him. He was 6'8" tall however his service record gives his height as 5'11".
     John died of heart attack when tying up his shoes on 14 September 1934 in Carlton, Victoria. Dunbar. Sudddenly, at Melbourne, Charles John Killigrew Dunbar, late 10th Light Horse, AIF. loved husband of Miriam Dunbar, 20 Dalgety Street, St Kilda, late Darlinghurst.

John Handy Killigrew Dunbar

(19 April 1829 - 31 August 1853)
     John Handy Killigrew Dunbar was christened on 19 April 1829 in Bundoran, Inishmacsaint, Fermanagh/Donegal. He was the son of Rev John Dunbar and Frances Holmes Halahan.
     John died on 31 August 1853 in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, aged 24. The Londonderry sentinel reported on the14 Oct 1853: On the 31st August, at New Orleans, of yellow fever, John H Killigrew Dunbar, fourth son of the Rev John Dunbar, Rector of Ballybay, county Monaghan.
This man may be the progenitor of the USA Dunbars with similiar DNA, but if a missionary seems unlikely?
The Belfast chronicle 12 Oct 1853 also reported the death of John Handy Killigrew of New Orleans ....

John Henry Dunbar

(5 January 1882 - 29 December 1969)
     John Henry Dunbar was born on 5 January 1882 in Ipswich, Queensland. He was the son of Frederick Killigrew Dunbar and Harriet Ledger.
John Henry Dunbar married Florence Beatrice Buckenham on 17 October 1906 in Ipswich, QLD.
     John and Florence were registered as John Henry Dunbar, clerk anfFlorence Beatrice, domestic duties. In 1909 they lived on the Liverpool Estate, North Ipswich and in 1910 they were at Stanton Cross at Ipswich, QLD, on the between 1908 and 1909 electoral roll.
     John was registered as John Henry Dunbar, clerk at Stanton Cross, Ipswich district, Queensland, on the 1910 electoral roll.
     John died on 29 December 1969 in St Leonards district, New South Wales, aged 87.

Children of John Henry Dunbar and Florence Beatrice Buckenham

John Joseph Desmond Dunbar

(10 December 1919 - 23 July 1994)
John Joseph Desmond Anthony Killigrew Dunbar (1919-1994)
     John Joseph Desmond Dunbar was born on 10 December 1919 in Box Hill, Victoria. He was brought up by his aunts after his mother's death in December 1932 when he was aged 13. He was the son of George Thomas Killigrew Dunbar and Margaret Mary Cullen.
     John served in the Army (VX11324) between 1940 and 1946. He enlisted at South Melbourne on 14 Feb 1940, giving his locality as Birchip and naming his father as next of kin. He served during World War II in the 2/6 Div, 2/6 battalion (17th Brigade) as a private soldier. He sailed for Palestine 13 April 1940 and served in the Middle East & Egypt then to Greece. He was taken prisoner there by German paratroopers. Imprisoned in Corinth, Salonica then to Stalag 18a at Wolfsburg (Karnton) Austria and assigned to work camps (32 in total). He escaped and was recaptured 3 times. Imprisoned at stalag 317 Markt Pongau (St Johann) until the Americans arrived in May 1945. Details to be added later. He was among the last European POWs to arrive back in England. On the 14th June 1945 VX11324 Pte J Dunbar, Australian Forces, was directed "to proceed from Westminster Hospital SW1 to 2nd 6th Btn, AIF Gloucester Club, 22 Sloane Gardens SW1 on Friday 15th June by 1300 hours". He arrived home via the "Mauritania" in early August, a week before the war ended in the Pacific. He was sent to Repatriation hospital, Heidelberg, then to Rockingham to convalesce and was discharged from the Army in Jan 1946.
UK Prisoner of War records list ihim in WO392/2 & WO 392/12 (Germany) series. John was a carpenter in 1946. On his return from the War he took a rehabilitation course as a coach builder. He did an apprenticeship in coach-building, working for Kellow-Falkiner, and studying at RMIT. He later worked as a cabinet maker/carpenter for builders.
     John resided at 5 Salisbury Street, Coburg East, between 1950 and 1958. He met Mum while living in Hawthorn in 1949.
Mary Phyllis MacKenzie married secondly John Joseph Desmond Dunbar on 24 September 1952 in the Registry Office, Melbourne, Victoria. They were of 5 Salisbury Street, Coburg.
     John resided at 14 Kirbister Street, Pascoe Vale, between 1958 and 1994.
     John resided at 22 St Andrew's Road, Shepparton, between 1969 and 1970. He was working in the district as a builder for Leighton Homes.
     John died of cancer on 23 July 1994 in his home, 14 Kirbister Street, Pascoe Vale, Victoria, aged 74. He was cremated on 26 July 1994 in Fawkner Crematorium. His ashes were later scattered in the country near Pyalong.
     His will was proved on 12 December 1995 at Victoria.

John Killigrew Dunbar

(28 December 1838 - 21 March 1913)
     John Killigrew Dunbar was born on 28 December 1838 in Bellary, Karnataka, Madras Presidency, India. He was the son of Capt Frederick Dunbar and Emma Kane. John Killigrew Dunbar was christened on 2 January 1839 in Bellary.
     John Killigrew Dunbar and Frederick Killigrew Dunbar arrived with George Killigrew Dunbar and Capt Frederick Dunbar on 13 December 1842 at Victoria, Australia.
     John resided at Clarence River, New South Wales, from about 1845.
     John Killigrew Dunbar was listed with Capt Frederick Dunbar on the passenger list of the "Christina" arriving at Sydney on 31 October 1846. Capt Dunbar, Mr John Dunbar, Mr Frederick Dunbar, from Melbourne.
John Killigrew Dunbar moved to Queensland circa 1880.
He was mentioned in his father's letters and was accused of setting fire to a neighbour's crop as part of his father's grievances.
A J Dunbar held 830 acres of land and 15 horses, 6 cattle and 1400 sheep at Cooroora near Goonoo Goonoo in NSW in 1885. He left no issue..
John K Dunbar wrote again to the Immigration Agent re his father's application for admission to the Dunwich Asylum ... he has got so very bad that he could not stand the journey down. For it is with great difficulty that I can move him at all, even from the bed to the chair or even to turn him over in the bed ... so weak and I really think it would kill him to shift him in the state he is at present .... some late time when he .... stronger and able to stand the journey. I might take him down with me... Thank you for your kindness... John K Dunbar.
     John resided at Eight Mile Plains, Queensland, from about 1898. He was admitted to Dunwich, Queensland, on 15 January 1901. The Dunwich Asylum records: John Killigrew Dunbar aged 62, was admitted Jany 15 1901, from Eight Mile Plains, cause of admission - Rheumatism, Born Bellary, India, religion CE, trade - labourer, education: R & W, Father: Frederick Dunbar, Capt 39th Regt, mother - Emma Kane; not married, no children. History: Came to Australia 1841, resided in Melbourne, there 12 months, then to Sydney, their 12 months & then to Clarence River in.... Then to Queensland 20 years on various stock man or horse.... in Rosewood district. Last 2 years in Tiviot Junction, Eight Mile Plains looking after horses. No money, no property, no relatives.
     John was registered at Dunwich on the between 1903 and 1913 electoral roll.
     John died on 21 March 1913 in Queensland, Australia, aged 74.

John Killigrew Dunbar

(12 April 1816 - 11 May 1828)
     John Killigrew Dunbar was born on 12 April 1816 in Dublin, Ireland. He was the son of Rev John Dunbar and Frances Holmes Halahan. John Killigrew Dunbar was christened on 23 April 1816 in St Peter, Dublin.
     John died on 11 May 1828 in York St, Dublin, aged 12. On the 11 inst in York St, John Killigrew Dunbar, eldest son of Rev John Dunbar, aged 12 years & 1 month.

Major John Killigrew Dunbar

(16 May 1769 - 19 February 1854)
     Major John Killigrew Dunbar was born on 16 May 1769 in Dublin, Ireland. He was later described as the step-brother of Earl of Normanton. He was the son of George Dunbar and Martha St Aubyn. Major John Killigrew Dunbar was christened on 15 June 1769 in St Mary, Dublin. John, son of Geo: Dunbar, Esq & Martha his wife. He was mentioned in a conveyance of property on 5 February 1780. Articles of agreement dated 5 Feb 1780, made between George Dunbar of the one part, and William Hamilton of the other part, the said George Dunbar did grant, etc, unto the said William Hamilton and to his heirs and assigns, the town and lands of Carrins, Drimanure, Rusheen, Gortins, Garrison, and Trevagh, together with the Mills of Garrison, and the toll, and sucken, and mulcture thereof, and the yearly coming, arising and growing, due in and out of all and every part and parcel of the Manor of Kilcoo, in the county of Fermanagh; and all the water and watercourses to the said mills, or either of them belonging, together with the tolls and customs of the fairs and markets of Garrison, situate in the Manor of Kilcoo, co Fermanagh. To hold to the said William Hamilton his heirs and assigns, for ever, subject to the yearly rent of £152 10/-. By deed of partition dated 31 Jan 1839 ... payable out of the said lands to the Representatives of the late George Dunbar.
     John was educated from from 31 March 1783 to 1787 at the Quaker School, Ballitore, Kildare. He left the Ballitore Quaker School soon after the death of his mother in 1787 at Griesebanks, Ballitore, Kildare. Master J K Dunbar was a subscriber to "The history of Ireland" by Wm Crawford published 1783.
     He served as a Major in the British Army from 26 Dec 1787. He was appointed Ensign 63rd Regt 26 Dec 1787-1789 (applications for commissions commence 1793), Lt John K Dunbar 69th Regt (Sth Lincs) 30 Sep 1790; Capt 69th 1793-99 31 Oct 1792, Major 83rd 1800-c1807. 1794 Capt John Cane Dunbar 69th Regt (Sth Lincs); [Army lists]. 1800 Major J Killigrew Dunbar 1 Jan 1800 69th &. To be majors in the Army - J K Dunbar 31 Oct 1792 69th Regt [WO31/92, Commission applications not listed 12 Mar 1801 WO31/107]; 1801 12 March to 83rd Regt of Foot Ja Killigrew Dunbar; 1803 Maj J Killigrew Dunbar [SLV Army list]. He was not listed in the 1806, 1809 & 1811 Army lists.
     The 83rd (Co. of Dublin) Regiment was raised in 1793 by Col. W Fitch, from 1795 to 1823 it was commanded by Col. Balfour as the 83rd Regiment. It is now known as the Royal Irish Rifles..
     Major John Killigrew Dunbar was mentioned in a deed dated 22 December 1790. George Dunbar of Ballycarney, co. Carlow, but then of Dublin City, Esq & John Killigrew DunbarEsq, only son & heir apparent of George, for the considerations and purposes mentioned assigned to George Whally of St Bancorss [Pancras?], Mdx the personal fortune of Martin Killigrew, deceased, in Great Britain £7505 for the purposes mentioned. Robert Weir Esq, of Dublin, was mentioned along with Charles Kiligrew deceased, late of Cg=harles St, St James, Westminster.
     Major John Killigrew Dunbar and Helena Nash obtained a marriage licence on 19 September 1795 in Dublin. He was described as of Fermanagh and she was from the parish of St Thomas in Dublin.
Major John Killigrew Dunbar married Helena Nash, daughter of Andrew Nash and Margaret Drew, on 25 September 1795 in St Thomas Church of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. An unknown person was listed as Captain J Killigrew Dunbar,the 69th (Sth Lincs) Regiment in a directory dated in 1798.
Major John Killigrew Dunbar served in the military when he was appointed a Major in the 83rd Regiment of Foot. He was stationed at Deal on 1 January 1800. The Hampshire telegraph on 13 Jan 1800 reported Captains... J Killigrew Dunbar, of the 69th ditto. They were obviously stationed in Jamaica as evidenced by the baptism of his daughter Margaret there. The Regiment was ordered back to England in 1802..
83rd [Regt], Brevet Major J. Killigrew Dunbar, from the 69th Foot, to be Major, vice White, deceased.
According to EHV Dunbar in a letter to John K Dunbar dated 9 Jan 1911 the first step taken by the Major on leaving the army in 1804 was to serve a writ of ejectment on Lord Loftus to quit a property in Devonshire ....
     Major John Killigrew Dunbar was party to a land transaction on 10 June 1805 in Kilcoe/Kilcoo?, Fermanagh, Ireland. Lease and release dated 10 June 1805 made between John Killigrew Dunbar, Major in HM 8th Register of Foot & Robert Weir of the city of Dublin, Esq., where JKD granted, bargained, sold, assigned & released unto Robert Weir ... the town and lands of Slatnagh / Slahnaigh situate in the manor of Kilcoe & co. Fermanagh ... to Robert Weir ... subject to the annual rent of £45.. He was widowed on 29 March 1806 on the death of his wife Helena Nash.
     John resided at Jersey, Channel Islands, UK, 1807.
     John was a plaintiff in a civil court case between 1807 and 1813. Dunbar v. Weir & Tredennick, 1807 cited in following case: May 18-19 1813 High Court of Justice (Ireland), Chancery Division: Major J K Dunbar, plaintiff, Tredennick deft: Plaintiff seeks to record possession of a certain manor of Kilcoe, co. Fermanagh & to have set aside certain fee farm grants totalling about 700 acres conveyed by his father Major George Dunbar & himself to R Weir, his attorney & agent, plaintiff alleging that the ... of ... had been obtained by ... by fraud. Plaintiff also claims an account of rents received ... under a deed of 11 December 1792, executed by plaintiff (having come of age in 1790) his father (Major George Dunbar) ... & ... all the English estates vested in ... had been sold but the proceeds had not (May 1813) been remitted by the English agents & until the costs had been ascertained the residue would not be remitted.
In 1792 plaintiff being ordered abroad with his regiment, with his father executed the said deed to Weir, but did not appreciate its significance. He remained abroad until 1807 (being at Jersey that year) when his father died and he returned to England. Meanwhile for £3400 Weir had conveyed the manor to defendant Tredennick. Plaintiff looked into the circs (circumstances?) of the execution by himself and his late father of the deed of conveyance to Weir & was allege... was obtd from him & his father by fraud.
Held that ex... to deed of 11 Dec 1792 was obtd by fraud by Weir, that plaintiff was entitled to recover possession and an account against defendant and all costs.
N.B. Robert Weir was said to be an illegitimate son of Major Geo Dunbar.
Ball & Beatty reports: Chancery, Ireland 1807-1814. Printers. R Milliken (Dublin), H Butterworth, 7 Fleet St London. Vol. printed 1824
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     John resided at Clanbrassil Avenue, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, from 1808 to 1822. He was living in the parish of St Peter's Dublin from 1808 to 1822; 1817-1822 the Clanbrassil Ave, Dublin is address given in St Peter's register. 1822 directory Maj Dunbar, 1 Clanbrassil Place, Dublin. But at his son George's entry to Kings Inns in 1817, he was described as of Garrison, co. Fermanagh.
Saunder's newsletter on 28 April 1810 advertised a 'Caution': John Killigrew Dunbar Esq. against Robert Weir, solicitor and others: Having been informed that measures are taking for disposing of the landed and other property of Robert Weir, late of Capel-street, in the city of Dublin, Attorney, a defendant in this cause; I hereby give this public notice, that I have obtained a conditional decree, on sequestration in this cause, in the Court of Chancery, against the said Robert Weir, which I am proceeding to enforce; wherof all persons concerned are desired to take notice. Dublin April 27 1810. John K Dunbar.
Letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, Dublin, dated 9 Oct 1815 to John Charles Maude about Dunbar-Archdall family connections exists in the Publiic Record Office of Northern Ireland.
Major John Killigrew Dunbar married Jane Mary Vivian circa 1821. Having cohabited or been married under other laws. In 1911 E H V Dunbar wrote the story is not a savoury one. It would seem that my grandfather married his second wife firstly with French, Jersey or Scotch law, and secondly some years before my father was born, he again married her with Church of England rites. At any rate, she had her jointure out of the Garrison estate, I lived with her until 1864. Only Henry H V was able to inherit from the Killigrew estate, the elder children by the second marriage being considered illegitimate. Joyce gives 1806 as a marriage date.
He was a magistrate for county Fermanagh 1821-1826, also 1831-32. Major John Killigrew Dunbar was summoned for jury duty on 13 September 1821 in Fermanagh. Grand Jury, Fermanagh Assizes, led by Hon Justice Barton.
The Parliamentary report of the Commissioner for relief of the poor in Ireland under Fermanagh shows: Paid Major Dunbar, for district of Lough Melve, 16 July 1822 £30.
Major John Killigrew Dunbar was listed in a directory dated 1823 as Major Dunbar at 1 Clanbrassil place, Dublin.
Papers relative to building church in parish of Devenish, in county of Fermanagh: re-building of a Parish Church, or Chapel of Ease, at Garrison, in the parish of Devenish ; addressed to John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq.
No. 1. Copy of a memorial from several of the inhabitants of the Protestant inhabitants of Kilcoe in the parish of Devenish, respecting the rebuilding of a praish chuch or chapel of ease
N° 2.—Copy of a Letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq. to the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Clogher; dated Clanbrassel Place, 31st March 1823.
N° 3.—Copy of a Letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq. to the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Clogher; dated 9th April 1823.
N° 4.—Copy of a Letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq. to the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Clogher; dated Garrison House, 21st June 1823
No 5.—Copy of a Letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq. to the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Clogher ; dated 29th January 1823.
John Killigrew Dunbar of Garrison of was High Sheriff of Fermanagh in 1823 and again in Dec 1824.
Scott et al against Dunbar & Kane: Upon reading the petition and appeal of Archibald Scott of Garrison, co. Fermanagh, gentleman, and Barbara Scott, ootherwise Hamilton, his wife; the Rev Andrew Young of Garrsion, clerk, and Mary Ann Young otherwise Hamilton, his wife; Thomas Saunders of the city of Dublin, gentleman and Jane Suanders otherwise Hamilton, his wife; and William Alexander Graydon, a minor under the age of 21, by Charles John Graydon of said city, gentleman, his father and next firend, complaining of 2 decrees of orders of the court of Chancery in Ireland, on the 4th & 16th of July 1821; and praying that the same might be reversed, that the appellants mayhave such rrelief in the premises, as to this House ... shall seem meet; and that John Killigrew Dunbar of the City of Dublin, Esquire, and John Daniel Kane, now of Mountjoy Parade in the county of Dublin, Esquire, may be required to answer the said appeal.
It is ordered that the said KJD and JDK may have a copy of the said appeal, and do put in their answer or respective answers thereunto in writing, on or before Friday 11 March next.
Scott et al against Dunbar & Kane... Upon reading the Petition of John Killigrew Dunbar and John Daniel Kane, respondents in a Cause depending in this House, to which Archibald Scott and others ....have not been delivered.
John K Dunbar was listed as member of the Grand Jury for the Enniskillen Assizes in July 1823.
Published in the Parliamentary Papers 1824: Papers relative to building a church in the parish of Devenish, in county of Fermanagh... respecting the re-bilding of a second church, or Chapel of Ease, near the village of Garioch in said parish ...
... Copy of a letter from Right Rev the Bishop of Clogher tothe Rt Hon Henry Goulbourn, inclosing: -
1. Copy of a memorial from several of the Protestant inhabitants of Kilcow, in the parish of Devenish, respecting the re-building of a parish church, or Chapel of Ease, at Garrison, in the parish of Devenish; addressed to John Killigrew Dunbar, esq.
2. Copy of a letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, esq. to the Bishop, dated Clanbrassel Place, 31 March 1823.
3. Copy of a letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, esq. to the Bishop, dated Clanbrassel Place, 9 April 1823.
4. Copy of a letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, esq. to the Bishop, dated Garrison House, 21 June 1823.
5. Copy of a letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, esq. to the Bishop, dated 29 January 1823.
6. Copy of a communication from the Rev Hume Lawler, incumbent of the parish of Devenish.
JKD stated that he wished th98e new church to be built at Kilcoe rather than at Garrison. Garrison was chosen but he also refused to either join his opponents in making a joint grant of the lands in Garrison, or to execute a separate grant, unless the Bishop undertakes not to accept a grant from his opponents. The curate of Garrison Rev Andrew Young, formerly resided in the house now occupied by Mr Dunbar, near Garrison, but being no longer permitted to reside there, and being unable to procure a residence in the village of Garrison, or within the parish, he now resides at Belleek, within two miles of the parish.
The memorial to JKD, from the Protestant inhabitants of Kilcoe on your estate ....understanding that a grant for building the church at Garrison (also on your estate), was made in the year 1817 ... to prevent (they prefer Kilcoe) May 18 1822.
Letter no, 2 mentions that he had built a school house on his estate.
Letter no. 4 mentions the original Dunbar or Garrison estate, so called from its being fortified against the rebels by my family, as in the patent preserved (and now in my possession) much of the lands are specified by name, as well in Lord Ely's General Archdall's and Colonel Hamilton's estates merged into their respective families by marriage connections. The weakness of my father, and his connection with his first wife's family (she being the mother to the Archbishop of Dublin, Agar) and residing far from this property, made him the dupe of designing persons here, who by their fraud and management, became rich while he became poor, and more than twenty years, most foreign and hard service in the Army, permitted every advantage to be taken of me, so that when I came to take possession of my property (one of the oldest grants in this county) I had to contend for almost every inch of it by the more severe service of legal procedure. As a resident gentleman and a magistrate, wishing in my retiring days to render to my country now all the little services I can, I trust ... to forward the purposes of religion, and support my own rights...
Letter no 5 mentions the falling in of the church of Garrison about 5 years since ... Having impeached the lease of that part of my estate where the church had alwasy been, until I succeeded in breaking it in 1821 ... offer any other part of my estate. He High Sheriff of Fermanagh, Ireland, in 1825. Nov 20 1824: Names of gentlemen returned by the Judges of Assize to serve the office of High Sheriff for the coming year: Fermanagh - John Killigrew Dunbar of Garrsion, Church-hill; with two others.
The Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier on 22 Dec 1825 reported: John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq., of Garrison House, Fermanagh, had addressed a lertte to the Lord Bisop of Clogher, complaining that the grant of £900, by the Board of First Fruits, 1817, for building a church in the county, has not been since carried into effect, to the very great inconveneience of a numerous body of Protestants near Garrison.
The Enniskillen chronicle and Erne Packet on the same date stated ... great distance from the parent church at Monea in the parish of Devenish ... I have already stated their want of a place of worship - for now, eight years. Theyhave no burial ground, and their dead are obliged to taken for interment ot another county, where no clergyman is bound to attend. They certianly have a curate, but he neither resides int eh parish nor in the county, and the inconvenient distances, with other impedigiments, render his services on emergency difficult to obtain. .... To some way obviate this I long since offered the use of the school house I had built in the centre of this chapelry, adn of my Estate - and immediately in the vicingage of the Protestatns (capable of contining the entire of the congregations) until such time as a place of worship should be built...Your Lordship's mst obedient huble servant, John Killegrew Dunbar, Garrison House, Dec 11, 1825.
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The Christian examiner and Church of Ireland magazine, vo. II Jan-June 1826 in the Domestic religious intelligence section reported: John Killigrew Dunbar, Esq. of Garrison House, Fermanagh, has addressed a letter to the Archbishop of Clogher, complaining that the grant of £900, by the Board of First Fruits, in 1817, for building a church in that county, has not been since carried into effect, to the very great inconvenience of a numerous body of Protestants, near Garrison.
1 Feb 1826. Chief Secretary's Office. Copy of memorial of Major John Killigrew Dunbar, Dublin, to [Prince Frederick], the Duke of York, Field Marshal and Commander in Chief, seeking military positions for his two sons, Charles and Frederick, both of whom have been educated in Trinity College Dublin. Noting that he served in the 83rd Regiment from 1786 to 1806 in the Peninsular Wars and in the West Indies and mentioning members of his family who also served in the army. Adding that he is involved in costly legal cases in an attempt to gain possession of lands in County Fermanagh, originally granted to an ancestor, Sir John Dunbar in 1616. Including a copy of a testimonial of Sir John Dunbar, from the Duke of Marlborough, to the then Secretary of State, dated 8 July 1716. Exent1 item; 2pp.
Journals of the House of Lords, Volume 58 in 1826 mentions Dunbar & Kane re setting aside a deed of 1780; p.68.
16 May 1826-16 Jul 1827. Creator: Chief Secretary's Office.
File of papers relating to copy of memorial of Maj John Killigrew Dunbar, Clonbrassil Place, Dublin, to [Richard] Wellesley, Lord Lieutenant, seeking employment for his son Patrick as expectant guager in the excise department, a position vacated by another son, Frederick, who is now serving in the 87th Regiment of Foot. Includes letters from: Maj Dunbar, 46 Cuff Street, Dublin, to Gen Archibald, Grove, Emo, [County Laois]; Archibald to William Gregory, Under Secretary; and Maj Dunbar to Gregory. Annotation on reverse indicates Patrick has been recommended for the position.
Date10 May 1826: Chief Secretary's Office. Memorial of John Killigrew Dunbar, Clanbrassil Place, [Dublin], to [Richard] Wellesley, Lord Lieutenant, seeking a civil position and noting that he served for nearly 20 years in the army and held the rank of major in the 83rd Regiment of Foot. Claiming that he was required to leave the military in order to devote himself to the near ‘destruction of his proper inheritance’ and noting that he has nine children to support. Includes annotation stating that it is not possible to grant his request. Exent1 item; 2pp.
4-6 August 1827. Chief Secretary's Office. Letter from John Killigrew Dunbar, 46 Cuff Street, Dublin, to Richard Wellesley, Lord Lieutenant, seeking employment in some suitable situation, in light of his previous service as Major in the army..
30 Aug 1827 letter from 46 Cuffe St Dublin to Gen Mervyn Archdall, MP: - To have given you any trouble in answering my last, was not by any means my intention. It went merely to state the dread I had but too much reason to apprehend of unfavourable impressions being endeavoured at prejudicial to me, and as some matter you might have considered at least extraordinary, had it reached you (however convinced you would not attend to it). I thought (as I do now) that you should at any rate know something of it from myself. How far the ingenuity of propagation to injure both me and my cause may have gone, I can have but by report, but as part of that report has been such as to extremely distress me, I feel warranted (as some way connected in it) to give it to you, without any desire, I assure you, to trouble you, but as some excuse for the liberty I have already taken; and as this cannot do any harm, and may from probably some information in it not be unacceptable, permit me to put you in possession of a little narrative connected with both our families.
     An absurd, false and mischievous report has reached me, that as a common disturber of property in Fermanagh I had an idea of extending my views, even to some parts of yours and Colonel Montgomerys; a matter that, even could there have been a shadow of original legal grounds for, must confound me with the most ignorant in your counry in respect to time, and which I conclude has originated in researches I have had to make on my title (and this is actually so true, that I have been visited, for the purpose of leading me astray, by the most ridiculous kind of information, and I conclude for the intent of giving colour to the fabrication I allude to). Some connection subsisting between us will I trust plead in excuse for sending you the result of my enquiries, which if you can in any way correct will oblige me considerably.
Landed property in those days was not held in the same hereditary view as now, and estates appear to have been partitioned as portions to sons or daughters, either in the lifetime of the donor or by will established, previous to the .. of lineal heirship to secure the property in the elder branch of the family and thus accounts for the disposition of the grant of James ye first, we are concerned in, the patent of which, under the King's signature, is now in my possession, and my title deed, and has been always with those I am immediately descended from, but which can give me no kind of claim or title to more than that partition handed down to me in heirship, and therefore every invidious story circulated has nothing but the grossest folly and wickedness to support it, with the manifest intention of creating feelings likely to disturb every sentiment of interest and regard. Therefore on this head, should any matter of this nature have reached either you or Col. Montgomery, as it has myself, all I have to say on the occasion is, that the circumstance, as far as I am concerned, has not the least similitude to fact; no more then than I believe an allegation I have now to meet in my cause, that Robert Weir (a character well known in Fermanagh and elsewhere), and consequently the Hamiltons, late of Garrison, are relatives of mine, - an honor I really do not aspire to, and for what reason brought in legal charge now I cannot conceive. Consequently any information on this head will be most desirable, as it has put me to the proof of my family, whose genealogy you have with this, as far as from documentary evidence I have been able to acquire it, at great labour and expense, made necessary from the many frauds committed on my father and myself, and my military absence having been taken such advantage of, as to oblige me to a continual legal contest for more than twenty years, and to relinquish a profession I was particularly attached to and had on service acquired some character in, and where, had I been able to remain, I would have been now in the list of Lieutenant Generals, instead of the list of supplicants for any employment for myself or a large family of ten children, with too many of the children of the Law to maintain.
     To come to the historic part, James ye first granted to three officers, high in consideration (namely, the ancestor of the Florencecourt family, the Hume family, and to Sir John Dunbar, knight banneret), that part of Fermanagh from Lough Melvin to and into Inniskillen, divided nearly equal, the Leitrim side to the first, the Erne side to the second, and the centre slip (we are concerned in) to the latter; which they had to fight for, first against the Maguire, Prince of Fermanagh, and the mere Irish, as in Patent so stated, and next with the Church, who came in for a large share, but without bloodshed. Major John Dunbar defended the pass against the Leitrim rebels & built the first barracks in Fermanagh on the borders of Lough Melvin, hence that post, formerly Killawhoe, took the name of Garrison. His son, also Major John Dunbar, raised men in Fermanagh, (which the Patent permits for the King's service), and march'd to Carlow, where he had some connections, and defended the Castle there against the army of James 2nd and the rebels, and got a grant from William 3rd of an estate there, Ballycarney, which my father sold to a Mr Vicars in 1767. The rest is detailed in the annexed pedigree, made particularly ...... of Majors but ... amongst the first protestant settlers in that county, where I must consequently from its respectability be anxious to hold a stake in, and truly have fought for, but the harrassing I have had to encounter, and want of ammunition, may (good as my cause) leave my possessions a prey to the enemy; but while there remains a drop of the blood of my ancestors in me, I will fight it out. Excuse this too long intrusion, and don't take any trouble in replying to it, unless you may be able to give me any serviceable information, in correcting any part in which I may be astray, which I am convinced your good and kind feeling for me will induce you to do if necessary or in your power.
     As to the former Hamiltons of Garrison, I never heard of any particular respectability attached to them and I believe the father of old Patrick Hamilton was an honest and industrious pedlar, who first got on my estate from continually attending the fair at Garrison, and really never heard that anyone belonging to him was connected in the Dunbar family. The only consolation I have in this very long trespass is, that if it does no good, it can do no harm in the little history it presents of a part of that County you are, I believe, one of the Governors of, and its representative, which that in both you may long remain, in the sincere wish of, My dear Sir, Your faithful & obedient servant John K Dunbar
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3 Jul 1830-5 Jul 1830. Creator: Chief Secretary's Office.
Letter from Maj John Milligan [Killigrew] Dunbar, [magistrate], Dublin [originally County Fermanagh], to [Archdeacon] Thomas Singleton, [private secretary to Hugh Percy, 3rd duke Northumberland, Dublin], enclosing an intended affidavit by Arthur Snow, Harold’s Cross, County Dublin, bailiff of Dunbar, reporting that he and James [Mehan], also bailiff, were not able to serve Dunbar’s tenantry at Slattinagh, [County Fermanagh] with warrants, singling out William O’Neill and ] Fowler, mentioning John McDermick, magistrate.
Exent2 items; 5pp.
He may have been the John Dunbar, Protestant denomination, of Kingstown, Dubllin who petitioned for the repeal of the legislative union between Gr Britain and Ireland.
He sold all his property in Fermanagh to General Mervyn Archdall according toIrish equity reports, v 3. Ireland. High Court of Chancery, Ireland. Rolls Court: Chapman vs Dunbar.
     Major John Killigrew Dunbar was mentioned in a civil court action in June 1840. Sarah Chapman petitioner & John Killigrew Dunbar, respondent. The petition in this matter stated, that on the 15 July 1828, the respondent John Killigrew Dunbar, then of Garrison, Fermanagh, passed his bond & warrant of attorney for confessing judgment thereon signed John K Dunbar to the petitioner, in the penal sum of £299.4.0 to secure her payment of £114.12.0 with legal interest... until the year 1832 continued to be seized in fee simple of certain lands therein particlarly mentioned and situate in county Fermanagh; and that in the year 1832, he sold all his estate in the said lands to General Mervyn Archdall to take the rents issues and profits thereof during his life, and that the said Colonel Wm Archdall, as such devisee was now in possession of the said lands ... It further appeared that in 1765, Geroge Dunbar, the respondent's father, uonder whom he derived as heir=at-law, in consideration of £1000 mortgaged the lands in fee .....
     Major John Killigrew Dunbar in Abbeville, France, sent a letter dated 20 February 1842 to Capt Frederick Dunbar. From Abbeville in France, John Dunbar wrote to his son Captain Frederick Dunbar, late 39th Foot, 2 Camden Terrace, Camden town, London: My dear Frederick, I would not have been so long without acknowledging your kind and affectionate letter of 23 December last and thanking you for, to me, a most valuable present of Lundy Foot?, but first I had thought that your letter had been written on the day of your departure, and that any communication from me would not have got to you at this side of the line and I was only acquainted of your being 'delayed' when from a nervous attack combined with gout I was till this moment unable to hold a pen! I seize this first opportunity of, as far as in my power (for I am by no means certain this will now reach you) to assure you and which I trust there in your mind) and can be no reason for doubting that to my heart you are the same beloved son you ever were and that its best wishes are for your health, happiness and prosperity in whatever undertaking you embrace! As to the gloomy part of separation, we must be Men and bear with resignation the good and evils of the World - of the latter I have had my share in disappointments and manifold vexations! but providence has been kind to me and strengthens my mind to be contented under its wisdom! and to attain a great age, & have reason to be thankful when I have to state that my constitution has not given away under an afflicting series of accidents and misfortunes, & that I am at this moment, with the exception of a shortened leg by rheumaticks, as in general health as I have been for many years, but from a weakness of nerve, subject to very distressing attacks of agitation. When surprised by any matter calling to my mind the 'Lang Teine'; but they last not long! and being in the want of kindness & care about me. I battle the twitch? very well and determined to happy and quiet if I can. I most commonly ... better than I could have supposed. My appetite good and my sleep refreshing; not a sous in debt in France. Not an attorney to distract my repose! I give you this 'notes? of .... to you interesting detail/actuel!. For my dear Frederick, as long as memory holds her .... I cannot forget the kindness of your attendance & nursing of your poor old father. & may God of his infinite mercy and goodness reward you ..., as well in this as in another better world is the ... prayer of your affectionate father, though I almost despair of this getting to you in England. I conclude there may be some chance of its following you, I need not say that wherever you may be I shall ever be happy to hear from you. If you again go to Sydney, pray make my affectionate regards to my old respected friend Major Ross. I ever found him a sincere friend & excellent soldier and my best wishes & regards attend him. If you have not yet departed home, I have not to say I expect to hear from you. I trust your children & your friends about you are well. My love and regards attend them. Now my dear Frederick, I must say adieu. Not being able to say more just now. Without perhaps producing excitement better kept at a distance. God in Heaven bless you and yours.
Should you correspond with ... tell him on receipt of his kind note I am and could not meet him as expected through here. I but conclude he must/have? got it.
I am still anxious not to have my evidence known to anyone, but yourself and George.
Your ever affectionate father
John K Dunbar
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He was described as of Garrison House, Belleek when his son went to TCD.
     He held land at Chelmsford, Essex which was sold and a rough draft signed by George K Dunbar, John K Dunbar and Lord Dover was in the possession of Edward Stott in 1910.
     A letter from Ted Stott to J D Dunbar in 1911 mentions that Major JKD was at loggerheads with his second wife" and that he died at Abbeville, France, sometime in the early 50's I think. The Essex property was sold in 1790 or thereabouts and regarding the other property, he was involved in a heavy lawsuit - and to all appearances came off second best.
     John died on 19 February 1854 in Abbeville, Somme, France, aged 84. Died, On the 19th February, at the house of Monsieur Antoinne, Rue Rivage, Abbeville, where he had resided for years, in the 85th year of his age, Major John Killigrew Dunbar, late of Her Majesty's 83rd Regiment of Foot, and formerly of Garrison, county Fermanagh and Clanbrassil Place, Dublin.
There is no will recorded at PCC between 1852 and 1857.

Children of Major John Killigrew Dunbar and Helena Nash

Children of Major John Killigrew Dunbar and Jane Mary Vivian

John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar

(13 October 1852 - 1 February 1921)
     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was commonly known as Jack. He was born on 13 October 1852 in Melbourne, Victoria. It was claimed that he was born at Wethersdane on Pound Rd in 1851. He was the son of George Killigrew Dunbar and Anne Potter Watt. John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was christened on 25 May 1853 in the Independent Church, Melbourne, Victoria. John Thos Killigrew Dunabr, son of George & Ann, born 13 Oct 1852, baptised 25 May 1853, born Melbourne.
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was listed in a directory dated 1870 as a wheelwright at Walker Street, Dandenong, Victoria. John was a coachbuilder from 1873, in Dandenong, Victoria. As a youth he was apprenticed to John Hemmings as a coachbuilder and general blacksmith and later leased that well-known business. In 1873 John K Dunbar bought the wheelwright & blacksmith business from John Hemmings and for some time kept the old premises in Pultney St, but later removed to a small shop next door to A Griffiths on the corner of Main & Foster Sts. Later he and Mr Hemmings again joined forces and adopted the style of Dunbar & Hemmings.
He was a member of the local football team in 1874 & 77 and also hunted and sang.
Private advertisements: Dissolution of partnership: Notice is hereby given that the partnership between the undersigned John Hemmings & John Killigrew Dunbar in the trade or business of coachbuilders, of Dandenong under the style or firm of "Hemmings & Dunbar" was this day dissolved by mutual consent; and in future the business will be carried on by John Hemmings ... 27 Nov 1874.
He advertised from 1875 in the Dandenong paper. He was sole agent for Dandenong-Australasian Bone Mille Co. (6 Feb 1878).
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar served in the military in the Army in February 1878. He was appointed Sergeant in the Southern Troop of Light Horse. He was a publican in Dandenong from August 1878 to 1882. He was described as being the new proprietor of the Bridge Hotel, "almost a native of the township, being about 1 year old when first arrived".
On 15 February 1882 it was announced that Mr J K Dunbar was retiring from business (Bridge Hotel) in favour of Mrs Rosling - the hotel to be managed by Mrs Geo Dunbar.
Notice of application for a Publican's licence: ... I , John Killigrew Dunbar of Dandenong, do hereby give notice that I desire to obtain and will at the next licensinn Meeting, apply for a publican's licence, for a a house situate at Lonsdale Street, Dandenong, contanbibg twenty rooms, exclusive of those required for the use of the family. 11 Nov 1878. John K Dunbar.
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar married Margaret Ann Green, daughter of Michael Green and Jenny Scales, on 25 January 1880 in the Roman Catholic church presbytery, Elsternwick, Victoria.
He broke his arm in a fall from a horse 26 May 1880 - "a heavy man".
In 1881 he was summoned by his servant for wages. He advertised the Bridge Hotel on 6 Apr 1881. John was the mail contractor from 1881 to 1883, in Dandenong.
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was declared bankrupt on 2 October 1886 in Tooradin. Compulsory sequestration of the estate of John Killigrew Dunbar of Tooradin. Declared insolvent J Thomas Killigrew Dunbar of Tooradin, Publican 255 pounds, 11 shillings 3 pence deficiency.
The Vic Police gazette reported: Stolen from the bedroom of John Dunbar, Torkieth Station, Lang Lang, Western Port, about the 7th instant, a gent's heavy gold ring, set with a large cat's-eye stone. Value £40. Complainants present address is 3 Naylor St, South Yarra.
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was listed in a directory dated 1890 at Box Hill Road, Oakleigh, Victoria. He was admitted to the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, on 12 February 1896. John Dunbar, formerly of Dandenong, now in the Alfred hospital with rheumatism.
     John was registered as John Dunbar, wheelwright at Dunkeld, Victoria, on the 1903 electoral roll.
     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Thomas Rosling dated 7 March 1907. "Yarramau", Flemington, 7/3/07
Dear Jack,
I am very sorry to hear of your ill health. You have certainly been a martyr to Rheumatism. What I want, send me all the correspondence you had (years ago) from those Dublin lawyers, and prepare me a "Power of Attorney", and get it sworn before a Justice of the Peace, in Penshurst, and any letters you may have referring to the property, and enclosed in the Power of Attorney giving agreement to allow me 5 per Cent & Execs on all (or any) monies, you may secure out of the "Great Expectations" from this Chancery Court, where George K. Dunbar as advertised for. Fannie has the family pedigree, she is well and the children like-wise, but I can't earn enough to keep the pot boiling, so Wally wrote me to come over.
"Thomas Rosling, Publican" is "wanted in Claimants for property in Chancery".
Wally sent 20/- over to London, and ask for information supplying my Pedigree too. Give my love to Maggie, & family by Inile [This word is difficult to decipher] write at once, I hear of what Tommy Lloyd said "Who says you enquired of him about this biz. years ago"
Yours faithfully,
T. Rosling
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Thomas Rosling dated 18 April 1907. "Yarramau", Ascot Vale Rd, Flemington, 18/4/07
Dear Jack,
I have been working at your business constantly, and mention to Tommy Lloyd often. He asks me for your address, a forthright buck! and I saw him yesterday. He said he had written to England about your business, and expected a reply. He seems to have very sanguine hopes of your success. It could not come at a better time. I am homeless, and can't get anything, though I wont go back to Fanny until I can give (or send) her money. She says it is no good as she can struggle on better without me, than with me -- I am confident of getting into business. Harry Pockling (very hard to decipher .. author was a shocking writer .. jor) tho' has about £18,000 he expects from Chancery. He has promised me 5 per cent for any I get -- given me a letter, with power to deal.
Remember me to your family,
Yours faithfully,
T. Rosling
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Thomas Rosling dated 25 May 1907. "Yarramau", Ascot Vale Rd, Flemington,
25/5/07
Dear Jack,
I was very pleased to get your letter, I went to Tommy Lloyd same day, shewed him your letter. He says he has written Home about your business -- expects an answer back in about two months, he speaks very favourably of your
Poor old Fannie: she says I may as well come and spend the little time I have left with her. I have got such a splendid boy in Bertie, he wrote me such a touching letter, he says that he fears that I left home with the thought that he didn't think much of me, but he wished me to disabuse my mind -- (If I harbor) such feelings, as he considered me a hero to battle with such opposing circumstances as he had witnessed. Wait, said he, my star is in its ascendancy, I will see you are taken care of.
He is a most brilliant "Black & White" artist, he often gets cheques from Sydney for his sketches -- he will make his mark in the world. You know my dear Anice married a Flash Fellow named Hollinhed. Well, they have been staying for some weeks with Tottie at Curtains Hotel Elgin St. Carlton. Anice and her two little girls gone to Sydney to an aunt of Fred's whom she never ever met and left Mr. Flash Holinshed behind. Sponging on Tot. sort of barman and bookkeeper (just about fit him, plenty of cheap drinks and no work) I think Tot. is a fool --- people will talk.
I am glad today, Jack, I have left drink and its company behind for ever -- God helping me, its as much as I can expect, to find bread and a bit of tobacco. I am not sure I shall escape public charity before I die -- I have found one Friend who has promised never to forsake me -- "We are but horses along life's scene driven Time is, to us, a big probation given --- To fix us for a dread eternity"-----
I am sorry to hear you are such a martyr to the rhumatia I am suffering from diabetes, and at times it acts like blood poisoning. My head aches, heart flutters and a weary depression -- make you long for death -- Fanny says she doesn't consider me capable of work, suppose I could get it to do. What can I expect? I am 70 in July -- If we are lucky enough to get this money, there will be more than enough for us all. Jack Linton would not receive any if you were to offer it to him -- Anice visited them -- Jessie insisted upon silence -- never mention the name of Dunbar in Jack's presence. He never ask her if I was alive - charging his son when leaving for New Zealand - "Remember, you, are a Linton! If you disgrace the name, never darken my door again."
I say, "Proud line of earth, I scorn thy words and thee" I should like to have enough to own my house, a pony and phaeton drive my dear old girl, & my daughters Effie (??) & Emily -- about without work and anxiety. The short evening of my life.
Love to all,
Yours affectionately,
T.. Rosling
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     John resided at Penshurst, Victoria, from 1907 to 1911. See letters dated 1907 from Thos Rosling in Flemington to Jack (in Penshurst) re chasing their "inheritance". In 1910 he was corresponding with his uncle E H V Dunbar while living at Penshurst, regarding their ancestry, etc. In a letter dated 2 August 1911 he mentions the bank failure which took all his money, he mentions his good famly who through his marriage reverted to the old faith so have no children as far as the church is concerned. He mentions his grandmother who was a Halahan of Dublin, one was a surgeon in Dubln and one was a CE Reverend in St Patrick's cathedral and I was educated for the church but would not take kindly to it, too fond of sport I suppose.
     John was registered as John Killigrew Dunbar,wheelwright of Penshurst with Kate, home duties and Jean, book keeper at Penshurst, Victoria, on the 1909 electoral roll.
     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Thomas Rosling dated circa 1910 or 1911. 73 Jersey St, "Jolimont" via Subiaco. WA
Dear Jack,
Yesterday, in Perth, I saw -- "Tommy Lloyd", coming with his wife, back from a trip to London. I asked him about the Dunbar in Chancery. "Oh!" he said, "I enquired when at the Chancery Court. They told me an aunt of the claiments (Mother thinks a Mrs. Carpenter drew all the available funds, out of the Court, the Claiment not forwarding his signature (Mrs. Carpenter; had followed up the case for years, believing her son was the next in line. "Lloyd says he will write me an official explanation.
Mother and Bettie have both a lovely little home here, with a good garden and it is so "trooly zoozal" - - no traffic disturbing the serenity -- good roads, streets. Lit with electricity, 10 minutes to Subiaco rail, 3d (penny) return to Perth, scrub and tree planted bays -- purchase price ú175. Soon in fact off, with the deposit paid and 12/6 per week. They are all well. I have been expecting to "depart" for 2 years, but this zoozal life seems to have resucitated me.
See Bert's work in the "Bulletin", "Truth", "Golden West", "The Mirror", and other papers. Bob is at Hamelin (??) Pool. George at Perth, Anice in Sydney. She has been confined to her bed (by sickness) for part. For 4 weeks. I hope she is better. I have been superannuated for 3 years -- no work. No pay'
Kind Regards from us all,
Thos. Rosling
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 11 September 1910. Nambour, Queensland, 11 Sept. 1910
Dear Cousin John,
I expected to hear from you, but possibly you thought it would do if the girls wrote: and it does perhaps do just as well. However, I wanted to let you know (or remind you as the case may be) of 2 or 3 matters which you as heir-at-law ought to bear in mind.
The most important to my mind, that the Arwenack case 28 (or so) years ago was a test-case and the decision of the Chancellor in that case would probably apply to the rest of the Killigrew property, and as that property may be worth anything up to a million, you ought to get into communication with all your relatives. Perhaps the Ceylon Dunbars may be well off and could afford to make enquiries.
I could get 12 months leave of absence (on half pay) at any time, but then I could not afford to go home as I have no money saved, in any case I am too old to care to spend any money on what could not benefit me for some years to come, and that would be "Too Late".
Another and important fact that the value of the Arwenack property was divided among all the then living descendants of Major J.K. Dunbar. Today there are only the descendants of 3 sons alive. The Reverend John's, Frederick's, and Henry's.
In '81 or '82 Clara (Charles' daughter) and Mary (George's) were alive but unmarried and too old to have children if later married. George and Charles had no other issue.
Should there be any information in my power to give you I shall be most happy to do so.
I think that you should write to Philpott (if he is alive): I do not say that you should spend any money further than that what buys postage stamps & paper, but you need not be sparing of your time.
Your cousin E.H.V. Dunbar
My only brother (died unmarried) was W.T. Killigrew Dunbar. Are you Killigrew? I have a seal given by Charles II to Lady Killigrew. In our house at home we had a beautiful Cabinet given by the same lively monarch to Killigrew himself. Also a spinning wheel given by Charles to Killigrew or some other ancestral connection.
Of course, the whole business may be a dream, but still there is the Arwenack case and Philpot evidently took all risks. Had the decision been the other way, he would have lost (seemingly) £300 certain to £600 possibly.
And for the past 80 years all relatives have been convinced of the reality of the Dunbar claims whatever their notion of the value of the property. You understand that I lived with my grandmother (the Major's widow) generally 'till 1864 when she died (she had her marriage settlement annuity from '52 to '64). I knew Captain Fred intimately '79 to '90 (I think). I met the Rev. John (your grandfather): even George I stayed with in Paris as a child. I was 15 when my father died. So you will infer that I must have heard a good deal (true or exaggerated) about the family. Charles' daughter (Clara) lived as my father's ward in our home from '57 'til1 that home broke up in '65.
Lastly, the infernal law suit led directly or indirectly to the ruin of all of us in Ireland
E.H.V.D

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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 25 September 1910. Nambour, Queensland, 25-9-10
My dear Cousin,
Let me in the first place let you know who I am. I sent a copy of pedigree of later generations to your daughter Alice. If you refer to that you will see that I am the eldest son of Henry Hussey Vivian Dunbar the youngest son by second wife of your great-grandfather. He was chief clerk of the Irish Education Department. My mother (nee Anna Caddell) was an heiress on a small scale. Both my parents died young one in 1863 the other in '65. The Revd. John was at my father's deathbed, a hale old man while my poor father was 42 and a broken hearted wreck. (the curse of the big lawsuit indirectly responsible for the wreck.)
I will be happy to give you any information I can, "free, gratis, and for nothing" and I assume that you would be fairly generous to your kinsmen if you came in for a million more or less. But as I am over 60 years of age I would not take any active part for I have nothing saved. Of course I could get leave of absence at any time but it would be without pay. (at least after 6 months)
I should tell you I am, (so far as I know), the only member of the Dunbar family in Australia that was born in Ireland. I knew your grandfather (and have one or two of his letters even now). I knew (Captain) Frederick very well. From him I got 2 seals, one given by Charles II to Lady Killigrew, the other said to have been worn by John Dunbar (aide de camp to Marlboro' ). Clara, daughter of Charles (killed at Arrah) and I were brought up together from 1857 to '65. So you will see that I know more of the family than anyone living. All the same I do not know as much as I would like to know.
I have written to a nephew of mine (a son of my sister) whose address is: 115 Falconer St., Clifton Hill. Melbourne
He will probably take a niece down to see you. I just got his address from his mother in England. He is a fine young fellow, but has not been more successful than the rest of his Kin for the last 80 years. I know nothing about him since he was a boy.
You might let me have the address of the Ceylon people. The Major's first wife was a Cork woman, and probably the Ceylon cousin does not know that the Dunbars did not live there. For years we owned Ballycarney in Carlow but were never regarded as a South of Ireland family.
I will try and get to Melbourne at Xmas but in the mean time shall be glad to correspond with you. I am in correspondence with Cousin Dora whose mother I knew personally 50 years ago in Dublin.
Your brother George, I corresponded with for some time in a casual way. I had a letter from him shortly before his death in the Gulf Country.
Your aunt, Elizabeth Dobson was married from my father's house I believe about 1849.
With Kindest regards to all your family, Yours sincerely, EHV Dunbar
PS If we meet, I shall tell you how I came down in the world, or rather how never got up. I was only a boy when my father died. The family would seem to have had a curse on it for over 100 years. Let us hope that the curse will lift before long.
Until I was 15 years of age I was a gentleman by education association and parentage: so you may infer that in my communication with my relatives I am not actuated by any business motives whatever. Of course I would be delighted to go home with you as a witness provided my expenses were paid, but then I could not pay my own expenses without beggaring myself.

(NOTE:- The following is written on the back of the first page of this letter. From the size of writing and its position, it was an addition after the letter had been folded.)
Did you know your uncle Tom died only a few months age in Queensland. I did not know that he was alive & in Qld. Neither did uncle Fred nor his family. The curse again
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 24 October 1910. Nambour, Queensland, 24-10-10
Dear Cousin,
In the first place I wish you to understand that I am not at all offended at anything you wrote in your 1st letter to me. But it seemed possible that you might be under the impression that I would be actuated by business motives - to some extent at least in connection with the Killigrew-Dunbar property (if such have an existance), and I wished to remove that impression. Whatever information I can give you you are welcome to, without stipulations. Of course I am a poor man with the prospect of dying in receipt of the old age pension. Should you become a millionaire I would (expect ..deleted) hope that, for the credit of the name, you would act generously to your poor relations.
The great point that I wish you to keep in mind is -- that Philpott 30 years ago gained the Arwenack case and that the money was divided among the then living representatives of Major J.K. Dunbar. My two sisters got each as her share seven pounds: (Owing to a clause in my father's will they got my share between them). Your aunt Fanny (Mrs. Nichols) got a larger share than any other member owing to the Rev. J. K. Dunbar' s ( her father ) wil1. Captain Fred. K. Dunbar (the Major's only living son at the time) got £14-0-0. The shares were awarded by the court. The lawyers (on each side) got £600 between them. I have a copy of the taxed bill of costs. All this is matter of facts not of supposition.
By the way, John Stott (my nephew) remembers going with his mother to Philpott's office, tho' he had forgotten the reasons for her visit.
I might also tell you that Edw. Stott (Jack's eldest brother) has in his possession a rough draft of a sale of land at Chelmsford (A MARGINAL NOTE:- "in Essex") over 100 years ago, signed by George K. Dunbar, John K. Dunbar, and Lord Dover.
So far as my memory servs me Major J.K. D. served a writ of ejectment on Lord Loftus in connection with a property in Devonshire, in about 1806. Again I have a dim idea that Lt.Normanton, Lt.Clifden (or both) advanced a considerable sum of money to my grandfather to carry on the case or rather cases, for there were many properties involved.
The Arwenack case is the great point to be borne in mind. Should you have the opportunity, get some opinion on it. Submit it to Preston or some agency firm.
With Kind regards
Yours sincerely
E.H.V Dunbar
P.S. Do not be tempted to spend any money, as Arwenack even may have been connected with fraud tho there is no reason to think so. Write soon.
I am doubtful about the Ceylon man being one of the family. Let me know when you next hear from him. What is the town he lives near? You did not write it distinctly. Is it Kotogala?
E.H.V.D
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 20 December 1910. c/- Mr. John Stott, 19 Sercombe Rd, Glenferrie. 20.12.10
Dear Cousin John,
I enclose copy of pedigree: It may convey some information: You need not return it. I regret that I cannot manage to visit Penshurst. Next year I shall have more time at my disposal & hope we shall meet.
J. Stott is my sister's son: I am visiting him today. With Kind regards and best wishes for a happy Xmas,
Yours sincerely,
E .H.V. Dunbar
Address your next to Nambour. I hope to be home in 10 days
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 23 December 1910. Excuse pencil: pens not suitable.
Dandenong, 23-12-10
Dear John,
I am with cousin Dora for a few days. I have gone thro' many of her old letters: my doubts have been increased by 2 or 3 of these. In one from Philpott he states that Martin Killigrew willed so much to George Dunbar of that ilk: I was under the impression that Mr.K had died intestate: this makes a very big difference in my opinion. Again Halahan never believed that anything else would come to the family in connection with the Killigrew property, and H. was evidently a clever man.
I saw Lloyd (the younger) for a few minutes, his father is away on a holiday: I gave him my address. L., like myself, wonders why Philpott did not go on with the case. It would evidently have paid him, (indecipherable word) by his costs in the Arwenack suit. This to my mind is a serious consideration.
In all the correspondence that Dora has, there is nothing tangible: all statements referring to the K. property are inferential or traditionary. I do not see one fact in all this correspondence that would have weight, except as collateral evidence. There are also a number of contradictory statements. Why you heard nothing from Philpott re Arwenack seems to be owing to his thinking the Rev. John's elder children were illegitimate.
With kind regards and best wishes for a happy Xmas & New Year.
Yours sincerely
E.H.V. Dunbar
P.S. Curious to say, I and brother and sisters were wards in chancery in 1865 or '66, but have heard nothing from the court since I got notice of the fact in the year mentioned. But why we were so I do not know. My mother was an heiress on a small scale. I believe that I am heir to 5 small properties, (mortgaged) but they are not worth much. However they may in the future bring in £40-0-0 per.annum
to my daughter. All of my mother's family (myself included) received $100 each some 20 years ago, most unexpectedly, out of an intestate estate in America. There was no trouble in connection with this. One fine morning I got a letter from the clerk of intestate estates in N.Y. telling me there was $100 to my credit in Bundaberg on proof of identity. I went to the bank and signed for the amount there and then & got it. Never had any other official communication. A pity the Dunbar -- kW. dividends do not come in a similar manner.
NOTE: - The next half page or 12 lines are missing. The letter continues on the last page ....
/ ....... I see that your family are R.C. Strange that 4 (at least) of the Dunbars living should have married into that faith. My mother too reverted before her death: her brother married a niece (I think) of Cardinal Cullen, and his family are of that faith.
I have also a niece, by marriage, who is now Superioress of a Convent in Virginia (US).
What must our Garrison Ancestors think of their descendants if they occasionally look down ? They must flap wings very angrily I should think.
E.H.V.D
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 9 January 1911. Nambour, Queensland, 9-1-11
Dear Cousin John,
I was in Dandenong for a few days and while there read, or rather got the gist of some 200 letters in cousin Dora's possession. Nothing tangible in these by themselves. By the way, I met your brother-in-law and enjoyed a very pleasant hour or so with him. He said he was going to see you shortly. Dora has since sent me notice of his mother's death.
The following pieces of information I have received since I wrote to you from Dandenong:--
1. De Bernardy's agent (Sydney) is in communication (personally) with your nephew George Kw.
2. It seems that the heirs of Major K. Dunbar have been advertised for.
3. George Dunbar owned 2 properties (one in London & one in Chelmsford, Essex) which were qambled away probably in 1791.
4. Martin KiIIigrew of Arwenack willed certain properties (including the 2 mentioned in 3) to George Dunbar and his heirs. The will is dated 1743. The legatee succeeded to these in 1744.
Now it was Arwenack property that was divided amongst several of us in 1887, presumably under this will of 1743, as it was from a property of said Martin Killigrew of Arwenack.
So far as I see, you as heir-at-law, would inherit any Irish estate that may exist. As to the Killigrew properties there is seemingly something different, as the Arwenack property was, as I have already said, divided among all then known decendants. I and my sisters getting shares. Captain Fred. K. the only surving son (of the Major's) got £14-0-0. I and my sisters got £14-0-0 (my father's share ) between us. Apparently the Chancellor decreed or assented to this division. My father was the only child of the 2nd marriage declared eligible to receive a share.
The story is not a savory one, taking it in its legal aspect. It would seem however that my grandfather married his 2nd wife 1stly with French Jersey or Scotch law, and 2ndly, some years before my father was born he again married her with Church of England rites. At any rate, she had her jointure out of the Garrison Estate which would imply that the Major considered her his wife from the first, or long before the C.of E. ceremony. I lived with her 'till 1864; and as I think I have already told you, Captain Charles Dunbar's orphan daughter was placed in her charge in 1857, which the War Office would hardly have allowed had there been any doubts as to the marriage. And certainly your grandfather and the HalIahans did not oppose the arrangement. Again, my younger brother and sister lived at Ballybay Rectory for a long time after my father's death in '65.
Your uncle Tom shortly before his death sent a message to George in Sydney to the effect that he never wanted to see or hear of a Dunbar again.
So far as my memory serves me the 1st step taken by the Major on leaving the army in 1804 was to serve a writ of ejectment on Lord Loftus to quit a property in Devonshire. So I take it that the Killigrew -- Dunbar property was spread over Cornwall, London, Essex, and Devonshire. Possibly in Staffordshire and Lincoln. Of course, this is only memory, I have no writing to show.
I give you all the information I am possessed of. Until 1883 or so I had only a historian's interest in the family history. Now I regard it as not impossible that you, or perhaps all of us, may benefit by our descent.
With Kindest regards to you all and best wishes for a prosperous year,
I am,
Very sincerely yours,
E.H.V. Dunbar
Thank Jean for her Xmas card
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 12 February 1911. Nambour, Queensland. 12- 2- 11
Dear Cousin,
I enclose herewith part of a letter received from my nephew, Edward Stott: he was brought up to the law, but left it for a commercial occupation. The information may be of some use to you; useful or not, it will be of interest to you as one of the family.
As I have written to you twice -- this is my 3rd letter -- since I heard from you, I shall not write again unless it be, as in this present case, to give you some fresh information which you are not likely to get from any other source. Of course, when you do write, I shall be only too pleased to reply.
Remember that 3 intelligent members of the family are under no delusions re the property -- (your humble servant, George K. (Sydny) & Edward Stott) You are heir-at-law, and must be, for that reason, the principle party concerned in all or any legal issues.
With best wishes, and Kind regards to your family,
I remain, Sincerely yours
E.H.V. Dunbar
P.S. Keep the enclosed.
Did I tell you that Bernardy's agent has interviewed Cousin George in Sydney?
. John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was mentioned in a letter from Edward Henry Hussey Stott dated 15 February 1911. 5 Belvedere Rd, Bexley Heath,
15th Feb 1911
Dear Uncle,
Thanks very much for your letter of the 7th ulto. to Fairview and our p'card to Brentwood -- both to hand by last mail.
I was (in common with all of us at home) interested and pleased to learn that you had managed to meet Jack, and are favourably impressed with him, his wife, and children. By a letter received this week, Jack informs Mother how delighted he was to meet you; it must indeed have been to him as a fresh bond with Home.
am obliged by the information given in the rough table of the Major's descendants. His matrimonial affairs certainly appear somewhat con. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Apparently, then, the . . . . . . . . . . . .??issue of his second marriage .... ipeten.. to share in any distribution of Estate, would be your father, the latter's interest of course, vested in his descendants. You say the marriage between the Major and your grandmother was not originally celebrated according to C.of E. rites. It occurs to me that if the marriage was celebrated in Jersey it might have been necessary (to conform with the existing laws of succession in vogue here) for the marriage to have been confirmed in the United Kingdom. I cannot suppose that a recognised .......... did not later place somewhere ........... the birth of Patrick D. ..., ............ your statement that Phillpott declared that your & his , ........... issue were the only descendants of the second marriage who could participate in the distribution of 1886 (?). Clears up a point that puzzles me. I wondered why the issue of Patrick & Mrs Delassert (Delassent ?) had not participated. Assuming they knew of the distribution, these descendants evidently accepted the position -- or did they attempt to asset themselves in any way? Then again it would follow that if there was any irregularity in the Major's second marriage, and Philpott's view is held to be correct, (and on this ........ would doubtless have ...... doubly sure before distribut ..... all the children (of the second marriage) ........... barred from participating in any future fund available. Have you any idea of what the property (the subject of our correspondance) consists?
If of land (real property in general) then we may conclusively say that the Penshust man will get it all; if of personal property of any description, then according to English Law, the descendants of John, George, Charles, Fred & HHV will divide equally. You say ........ "it may yet be div ......... the descendants of ......... & HHV". Why omit the ....... Charles D. & (Cara D.) of ...... Charles ? Surely ........... not debarred from participation in personal Estate! Perhaps you know of some legal disability attaching to sex which seems to be jolly rough on them! Put us right, please, on this point.
Now as to De Bernardy's enquiry. I know their firm wouldn't interest themselves without the prospect of some definite pecuniary advantage attaching! They are expert at matters of this sort ie. next-of-kin business. And from the fact of the agent searching descendants other than the heir-at-law George K of Sydney, I observe from your list, is a nephew of John K. of Penshust -- and ......... fore ...... not in the direct line of succession to Real .......... - (or John K. I believe you said has sons) it would appear that a general distribution is within the bounds of possibility. I shall doubtless hear further from you on this point when you have received George K's promised letter. Hope I have made myself clear and have not been unduly redundant.

NOTE : - The letter finishes here with no signature. Perhaps this is the "part of a letter" refered to in the letter Dunbar E-9, dated 23-3-11.
     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 26 February 1911. Nambour, Queensland, 26- 2-11
Dear Cousin,
You must bear in mind that I know nothing whatever of Killigrew property further than what I have already told you. Until 1887 (?) it was simply a legend to me that Anne Killigrew had left a great estate that came to George Dunbar in (about) the middle of the 18th Century and was lost to the family later on. As a boy in Ireland I understood that some part of the Irish Estates might revert to the heir-at-law, (then the Rev. John Dunbar) He for reasons best known to himself made no move in the matter: he does not seem even to have given any information to his sons. One point perhaps might be useful for you to know ie. that my grandmother had her marriage jointure paid 'till her death in 1864, I believe out of the Garrison Estate: she actually received £200 per annum.
I shal1 give you any information I may receive in the future: I will answer any questions so far as I am able to do so. But so far, you are as well aquainted with the whole story as I am. Your brother George seems to have had legal advice relating to the property, but his family know no particulars. In fact his son did not attach any significance to the name Killigrew 'till I wrote to him. By the way, do you know how he came to give his daughter "Vivian" as a baptismal name ?
I have written to Joseph Dunbar (a marginal note states "The Ceylon planter") but I feel sure that he is not a descendant of my grandfather: if a kinsman, it is thro' a much earlier forbear. He is going to England shortly and I gave him Edw. Stott's address and advised him to call and see him. Stott (who is my sister's eldest son) has had considerable legal training, tho' he left it for mercantile pursuits. He is, I consider, a clever fellow with a very logical turn of mind. By the way, you might get into correspondance with him: he is on the ground as it were. You might also address him as "cousin" for you are 2nd cousins.
I trust you will understand that I have no possible reason for keeping back anything from you. As heir-at-law you must be consulted by any lawer who may interest himself in the case. You will possibly get all of anything that may come of legal proceedings.
I may tell you that my work is harder than ever it has been, and I have less energy and ability to do it, and worse still I have absolutely no money saved. (My wife has a little of her own to live on). So you will infer that I have neither time nor money to spend on what may really be a myth or what might be of no benefit to me in any case.
Excuse haste: I am writing also to George (Sydney) and to Dora. If I had a shilling for every half-hour I have spent in letter writing-connected with the family history I would be a rich man, of course, the value of stamps and note-paper included.
With Kind regards to your wife & family,
Yours sincerely,
E.H.V. Dunbar
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 23 March 1911. Nambour, Queensland 23-3-11
Dear Cousin John,
I enclose letter received from my nephew, E.E.H. Stott. It may interest you to read it. You can burn it when read, or at least you need not return it. I should have said "part of a letter", the other part had no bearing on the Killigrew-Dunbar business.
You will note that I believe that both Mary and Clara are dead and certainly had no issue.
Yours in haste and with kind regards,
E. H. V. Dunbar
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 16 May 1911. Nambour, Queensland, 16-5-11
Dear Cousin,
Yours of the 11 inst. to hand. I wish to heaven that I knew what & where the Killigrew properties were or are: as I have already told you the only tangible part of the case is that the Arwenack ... was valued 25 or 6 years ago and the value legally awarded to members of the family - including among others, my father's children. That is the only distinctly and unequivacally tanqible information I possess. Were it not for that case, I would not give a second thought to the matter except as an interesting historical mystery. I see that Philpott the lawer who first moved in the case died a few weeks ago. Curious that his death should occur coincident with the revival of enquiries.
De Bernardy's agent left Sydney for Home last month. All the information George (your nephew) gave him was what he, George, had from me. That information, in substance I have given to you, Dora Wolff, and my nephews Edw. & John Stott.
Personally I am "Sub spe attainem sine expectatione" (under hope, but without expectations) Hope with a small h.
By the way, it may interest you to know that Lady Jane Kil1igrew of Arwenack, a worthy forebear, was condemned to be hanged for piracy, robbery, and murder, but got off her hanging. One of her victims cursed her and her descendants for ever and a day. The Chronicler of the incident believed that the curse would stick. Another curse was placed on the descendants of Earl Patrick (time 600 years ago): But this was only to hold good for a certain period, not particularized.
So you can see that we are handicapped on two sides, which is rather hard luck! The invocations occurred in connection with the Old Faith. Perhaps as so many of the family are reverting to that Faith, the curses may work themselves out; let us hope that the heretic members may benefit with the orthodox ones, when the luck turns. I think I told you that my mother "turned" before her death.
I hope Dorothy will succeed in passing her examination. Teaching is splendid for a girl.
Kind regards and best wishes,
Yours sincerely
E. H. V. Dunbar
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated Good Friday 1911. Nambour, Queensland, Good Friday 1911
Dear Cousin John,
Just a few lines to let you know I got yours of 7 April and to let you have my nephew's address as you intimate a desire to write to him, which I have let him know. His name is Edward Henry Hussey Stott. His address is
Mr. E. H. H. Stott
5 Belvedere Road
Bexley Heath
Kent
England
De Bernardy's agent here got all particulars that G.K.D. could give him, and is now on his way to England.
Did you ever write to Preston ? He seems to be the best known of all the agents. It could do no harm to communicate with him.
Excuse short letter, I am not feeling very well for the past week or so. "Dingo" possibly.
Kindest regards to all your people,
Yours sincerely
E.H.V. Dunbar

A clipping from a newspaper is attached to the origional. It is an advertisement for missing heirs and kindred. None of those mentioned refer to the Dunbar/Killigrew business, but the reply address is that of the PRESTON who is mentioned frequently in these letters
MISSING HEIRS AND KINDRED.--The estate of Mary Ellison, of Wigan, has fallen to his Majesty the King, in right of his Duchy of Lancaster -------------------etc
For further particulars write:- Sidney H. Preston, 27 Chancery Lane, London W.C.
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 2 July 1911. Nambour, Queensland July 2nd 1911
Dear Cousin,
I am glad that you have written to Edward Stott. He has the best head of this generation of Dunbars. He is now resuming the study and practice of the law, which he should never have given up. By the way address him as cousin, for his mother and your father were 1st cousins.
I did not see reference to the action of certain of the nobility searching records of oversea families etc.: I fear you overate my ability in connection with the family business. Remember I have been 37 years in Australia, that I was only 15 when my home was broken up, and that an Executor robbed me of everything bearing on the history of the family (that Executor was, it is supposed, hanged in Paris in '71. There is today awating him or his son £40,000.
I shall probably be in Victoria in October, when I hope we shall meet.
I am not very well, having the same bothersome cold sticking to me: I had symptoms of gout many years ago, but by sticking religiously to good whiskey (Jamieson's when I can get it) I got rid of the symptoms, now the tendancy seems to be asthmatic.
Kind regards to wife and daughters,
Yours sincerely E.H.V. Dunbar
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 26 July 1911. Nambour, Queensland, 26 July 1911
Dear Cousin John,
I had a letter from Ted Stott today. Since he wrote to you he had a letter from Preston stating that he, Preston, had communicated with you in a letter dated June 7th. Ted might be able to get on the right track if you sent him the gist of Preston's letter to you and if he could get ditto of Bernardy's inquiries (thro' his agent) in Sydney, from George.
My long leave began July 1st. I went to Bundaberg, intending to put in a month there, but got sick the first week and had to come home on the 17th inst. and here I am, an invalid; some heart trouble, but probably not organic. The Dr. in Bundaberg visited me 6 times: The Dr. here, a good man luckily, is attending me and says a few weeks rest will put me right: but my dancing days are done, and I have to eschew tobacco, whiskey, and other deleterious decoctions, as well as all doubtful company. Hard luck, just as I was going to enjoy the first holiday in 37 years. Well, I have had a fair innings tho' I should have done better at the game. Never mind, there is many a better man a darned sight worse off. With this rather inelegant expression and best wishes,
I am
Yours sincerely
E.H.V. Dunbar
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Thomas Rosling dated 29 July 1911. 29-07-1911.
7 Nash St, East Perth, WA
Dear Jack,
Your Aunt and myself were very delighted with your telegram of Congratulations, yesterday, we were puzzled to know how you knew our address? as we have but recently removed to this house. My sons, one in Melbourne (William) & George, in Perth, forgot. I was passing another milestone on my long ---- journey. Mother had but recently said that she desired to hear from you, we have not heard from your "people". My son (Bob) is at Hamelin Pool, Cablegram Officer, George in business at Perth, Anice and her two girls in Sydney, Jessie has been employed in Fremantle for years, Emily a type setter (?????) in Perth.
Mother hears wonderfully well, she is young looking for her (nearly) 58 years, she is keeping splendid health, & works hard. I have been afflicted for past five years with "Diabetes", given up by two Doctors. Thank God I am better than I was. I sometimes walk 6 or 7 miles in a day. I have long ceased business. I'm boycotted by reason of age, although my faculties are as keen and vivid as ever. I could still sail around most of the Auctioneers I hear around me, and my business capacity is as keen and as active as ever, only I have committed two unpardonable offenses against society. Lost my "shekels" and my hair grown white. When you last saw me, I was in receipt of ú4,000 per year. Now my sole income is the Old Age Pension.
Bobby Burns lament has overtaken me, "Age & Poverty, ill assorted pair. "Still I have one Friend sticks closer to me than a brother. I would counsel you, in the morning of your life to take Him to your heart, Jesus, the sinner's friend. What would I do without him now in the eventide of life ?
We shall be so glad to hear from you often & if you ever come to Perth, make our house your home.
Mother joins with me in love to you,
Believe me,
Your affectionate uncle,
Thos. Rosling
P.S. I omitted my son "Bertie" fine young man in your employ. I think he is 6 foot and a very artistic and good son. I think in his 23rd year. TR
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar in Penshurst, Victoria, sent a letter dated 2 August 1911. Dear Cousin
I received your letter also one from Preston which I enclose. I rec'd a letter from Vivian, he has been ill some heart trouble but is now better. He says you would like to see the Preston letter, enclosed you will find it. I am under the impression Vivian could give more information as to the Dunbar Killigrew properties if he wished. I think the Killigrew wills also the Major's ought to throw a lot of light on the subject. Which I imagine can be seen the records of which will surely have been kept. I notice that in the family table I have that Lord Baron Duffus held some records? which he would be pleased to allow the family of Dunbar to examine.
There is a Mrs Cecilia Carpenter in Dublin who wrote me some years ago and called herself my aunt. She said I was the heir to the major's estate and that I was entitled to a large sum of money & properties.
Since my losses I have not been in correspondence with any of the family but lately they have been writing me. I had no idea there were so many of us. I always thought I was the last of the line. The Revd Hallahan Dunbar, who died in California, when here also told me that I might expect at any time to become a very rich man & in those days I had enough of my own but the bank failure took it all and I have had to battle ever since and am thankful to be as well off as I am. I have a good family who through my marriage have reverted to the old faith so I have no children so far as the church is concerned.
The Hallahan family of Dublin - my grandmother was one of them: ought to know some of the family history.
One was a surgeon in Dublin the other was a CE Reverend of St Patrick’s Cathedral and I was educated for the church but would not take kindly to it, too fond of spirit I suppose.
Some years ago a London lawyer Mr Philpot wrote me about this matter but unfortunately my lawyer advised me to not have any thing to do with him which I now see was a mistake. Philpot’s firm I understand were lawyers to the Major. If you will take this business in hand and look into it and there is anything in it I am prepared to treat liberally with you and make an agreement. If as I think if the agents hold the information that is necessary they will have to be arranged with and you would being on the ground be better able to treat with them. A half loaf is better than none. If there was no claim why are the agents making inquiries. "Where have the 2400 acres of land in the north of Ireland gone and the Garrison Estate in Galway. The Arwenack Devonshire 'Lord Loftus' London, Chelmsford Essex. The properties. They, so Vivian says, were spread over Cornwall, London, Essex, Devonshire, possibly in Staffordshire & Lincoln. I suppose Vivian has given you this information before. I would like to hear from your mother very much and send my kindest regards. I will ask my daughter Jean to write to her and try and send some portraits. Of your mothers I would like to have. I have not had mine taken or would send it but later on when I next get to Melbourne I will make it my business to call on your brother but in the meantime will write him.
With kindest regards and best wishes to yourself & mother to whom I will write myself soon. I am a poor correspondent.
Believe me.. Yours sincerely, John K Dunbar, Penshurst, Victoria
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 8 August 1911. Nambour, Queensland, Aug. 8th 1911
Dear Cousin,
Yours of 2nd inst. to hand. I am now out of the Doctor's hands, and shall start South about the end of the month. If Preston had anything tangible to go on he would have communicated with you long ago. Philpott took up the Arwenack case on his own responsibility and at his own risk. Preston has probably 12 adverts. referring to Major J.K. Dunbar and his descendants, but equally probably not one would be worth anything to you. I have seen half-a-dozen at least, but they were inquiries such as we are making now.
G.K. of Sydney seems a self-reliant and level headed young fellow. De Bernardy's agent interviewed him some time ago, but I do not know any particulars.
Ted Stott has all the information I can give him. You must bear in mind that I have no family documents, and that I left home when a boy, and have had no intercourse with the former generations of Dunbars for 40 years, excepting with Uncle Fred. (Captain), and the information from him was interesting rather than useful. He like the rest of us could give no definite information. Cousin Dora sent me a letter she had last month from your cousin Elizabeth at home (the Parson's wife): she certainly holds no expectations, and seemingly knows nothing whatsoever of the Killigrew property, tho' she has heard at different times of great sums that should have come to the family: but evidently never got particulars.
Let us hope that E. Stott will get on the track, if track there be, or better still, that Preston or some other lawyer will find out there is something to go on and go.
With best wishes,
Yours sincerely,
E.H.V. Dunbar
A MARGINAL POSTSCRIPT: Do not be tempted to spend money on Preston's word: If they be worth anything he will act you may be sure
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Hussey Stott dated 13 September 1911. 5 Belvedere Rd, Bexley Heath, 13th Sept 1911
Dear Cousin,
Yours of 2nd August to hand this week: thanks. I return Preston's letter. This man is merely a "fee snatcher"; there are many such on this side -- and probably the genus is not unknown in Australia! Even supposing "The Careful Search" he proposes to make on payment of several guineas resulted in any material facts coming to light, he would want you to undertake to pay a heavy percentage on any monies recovered. If the money is recoverable, there are more reliable and much cheaper methods of proceeding, the best of which is to instruct a decent solicitor -- who would by virtue of his profession have access to the same records that Preston and his ilk have, and who would be infinitely more likely to advise you at an early stage if they saw the likelyhood of any advantage accruing. Be assured that I will advise you if at any time I get hold of information.
You say you think it probable that my uncle (E.H.V.D.) has not given you as much information as he might. I rather think you are mistaken in his. I should say that he is of a peculiarly frank disposition & unlikely to with-hold anything that may be of interest to you, even tho' he doesn't profit by it, while if he is likely to profit by the possession of certain knowledge relating to the D -- K business obviously his interests, and yours, and those of the family in general are identical, and it would be ridiculous for him to with-hold anything.
Regarding the properties at one time held by Major J.K.D. referred to in yours. The Garrison Estate was sold -- with other possessions in North of Ireland, about 1836 to a relative one of the Archdalls -- I believe (but on this point my uncle could perhaps give you more information) and the Essex property was sold in 1790 (or thereabouts) to a man with whose descendants I am on somewhat intimate -- or anyrate, friendly terms.
I have a draft of the Conveyance of this Essex property in my possession, so you may dismiss that entirely from your calculation. Regarding the other property, I am given to understand that the Major was involved in a heavy lawsuit and to all appearances he came off second best. This being so, it is unlikely that his descendants could at this distance in time upset the legal decision. So it appears to us that your interest -- and possibly the interests of the whole of the Major's descendants -- are confined to anything he had after his defeat in the Law Courts.
I should say from what I know of his life that the Major died intestate. I mean that he was at loggerheads with his 2nd wife, and it is hardly likely that he would leave his affairs in good trim! This is merely a surmise. He died at Abbeville, France, sometime in the early 50's, I think.
We should be glad to hear from your daughter, as you suggest, and my mother would be willing to enter into a correspondance.
If you like to keep me informed of any steps with the K--D business which come directly under your notice I will do what I can to assist, but at present my advice is to leave Preston and similar concerns severely alone. I have written at some length, but I hope my letter is intelligible.
Yours sincerely,
E.H.H. Stott
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 23 October 1911. c/- Mr.E. Wolff, Railway Avenue. Drouin
23-10-11
Dear Cousin,
I have been hunting up, both in Sydney and Melbourne Public Libraries, books for information re Dunbars and their connections. I obtained a lot of more or less interest. One item I consider important. In the "Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland" edited by Sir A. Vicars is placed "The will of George Dunbar" dated 1807. This as I take it is the will which led to the final downfall of the family in Ireland. I have sent this information home to E. Stott. (A MARGINAL NOTE:- "Only the name of the testator (with place and date) is given: nothing of the contents)
There is also in same book "The Will of John Dunbar, Ballycarney, Co. Carlow, dated 1724." This presumably also our ancestor of that ilk.
Again here is indexed "The Will of John Dunbar, Dublin 1764" who may or may not have been the father of George Dunbar aforementioned.
"Prerogative" Wills are (or were) of great importance and are kept, apparently, under special circumstances. None have been named since 1850, or thereabouts. The term is a technical one, and I do not know its meaning.
There is a very full account of the KiIligrew families in "Cornish Worthies" by Tregallis in Melbourne Library.
Anne, widow of H. Agar was George Dunbar's 1st wife. The daughter and heiress of the last of the Killigrews (mainline) was his 2nd wife by whom he had one son John Killigrew Dunbar born in Dublin: 16 May 1769. This last paragraph is complied from a book, also in the Melbourne Library entitled "Members of Parliament for Kilkenny" by Burtchell. From this book I conclude that during the 18th century the Dunbars spent nearly all their time in Carlow & Kilkenny & Dublin City, and had comparatively little to do with Fermanagh. And I further conclude that for the past 50 years that the members of the family know little or nothing about their forebears. Even Captain Fred. whom I knew intimately for 12 or 13 years did not know anything of Arwenack or Chelmsford properties. Like the others, he knew that there had been property but did not know any particulars. He believed too, that Philpott was not honest, that the Arwenack business was a fraud in fact.
Unless the will of 1807 gives something definite to go on, I shall regard the Millions as mythical.
Taylor, (De Bernardy's agent) will be back from England next week, but I fancy that he would have written at once had he anything to write about. I shall not see him.
I am staying with Cousin Dora at present and shall be here for 2 or 3 weeks. I saw your sister (Mrs.McCraith) and Irene when in town: also my nephew and family. I am feeling better but not as well as I expected to be. However, I am enjoying myself in a quiet sort of way, notwithstanding that I am "Sine Spe" so far as the family luck is concerned.
With kind regards
Yours sincerely
E.H.V. Dunbar
A SECOND MARGINAL NOTE :- The word Killigrew signifies "The Wood of the Eagles", or "The Eagle of the Wood", only found that out last week
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 27 October 1911. c/- Mr E Wolff, Railway Avenue, Drouin
27-10-11
Dear Cousin,
I return you E. Stott's letter of 13 Sept. last: it is worth keeping: he is one of the few sensible members of the family born within the last 100 years. As I have already told you, there is no fact connected with the D--Killw. history, with which I am aquainted, that I have not related to you or George or both. I have spent a great deal of time both reading and writing on the matter, and have now finished with it, excepting so far as I will answer any questions put to me: but I am taking no further trouble. E. Stott and George K.D. are the two who may be able to do something in the future. The former as a lawyer will find out something definite in all probability, but that it will benefit any of the family is in my opinion extremely doubtful. However, let us remain Sub Spe if Sine expectatione (do not know if this is good Latin)
I do not think that I shall be able to visit you as I must go on another long trip to near the N.S.W. border, due north of Melbourne, and I cannot do both journeys. I am pressed now for both time and money. I had to have a long rest in Sydney and am having another rest in Drouin.
Hoping we will meet under happy auspices someday in the near future & with best wishes for you & yours,
I am, Sincerely yours,
E.H.V. Dunbar
PS I knew Dora's mother & grandfather in Ireland
MARGINAL NOTE:- The Rev. J. Dunbar willed all he had (or might be entitled to) to his daughter Frances: Dora is her only child and heiress. NB You & Dora must come before any other members of the family
. John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was mentioned in a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 1 January 1912. Nambour, Queensland. 1-1-12
Dear Cousin Jean
Many thanks for your greetings, the first to reach me this year: and I may add that this is the first note written by me this year.
As you see by the above address, I have got back to Nambour Town and am glad of the same, not that Nambour is a very delightful locality, but because I am having a delightful rest.
I have had a thorough overhauling at the hands of my Doctor and he tells me that the trouble for which he treated me last July has disappeared and I am - for my age - fairly sound in wind and limb.
I feel now that I could enjoy a slice of the Killigrew estate if it were to come my way, and I am all the sorrier that I can only regard it as a castle in the air.
I have had my photograph taken and expect the copies in a day or two, when I shall send you one instead of a New Year's card.
Wishing you all a prosperous year,
Very sincerely yours,
E.H.V. Dunbar
Tell your father a "prerogative will" is one which deals with properties in 2 or more dioceses or Counties. George Dunbar's will (1807) probably dealt with properties in Carlow, Fermanagh, Cornwall, Devon and, I believe, Lincolnshire, besides other places. Perhaps there is no harm in hopinq but blessed are the that expect nothing and are not sorry when they get it
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     John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar received a letter from Edward Henry Vivian Dunbar dated 11 February 1912. Nambour, Queensland, 11-2-12
     Dear Cousin,
     J. Stott's address is 19 Spencer Grove Glenferrie. I am sorry that we did not meet last year, but I had to go to Gippsland and also to Picola, and neither my health or my pocket would allow me to get to Penshurst which really meant another long journey. Had you been either on the Drouin or Goulbourn line I could have managed. It is to be hoped that one of us gets a windfall some day before the other dies, then we will have a glass together. (Mine is John Jameison when I can get it.) But seriously, I do not expect to ever again have a ten-pound note to spare on a holiday.
     There has been no news from England since I wrote last, and I do not expect any in the future, until I hear that Preston or Brenardy has taken up, at his own risk, whatever may be connected with the Killigrew property.
     I forget if I ever sent you a photograph (of myself) some years ago. I got no acknowledgment from Jean that she got the postcard. Perhaps she was disappointed in my appearance.
     Kind regards to all, Yours sincerely,
     E.H.V. Dunbar
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     John and Margaret were registered as John Killigrew Dunbar, wheelwright, Margaret Ann Dunbar, home duties, JeanAdelaine, book-keeper & George Killigrew, carpenter at Penshurst, Victoria, on the 1914 electoral roll.
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was listed in a directory dated 1916 as John K Dunbar at Box Hill.
     John and Margaret were registered as Dorothy Elizabeth, home duties, GTK carpenter, JTK no occupation, Margaret,home duties & Jean Adeline Dunbar, clerk at 24 Ellingworth Pde, Box Hill, Victoria, on the 1919 electoral roll.
His niece Jessie Lessels recalled her uncle Jack as being "a bit of a waste. His wife - she was just one of the crowd, but she was such a nice old lady. I stayed with them a while." "Hopeless - he would sooner sit all day than go to work ... Aunt Maggie was a fine old lady. They were as poor as get out, not that they could help that ... but he didn't help things."
His wife Margaret Dunbar, but not John, was mentioned in her mother-in-law's will, Dec 1886.
John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar was listed in a directory dated from 1920-1924 at Ellingworth Parade, Box Hill.
     John died on 1 February 1921 in 24 Ellingworth St, Box Hill, Victoria, aged 68. DUNBAR. — On the 1st February (suddenly), at his residence, Ellingworth parade, Box Hill, John Killegrew, loving husband of Margaret, and eldest son of the late George and Anne Dunbar, of Dandenong, and grandson of the late Rev. John Dunbarar, Rector of Bally-bay, Fermanagh. county Monahan, Ireland and loved eldest brother of Mrs. Rosling, of? Perth, W.A.. and Mrs M'Craith. 255 Barkly-iStreet, St. Kilda, aged 68 years. Privately interred
Box Hill,
The Box Hill re;orteer on 25 Feb 1921,
added. OBITUARY. MR. J, K. DUNBAR.
The sudden demise occurred at hisresidence, Ellingworth parade, Box Hill, on February 2, of Mr. John Killigrew Dunbar, at the age of 66 years. The deceased gentleman was the eldest son of the late George and Anne Dunbar, who for many years were the proprietors of the well-known hostel, Dunbar's Hotel, Dandenong, in the old coaching days when relays of Cobb's line of coaches ran from Sale to Melbourne, and were not much slower than our present train service. Dunbar's Hotel was the changing place and booking office.
The late John Dunbar was the first white child born in Dandenong, and aas educated at the local State school. Afterwards he was apprenticed to a coachbuilder and general blacksmith, and subsequently acquired a lease of the business, which he relinquished to start a business of his own up country. He was a lieutenant in the Southern Troop of Light Horse. His father was the son of the late Rev John Dunbar, Rector of Ballybay Fermanagh, County Monahan, Ireland, came out to Victoria in a sailng vessel owned and manned by his uncle Captain Dunbar. The late Mr Dunbar married Margaret, daughter of the late Mr and Mrs M Green of Diamond Hill, Dandenong, and leaves a widow and grown-up family of sons and daughters to mourn daughters to mourn their loss. The remains were interred privately at Box Hill.
. He was buried on 2 February 1921 in Box Hill.
DUNBAR - In loving memory of our dear mother, Margaret Ann Dunbar, who passed away May 16, 1925 ; also our dear father, John Killigrew Dunbar, who passed away February 2, 1921.
God grant to them eternal rest.
-(Dorothy and Hugh O'Rorke.)
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Children of John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar and Margaret Ann Green

John Vivian Sidney Dunbar

(30 June 1858 - )
     John Vivian Sidney Dunbar was born on 30 June 1858 in 84 Capel St, Dublin. He was described as the son of John & Cecilia Dunbar, gent and baptised at St Mary's Dublin, but no date given for the baptism, but before 5 Dec. He was the son of Cecilia Dunbar. John Vivian Sidney Dunbar was christened before 5 December 1858 in St Mary, Dublin.
Edward H V Dunbar in 1911 mentions his younger brother and sister living at Ballybay rectory for a long time after their father's death in 1865..

Joseph Dunbar

(11 December 1718 - 7 October 1794)
     Joseph Dunbar was also known as (of Burgie and West Grange) in records. He was christened on 11 December 1718 in Rafford, Moray. He was an infant at his father's death. He was the son of Ludovick Dunbar and Elizabeth Dunbar.
In 1722 Ludovick Dunbar conveyed the lands of West Grange to his young son Joseph.
He was in considerable debt by 1741.
Joseph Dunbar married Sophia Campbell, daughter of Alexander Campbell (Of Delnies) and Ann Brodie, before 1761.
     Joseph died on 7 October 1794 in Rafford, Moray, aged 75. He was buried at Rafford, but also testament 7 Oct 1794. He was buried in Rafford.

Child of Joseph Dunbar and Sophia Campbell