Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Easterbin) in records.
     Patrick Dunbar married Agnes Dunbar (Dunbar), daughter of Ninian Dunbar and Finduella Christian? Dunbar. Patrick Dunbar was the son of Robert Dunbar.

Patrick Dunbar

      Patrick, succeeded his father Edgar in the lands of Caistron. He or descendants took the name of Caistron or Kestern, the last owner of the lands, John of Kestern, parting with them to the Abbey of Newminster about 1247 or a little later.. Patrick Dunbar was the son of Edgar Dunbar.

Patrick Dunbar

(1304 - before 5 September 1351)
     Patrick Dunbar was born in 1304. He was the son of Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl and Ermengarde de Soulis.
     Patrick died before 5 September 1351.

Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Sanquhar) in records. He was the son of Alexander Dunbar.
     Patrick Dunbar lived at Sanquhar, Forres, Moray, September 1560. He was granted the Sanqhuar estate by his father.

Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was the son of David Dunbar.
     Patrick Dunbar and Alexander Dunbar were made legitimate between 1554-1555 when David Dunbar was named as the father. Et de xls compositionis legitimationis concesse Patricio Dunbar et Alexandro Dunbar filiis Magistri David Dunbar decani Moraviensis.
     15 May 1575: Discharge by Alexander Dunbar of Boith [Boath] to Huchon Ross of Kilrawok [Kilravock] of a charter of confirmation by the queen's grace upon lands of Petquhine, and a legitimation under great seal given to granter and Patrick Dunbar, his brother.

Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was the son of Rev John Dunbar and Marion Sutherland. Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Mefts) in records.
     Alexander of Bennetchfeild, his wife Margaret Innes and his brother Patrick are mentioned in a deed in 1674.

Child of Patrick Dunbar

Patrick Dunbar

( - before 26 July 1597)
     Patrick died before 26 July 1597 in Kilconquhar, Fife.
     His will was proved on 26 July 1597 at St Andrews. Patrik Dunbar, cotter in Kilconquhar.

Patrick Dunbar

( - 27 October 1686)
     Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Tilliglens) in records.
     Patrick was buried on 27 October 1686.
     His will was proved on 24 May 1688 at Moray.

Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Westerton) in records.
     Patrick Dunbar married Margaret Dunbar, daughter of Robert Dunbar and Isobel Sharpe.

Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was the son of Thomas Dunbar and Janet Dunbar (Dunbar) (of Westfield).

Patrick Dunbar

     Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Boghole) in records.
     Patrick Dunbar married Isobel Dunbar, daughter of Alexander Dunbar and Katherine Reid.

Sir Patrick Dunbar

(before 1310 - after 1356)
     Warrick, 1899 states that Isabella (Geilis) married John Dunbar, the brother of Patrick, the 9th Earl.
     Sir Patrick, in 1331, as son of Sir Alexander, son of the Earl, quit-claimed his rights in Swinwood to the monks of Coldingham. He was present at the battle of Durham in 1316, and also at Poictiers in 1356; but died and was buried at Candia, on his way to the Holy Land in 1356-57. Sir Patrick Dunbar was also known as Patrick Dunbar (of Wester Spott) in records. He was born before 1310. Some sources state the father of George & John was John the younger brother of Patrick the 9th earl of Dunbar. He was the son of Sir Alexander Dunbar.
     Sir Patrick Dunbar married Isabella Randolph, daughter of Thomas Randolph Earl of Moray and Isabel Stewart, circa 1320. He married, perhaps as his second wife, Isabella, younger daughter of Thomas Randolph, first Earl of Moray.
     Charter of Patrick de Dunbar, son of Lord Alexander, son of the Earl of Dunbar, granting and quitclaiming in the Prior's court at Ayton, on Wednesday after the Feast of St John the Baptist, to Adam de Pontefract, Prior, and the Convent of Coldingham, ½ carrucate of land in Swinewood, which he bought from Thomas, son of Ralph. Witnesses: Lord Robert de Lawedre, Justiciar of Lothian, Robert de Lawedre his son, sheriff, Henry de Prendergest, Hugh Giffard, John de Rayngton, Henry de Swinton, Gilbert de Lumsden, Roger de Lumsden, John de Paxton , and many others, Given at Lower Ayton Wednesday after the Feast of St John Baptist [26 June or 4 September] 1331.
     He fought against the English at Neville's Cross in 1346 and poitiers in 1356.
     Sir Patrick's seal, attached to the writ of 1352, shows a lion rampant within a double tressure. Legend, 'SIGILLVM PATRICII DE DVNBAR.' His wife's seal shows a shield with impaled arms, the first of husband and wife known in Scotland. Dexter, a lion rampant, within a royal tressure; sinister, three cushions in a royal tressure for Randolph. Legend, 'SIGILL ISABEL DE DUNBAR.
     Patrick died after 1356 in Candia, Crete, Greece. He was en route to the Holy Land. Some sources say 1358. He was buried in Candia.

Children of Sir Patrick Dunbar and Isabella Randolph

Sir Patrick Dunbar

     Sir Patrick Dunbar was born in Scotland. He was the son of George Dunbar 10th Earl and Christiana Wardlaw.
     Sometimes styled "of Beil" which is in East Lothian and succeeded his brother David, and obtained Mochrum from his father.
     Paul states: Patrick, named fourth in writ of 1390 and in the safe conduct. In June 1407 he received a sum of money for his father and mother. In 1410 he, 'not less skilfully than manfully,' took the fortalice of Fastcastle, then held by Thomas Holden, an Englishman, who, while he abode there, committed many evils in Lothian, both by sea and land.' Douglas styles him Sir Patrick Dunbar of Bele, but the latter was his uncle.
     Sir Patrick Dunbar was mentioned on 23 November 1411.

Sir Patrick Dunbar

( - circa 1576)
     Sir Patrick Dunbar was born in Cumnock, Ayrshire. He was the son of Sir Alexander Dunbar and Margaret Falconer.
     Sir Patrick Dunbar married Janet Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon Master of Sutherland and Lady Janet Stewart, in 1537 or 1553?. She was the daughter of Alexander Gordon, Master of Sutherland & sister of John 14th Earl of Sutherland. They married by a dispensation from the Pope on account on consanguity..
     Sir Patrick Dunbar was made legitimate between 1554 and 1555 when an unknown person was named as the father. Et de viije li? comp. bonorum escheatorum Patricii Dunbar, filiis et heredis apparentis Alexander Dunbar of Cumnock, Alex Brody de eodam et..., concessorum Alexander Priori de Pluscarden et Magistro Davidi Dunbar decano Moraviensi. He was Sheriff of Elgin, Moray, Scotland.
     Patrick died circa 1576. He's heir was Sir Alexander Dunbar on 28 December 1604. Alexander Dumbar de Westfield, heir male of Patrick Dunbar of Cumnok, avi (grand-father) - in officio vicecomitatus de Elgin et Forres .... Castelhill de Forres.

Children of Sir Patrick Dunbar

Sir Patrick Dunbar

(before 1405 - before 1437)
     Sir Patrick Dunbar was born before 1405. He was the son of Sir David Dunbar.
     Patrick died before 1437.

Children of Sir Patrick Dunbar

Patrick (II) Dunbar 6th Earl

(circa 1185 - between 14 April 1248 and 13 December 1248)
     Patrick (II) Dunbar 6th Earl was born circa 1185. He succeeded his father at the age of 46 in 1232. He was the son of Patrick Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar and Ada, of Scotland.
     Patrick (II) Dunbar 6th Earl married Euphemia Brus, daughter of William de Brus and Christina FitzAlan (Bruce), before 1213. It was thought he married Euphemia, daughter of Walter, the third High Steward of Scotland, with whom he received the estate of Birkynside, in Lauderdale, which he burdened with a merk of silver to be paid yearly for the benefit of the church of Dryburgh. The Countess survived her husband, dying perhaps in or about 1267. From the chronicler of Lanercost, who tells a somewhat decorated anecdote of the strained relations between her and her eldest son, we learn she resided, in her later years, at Whittinghame, in East Lothian. The same writer also states that he was present when mother and son were reconciled at her deathbed, he asking her forgiveness. Cokayne's corrigenda refutes this and makes his wife his stepsister.
     In 1232 he succeeded his father as Earl of Dunbar. In 1235 he was in command of the army sent against the Bastard of Galloway, whom he subdued. He acted as guarantor of a treaty with England in 1237 and again in 1244.
He was in charge of a Scottish army which left Scotland in November 1247 to join the French King Louis IX's crusade, but died at Marseille between May and December 1248. His widow Euphemia lived at Whittingham in East Lothian, and died probably about 1267..
     Lord Hailes calls him the most powerful baron of the southern districts of Scotland. He held the first rank among the 24 barons who guaranteed the treaty of peace with England in 1244. He died while on the crusade with Louis IX of France. [The Scottish nation, p.74]
]Patrick, sixth Earl of Dunbar, succeeded his father on 31 December 1232, but had taken an active part in dealing with the estate some time before that date. A month or so after his accession, he did homage to King Henry III for his English estates, and from the various inquisitions on the subject we learn the extent of his lands in Northumberland. On 22 February 1233 the King ordered sasine to be given, but in 1247, another inquiry was made enumerating not only the lands but the holders of them under the Earl.'
In 1235 the Earl took an active part In suppressing the rebellion in Galloway.' In 1237, when King Alexander of Scotland resigned his rights to the three northern counties of England, Earl Patrick was the first of the Scottish magnates who became sureties for the fulfilment of the treaty. It was this Earl, and not his father as has been stated, who in 1245 took part in an attempt to settle a dispute as to marches between the Canons of Carham, and Bernard de Hawden, a neighbouring landowner on the Scottish side, which involved a settlement of the boundaries between the two countries.'
In 1247, owing, it is said, to remorse for injury done by him to the monastic house of Tynemouth, a cell of St. Albans,' in his irritation at the long dispute between the lords of Beanley and the monks as to the churches of Bewick and Eglingham, Earl Patrick made up his mind to join the crusade to the Holy Land, projected by King Louis IX of France. To defray expenses he sold or transferred his stud of horses in Lauderdale, to the Abbot and Convent of Melrose. The sale took place on 29 August 1247, and was confirmed by King Alexander ii. on 28 November same year.' A few months later the Earl had started on his journey. His last transaction In Scotland appears to have been a confirmation on 14 April 1248, of a grant by Mr. William of Greenlaw, to the monks of Melrose, which the Earl made in the presence of King Alexander at Berwick, and before 28 June he had left the country.' But he never reached Palestine, as his death at Marseilles is recorded by the chronicler of Lanercost. The same writer tells also two stories which give us a very favourable view of the Earl's character. One is that the Earl had issued invitations to a feast, but many more guests arrived than preparation had been made for. When his steward informed him of the lack of provision thus caused, the Earl ordered the kitchen to be set on fire, risking rather the loss of his house than the tarnishing of his reputation for hospitality. The other story, for which the narrator vouches, concerns his forgiving and lenient conduct to a robber whom he had rescued from the gallows and placed in a position of trust, but who tried to murder his master. The Earl, however, made light of it, and gave the rascal money to escape.
This Earl had two great seals, and two privy seals. The first great seal, used during his father's lifetime, round, shows an equestrian figure riding to sinister. with a sword raised in his right hand. He wears a square-topped helmet and carries a heater-shaped shield without any device. Legend, 'SIGILL. PATRICII FILII COMITIS PATRICII' His seal as Earl is also round, showing an equestrian figure riding to dexter, wearing a flat-topped helmet, having a sword in right hand, and carrying on left arm a heater-shaped shield charged with a lion rampant. Legend, 'SIGILLUM PATRICII COMITIS DE DVNBAR.' One of his privy seals shows a lion rampant, with legend,"' SECRETVM P. COMIT."
According to the Lanercost chronicler Earl Patrick and his wife had several children, and a William and a Robert appear in the writ of 14 April 1248, as if they were sons of the Earl. But by comparison of writs it would rather appear that they were his brothers. (See under the fifth Earl.)
     He led troops in suppression of the rebel Bastard of Galloway in 1235.
     Patrick died en route to join the Crusade of (St) Louis IX of France between 14 April 1248 and 13 December 1248 in Marseilles, France.

Children of Patrick (II) Dunbar 6th Earl and Euphemia Brus

Patrick (III) Dunbar 7th Earl

(before 13 December 1213 - 24 August 1289)
     Patrick (III) Dunbar 7th Earl was born before 13 December 1213. He was the son of Patrick (II) Dunbar 6th Earl and Euphemia Brus.
     Patrick (d. 24 Aug 1289) was aged 35 upon succeeding to the Earldom and to his lands in England, 13 Dec 1248.
     Patrick (III) Dunbar 7th Earl married Cecilia Fraser? 13 Dec 1248 or 1242. The Earl's only recorded wife and the mother of his sons was a lady named in a charter by her eldest son, 'Cecilia filia Johannis.' No other designation of her has been found. It has been suggested that she was a Fraser, but there is no satisfactory evidence of this. Patrick was co-Regent of Scotland. He was a member of a pro-English group of Scots nobility, which managed to get the boy King Alexander III away from the dominance of the Comyn family, becoming in consequence 1255 Regent of Scotland and guardian to Alexander and his young consort (daughter of Henry III of England) in 1255.
     Patrick, seventh Earl of Dunbar, is said by the Lanercost chronicler to have been very dissimilar in character to his father. Nothing is known of him before his accession, but after that event he took an active part in politics, especially during the earlier years of the young King Alexander III. He was a steadfast adherent of the English party, and in 1255 he and others procured the dismissal of the Comyns and their faction from power. Earl Patrick's name stands fourth in the list of the new Council who had the support of King Henry III, the young King's father-in-law. In 1258, however, the Comyns again prevailed, and Earl Patrick was excluded from the Government, though in 1260 he was one of the Scottish nobles to whose keeping King Henry III promised to in trust the expected infant child of the Queen of Scotland, then at the English Court. He commanded a division of the Scottish army at the battle of Largs in 1263, and he was present at the signing of the treaty between King Alexander III. and the King of Norway, on 10 July 1266. After this, little is recorded regarding the Earl, except some charters and some personal matters, such as legal proceedings, chiefly affecting his Northumbrian property. He was, however, one of the witnesses to the marriage-contract between the Princess Margaret of Scotland and Eric, King of Norway, at Roxburgh, 25 July 1281; and in February 1284, after the death of Prince Alexander, the Earl, though advanced in years, attended the Parliament at Scone which declared the Princess Margaret of Norway to be heir to the Scottish Crown. He was also one of those who obliged themselves to carry out that Act of Parliament. He and his three sons joined with the Bruces, the principals of the Stewart family, and Macdonalds, in a bond or compact for mutual defence and assistance, dated at Turnberry, Bruce's stronghold in Carrick, on 20 September 1286; but he did not long survive, as he died 24 August 1289, at Whittinghame in East Lothian, aged seventy-six, and was buried in the north aisle of the church of Dunbar.
This Earl had two great and two privy seals. The first, which has a secretum at the back, shows an equestrian figure carrying a raised sword in his right hand, and suspended from the neck a shield charged with a lion rampant contourne. The square topped helmet has on it a crescent. Some state that the crescent encloses a cross, but the cross appears to be only that usually precAng the legend, which is 'SIGILLVM PATRICII COMITIS DE DVNBAR.' The secretum shows a shield bearing a lion rampant contourne'. Legend, 'SIGILL. AMORIS.' The second seal shows an equestrian figure similar to the above, but the horse housings have a chequered pattern SIGILLVM PATRICII COMITIS DE DVNBAR." The earliest privy seal, about 1261, shows on a shield a lion rampant within an orle of eight roses.' Legend, 's. PATRICII COMITIS D' DVMAR'.
     He commanded a divison of the Scottish army in the victory over Norsemen at Larges in 1263.
     John P. Ravilious on 3 November, 2004, wrote: Following the death of King Alexander III in 1286, a period of uncertainty ensued in Scotland which (one could argue) lasted until the Scots victory at Bannockburn in June 1314. Early in this period Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale and "next in line" (so he
thought) to the Scots throne after Alexander's infant granddaughter in Norway, sought to protect his present position and future possibilities by entering into an agreement with a number of Scots and Irish magnates, thereafter frequently referred to as the "Turnberry Band".
Politically, the agreement at Turnberry has been the subject of much discussion and debate. In genealogical terms, the agreement merits some reconsideration given the evidence recently discussed concerning the relationships of the Earls of Dunbar to the Bruce Lords of Annandale and others [1].
The following is an accurate, if abbreviated, rendering of the agreement (the full Latin text will follow in a 2nd post):
"Bond by Patrick Earl of Dunbar, Patrick, John, and Alexander his sons, Walter Stewart, Earl of Menteith, Alexander and John his sons, Robert of Bruce, Lord of Annandale, and Robert of Bruce, Earl of Carrick, and Richard of Bruce his sons, James, Steward of Scotland, and John his brother, Enegus, son of Dovenald, and Alexander his lawful son, whereby they engage to adhere to Sir Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster, and Sir Thomas of Clare in all their affairs, and to stand faithfully by them and their accomplices against all their adversaries, saving their fidelity to the King of England, and also to him who should obtain the kingdom of Scotland by reason of relationship to Alexander King of Scotland last deceased.
At Turnebyry in Carrick, on the eve of St Matthew, 20th September 1286.... " [2]
The following chart reflects the common descent of all the Scots lords who agreed to this bond from Walter fitz Alan the Steward (d. 1177). In fact, Patrick, Earl of Dunbar and Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale are shown to have been 1st cousins: they were also 2nd cousins 1x removed, by common descent from Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumberland and Huntingdon (d. 1152) and Ada de Warenne. Walter le Stewart, Earl of Menteith was their 2nd
cousin: James le Stewart and his brother John (later of Bonkil), and Angus 'Mor' mac Donald of the Isles, were nephews of Earl Walter. ....
Although inadequately reflected, the Irish lords involved in the "Band" were closely linked if not related by this common Stewart descent. Thomas de Clare, of Inchiquin and Youghal, was the nephew of Robert de Brus' wife Isabel de Clare, and a first cousin of his sons Robert and Richard (namesake of Thomas' father Richard de Clare). Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (d. 1326), was the brother of Egidia (or Giles) de Burgh, the wife of James le Stewart.
Certainly the earls and lords who bound themselves by this agreement had their own particular interests at heart. The parts they would play in the subsequent history of Scotland range from the heroic (Sir John Stewart's death in 1298 as a captain at the Battle of Falkirk, fighting together with William Wallace comes to mind) to the infamous (John de Menteith is the Sir John who subsequently captured William Wallace in 1305, turning him over to English justice). However, we can now see that this group was more closely related than was previously understood, which provides a new perspective for further study of the Turnberry Band and other aspects of this period.
NOTES
[1] See SGM threads: <: CP Correction: Cristina, 2nd wife of Patrick, Earl of Dunbar (d. 1232)>, and , 29 October 2004. An ahnentafel for Patrick, Earl of Dunbar (d. 1308) is given in the SGM thread , 1 Nov 2004.

[2] The Red Book of Menteith II:xxxi, No. 12. The Latin text (to be provided in a followup post) is found at II:219-220 [also in Bain's Historical Documents Pertaining to Scotland I:22].
     Patrick died on 24 August 1289 in Whittingham, East Lothian. He was aged 76. He was buried in Dunbar. He was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held on 11 November 1289. He was forty-seven years of age when he succeeded his father, and was the first who openly assumed the title of Earl of March, though in his claim to the Crown he styles himself the third Earl. The usual inquest was held before he received possession of his English lands, but in 1293 Beanley and other estates were placed under arrest for his contumacy in delaying to answer a summons to show his right. They were, however, soon restored.

Children of Patrick (III) Dunbar 7th Earl and Cecilia Fraser?

Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl

(before 11 November 1242 - 10 October 1308)
     Patrick de Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar (-1289) was lord of the fortress of Dunbar, dominating much of Lothian, and the most important fiefholder in the border regions of Scotland against England. He descended, in an allegedly legitimate unbroken male line, from a member of Dunkeld and St.Columba clan, Maldred of Allerdale, a younger brother of the first Dunkeld King Duncan I of Scotland. (Maldred of Dunkeld allegedly also was a younger son of Princess Bethoc of Scotland.) He was the son of Patrick, 6th Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Patrick, 5th Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Patrick, 4th Earl of Dunbar, who was descendant in male line of Gospatrick, Earl of Northumbria and 1st lord of Dunbar, son of Maldred. Gospatrick descended from ancient Anglo-Saxon Earls of Northumbria, from whom both Dunbar's patrimony and Dunbar's claims to certain English lands are derived. The lords of Dunbar, Earls in the Scottish border were descended from Crinan of Dunkeld, whose younger son Maldred married Algitha, daughter of Ughtred, earl of Northumberland, by Elgiva, daughter of the Saxon king Ethelred the Unready. Maldred’s son Cospatrick, or Gospatric, was made earl of Northumberland by William the Conqueror; but being soon afterwards deprived of this position he fled to Scotland, where Malcolm III, King of Scotland, welcomed him and granted him Dunbar and the adjoining lands - he is counted as the 1st Earl of Dunbar. His successors controlled the marches, but the title Earl of March was only assumed by the eighth Earl of Dunbar, son of the 7th earl.
Thus, one of his son's claims to the kingship of Scotland was as the agnate of the House of Dunkeld, being (a) the closest agnate, and (b) a candidate based on tanistry of agnates of the house where the deceased Alexander III belonged to.
His grandfather, Patrick, 5th Earl of Dunbar, was son of the 4th Earl of Dunbar and his wife Ada, natural daughter of King William the Lion.
The 7th Earl was married with Marjory de Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan, allegedly descended from King Donald III Bane.
     'Patrick son of Lord Patrick, Earl of Dunbar ' ( " P. filius Domini P.
Comitis de Dunbar "), his son, confirmed grants of his father Earl Patrick in Laynal to Coldstream priory, witnessed by his son Patrick and brothers John and Alexander ("testibus P. de Dunbar filio nostro. Dominis Johanne Alexandro fratribus nostris") and others.
     This Earl's seal shows on a shield suspended by a guige, a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses. Legend, 'S. DNI PATRICII DE DVNBAR COM MARC'. Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl was born before 11 November 1242. Sir Patrick with the blak berd, eighth Earl of Dunbar, appears first as son of Earl Patrick, confirming grants by his father and his mother whom he styles 'Cecilia filia Johannis'. He was the son of Patrick (III) Dunbar 7th Earl and Cecilia Fraser?
     Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl lived at Beanley, Northumberland, England.
     In 1281 he was one of the witnesses to the marriage-contract of the Princess Margaret, already cited, and in 1286 he appears with his father and two younger brothers in the compact with Bruce at Turnberry.
     Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl married Marjory Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn Earl of Buchan and Elizabeth de Quinci/Quincy, circa 1282. The wife of this Earl is uncertain, as no record or reference to his Countess has been discovered. Sir Robert Douglas, in his Peerage, 1764, states, without giving proof, that the Earl married Marian, daughter of Duncan, tenth Earl of Fife, by whom he had two sons, Patrick and George, the latter being the alleged ancestor of the Dunbars of Cumnock. But this has not been substantiated. According to the later edition of Douglas, this Earl married Marjorie Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan, a statement founded on a letter, in 1400, by George, tenth Earl of March, to King Henry IV of England, when the Earl claims that a Marjorie Comyn was his 'graunde dame' or great-grandmother, and also states that she was 'full sister' of Alice Comyn, who, about 1306, married Sir Henry Beaumont and became great-grandmother of King Henry IV. Wyntoun, in his metrical Cronykil, states that 'the eldest' daughter, whom he does not name, of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan (vol. ii. of this work, p. 256), married a Patrick, Earl of Dunbar; but if she were Marjorie, she must have been the aunt and not the sister of Alice Comyn or Beaumont, and Earl George is so far wrong in his assertion. The eighth Earl is the only Earl Patrick whose date suits with a daughter of Alexander, Earl of Buchan, as they must have been contemporaries, but if Marjorie Comyn were the wife of the eighth Earl, it seems impossible that she could have been the great grandmother on the father's side of George, tenth Earl of March. It may be assumed, however, that Wyntoun is right, that this Earl Patrick did marry a Comyn, but that Earl George made a mistake as to his relationship to her.
     'Patricius', together with his father and brothers, entered into a bond with Robert de Brus, Walter, earl of Menteith and others at Turnberry, 20 Sept 1286 'to adhere to the party of Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster and Sir Thomas de Clare '.
     John Ravilious wrote: The "Turnberry Band" of 1286 was an agreement between several Scots lords, Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster and Sir Thomas de Clare... Among the parties to the agreement of 20 September 1286 were Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, and his sons Patrick, John and Alexander [1]. On that date, we know that Earl Patrick was aged 72 or more [2], and his eldest son Patrick was aged 43 or more [3]. We would reasonably place his third (known) son Alexander as being most likely aged say 30 and 40 on that date: this would yield a range for his birthdate between say 1246 and 1256. Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl was the heir of Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl at the Inquisition Post Mortem held on 11 November 1289. He was forty-seven years of age when he succeeded his father, and was the first who openly assumed the title of Earl of March, though in his claim to the Crown he styles himself the third Earl. The usual inquest was held before he received possession of his English lands, but in 1293 Beanley and other estates were placed under arrest for his contumacy in delaying to answer a summons to show his right. They were, however, soon restored. Patrick Earl of March in 1290.
     'Patrik de Dunbar ', one of the Earls of Scotland attended the Parliament at Brigham, which confirmed the Treaty of Salisbury with England, 14 Mar 1289/90.
But after the death of the 'Maid of Norway' he, with others, laid claim to the Crown of Scotland, on the ground that his great-grandfather Patrick, the fifth Earl, had married Ada, an illegitimate daughter of King William the Lion. But he soon withdrew from the competitorship.
     'Dunbar comes de Marchia, Patricius de (Patrik de Dunbar, comte de la Marche). ' - swore allegiance to King Edward I at Berwick, 1291 (Ragman Roll).
     He was a competitor for the Scottish crown, 1291/92[1]: following which, 'Patrick, earl of March', one of the auditors for the claim of Bruce at Berwick, 2 June 1292 [Crawfurd p. 20[9] ]

' Le Conte Patrike ', knight, serving with the army of King Edward I in Scotland, fought at the Battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298
: his arms are recorded as
' Gules a lion rampant a bordure argent semy of
cinquefoils of the field ' (Falkirk Roll H 23[10]).
     In 1294 he was called, with other Scottish magnates, to join King Edward I in his expedition against France. In 1295 his English lands were again taken into the King's hands, but only for a short period, and he remained faithful to Edward I when King John Baliol renounced his fealty.
     The Earl's wife held his castle of Dunbar against an English force in April 1297, but was obliged to surrender it with all the Scottish nobles who had taken refuge there after their defeat at Dunbar. Earl Patrick was then, or soon after, at the English court..
     In May 1298 he was appointed by Edward I captain of his garrison at Berwick, and in November he was made chief commander of the English forces south of the Forth, his jurisdiction extending as far as over Ayrshire. The Earl was still in the English interest in 1300, when King Edward made his march against Carlaverock Castle, and he and his ensigns armorial are duly recorded in the famous metrical account of the siege.
     For his service to the English service ( record dated at Newcastle- upon-Tyne dated 19 Nov 1298): ' Appointment of Patrick de Dumbar, earl of March, as captain (cheventain) of the king's men-at-arms of the castles and other places, who are in garrison in the marches and elsewhere this side the sea of Scotland, towards the eastern sea.
     In 1305 he was elected one of the Scottish commissioners to the English Parliament, but failed to attend, and Sir John Menteith was, by the King's order, chosen in his stead.
     He interceded with King Edward I on behalf of his cousin Alan de
Clavering: record of a pardon for his death, granted by King Edward I at Wolvesey, 27 April 1306:' Pardon, at the instance of Patrick de Dunbar, earl of March, Ingram de Umframvill, John de Moubray and Alexander de Abernithi, to Alan de Clavering, in consideration of the service of Robert son of Roger, for the death of Roger de Clavering his brother. By p.s..
     Patrick died on 10 October 1308. In July 1307 Edward I died, but the Earl continued to adhere to his successor, though he did not long survive, as he died on 10 October 1308, aged sixty-six.
     Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl was the subject of an Inquisition Post Mortem held on 8 November 1308.
     The numbering of the Earls is problematic.
Will Johnson of Gen-Medieval mailing list wrote: Patrick de Dunbar, 8th Earl of Dunbar (c. 1242-1308), became recognized as the Earl of the Scottish March, being lord of the fortress of Dunbar, dominating much of Lothian, and being the most important fiefholder in the border regions of Scotland against England. He descended from ancient Anglo-saxon Earls of Northumbria, from whom both his patrimony and his claims to certain English lands are derived. He was one of the Competitors for the Crown of Scotland in 1290-92.
He was the son and heir of Patrick de Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar. (His father was the son of Patrick, 6th Earl of Dunbar, son of Patrick, 5th Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Patrick, 4th Earl of Dunbar by his wife Ada, natural daughter of King William the Lion.) Another of this family's claims to the kingship of Scotland was as the agnates of the House of Dunkeld, being (a) the closest agnate, and (b) a candidate based on tanistry of agnates of the house where the deceased Alexander III belonged to. They descend, in an allegedly legitimate unbroken male line, from a younger brother of King Duncan I of Scotland (Maldred allegedly also was a younger son of Princess Bethoc of Scotland.
During his time, the Earls of Dunbar became recognized as the Earl of March.
The Earls of March on the Scottish border were descended from Crinan, whose younger son Maldred married Algitha, daughter of Ughtred, earl of Northumberland, by Elgiva, daughter of the Saxon king Ethelred the Unready. Maldred’s son Cospatrick, or Gospatric, was made earl of Northumberland by William the Conqueror; but being soon afterwards deprived of this position he fled to Scotland, where Malcolm III, King of Scotland, welcomed him and granted him Dunbar and the adjoining lands - he is counted as the 1st Earl of Dunbar. His successors controlled the marches, but the title Earl of March was only assumed by the eighth Earl of Dunbar.
Patrick, the 8th Earl, was allegedly son of his father's marriage with Marjory de Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn, earl of Buchan, allegedly descended from King Donald III Bane.
The 8th Earl was succeeded by his son Patrick Dunbar, 9th Earl of Dunbar (1285-1369), who was married with the famous Black Agnes of Moray.
Another posting stated:
Patrick de Dunbar, 9th Earl of Dunbar and/or 2nd Earl of March (1285-1369) was a Scottish noble prominent during the reigns of the Bruce kings, Robert I and David II. The earldom, located in Lothian, and known interchangeably by names Dunbar and March (so-called Northumbrian or Scottish March), was one of successor fiefs of Northumbria, an Anglo-Saxon Kingdom and later Earldom. The Dunbar family descended from one branch of ancient Earls of Northumbria, specifically from a branch which also had Scottish royal blood. His father, the 8th Earl of Dunbar, who had obtained the recognition for the title Earl of March (thus being counted as the 1st Earl of March), was Edward I of England's lieutenant in Scotland, but also held a claim to the crown of Scotland, made in 1291, by his wife, Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, earl of Buchan, and/or by being descended from King Donald III Bane.
The name 'Dunbar', was derived from the family castle and estate, and became an hereditary surname with its adoption as a name by the 4th Earl.
After the Battle of Bannockburn, Patrick Dunbar gave sanctuary and quarter to the English King Edward II at the fortress of Dunbar Castle, on the east coast of Scotland between Edinburgh and Berwick, and managed to effect the king's escape by means of a fishing boat whereby the wayward monarch was transported back to England, against all that might be considered sacrosanct by the suffering Scots. His intentions remain unclear. In 1333, frustrated by English interests in his inheritance of the great castle, Dunbar had the original castle levelled to the ground. Later, Edward III of England compelled him to rebuild the fortress at his own expense, and, with a total disregard to the circumstance of his imposition upon the royal house of Scotland, not an unusual imposition by that tradition of English royalty, used it to barrack English troops. After four years, in 1338, the castle was returned to Patrick's possession to command. Patrick Dunbar, governor of Berwick Castle (title bestowed by Robert the Bruce) commanded the Scottish army at the fateful Battle of Durham in October 1346. "He escaped with considerable losses."
Patrick Dunbar is not as well remembered as his wife Agnes Dunbar, 4th Countess of Moray, also known as Black Agnes of Dunbar. He died just a few months after his wife.

Children of Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl and Marjory Comyn

Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl

(1285 - 11 November 1369)
     Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl was born in 1285 in Scotland. There is a theory that there was another Patrick between this on and his father, who died before 16 Jan 1323/4 and married Ermengarde de Soulis, and it is their son Patrick who died after 25 July 368 who married Agnes Randolph. He was the son of Patrick (IV) Dunbar 8th Earl and Marjory Comyn.
     John Ravilious wrote: The "Turnberry Band" of 1286 was an agreement between several Scots lords, Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster and Sir Thomas de Clare... Among the parties to the agreement of 20 September 1286 were Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, and his sons Patrick, John and Alexander [1]. On that date, we know that Earl Patrick was aged 72 or more [2], and his eldest son Patrick was aged 43 or more [3]. We would reasonably place his third (known) son Alexander as being most likely aged say 30 and 40 on that date: this would yield a range for his birthdate between say 1246 and 1256.
     'Patrike de Dunebarre', knight, serving with the army of King Edward I in Scotland fought at the Battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298 together with his father. His arms are recorded as ' Gules a lion rampant a bordure argent semy of cinquefoils of the field a label of three points azure' (Falkirk Roll H36[8]) [the label was a difference, as his father the Earl was then alive: his arms - Gules, a lion rampant - are noted in the roll as ' les armes le Counte patrike ']
He was a supporter of the English position in Scotland (opposed by his wife); received Edward II after his defeat at Bannockburn,
25 June 1314 - permitted his departure from Dunbar by ship (Barrow p. 330[9])

entered the peace of King Robert - *
Surety of the Arbroath Declaration, 6 April 1320 (Barrow pp. 424-8)
* this may actually have been his son
.
     Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl married Ermengarde de Soulis, daughter of William de Soulis and Ermengarde Durward, circa 1303. This Earl married, first, Ermigarda, who, in 1303, and also on 26 June 1304, being then pregnant, received a cask of new wine as a present from King Edward I. The Earl apparently had children by her.
     Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl married secondly Agnes Randolph circa 1320. John Ravilious on the Gen-Medieval mailing list wrote: His second wife, so far as is known, was Agnes, eldest daughter of Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray, sometime Regent of Scotland. They had a dispensation to marry, dated 18 August 1320, which states they were related in the fourth degree; but on 16 January 1323-24 they received a second dispensation narrating that they were really within the third and fourth degrees of consanguinity.
Meanwhile they had married, but they were permitted to remain in marriage, and their past and future children were declared legitimate. The Countess corresponded with her brother John, Earl of Moray, when he was a prisoner in England in 1337. After his death she and her sister shared his possessions betwixt them. Evidence of this is to be found in two charters, the first granted by Earl Patrick and Agnes, his wife, at Dunbar, on 2 January 1351-52, and the second by Sir Patrick Dunbar and Isabella, his wife, at Wester Spott, near Dunbar, on the same day, both writs confirming the same deed, a grant by their vassal Richard Anstruther, of the lands of West Pitcorthy, in Fife, to his sister Cecilia and John Strang, her husband. Other evidence will be noted in next memoir. Countess Agnes was still alive on 24 May 1367, but that appears to be the latest mention of her, and she may have predeceased her husband.
Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl and Agnes Randolph were given a Papal dispensation for their marriage on 18 August 1320. Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl and Agnes Randolph were given a Papal dispensation for their marriage on 16 January 1323/24.
     Earl of Moray from 1346 to 1367 Patrick de Dunbar, Earl of Dunbar, who suc. his father in 1308, m. Agnes, elder da. of Thomas (Randolph), lst Earl of Moray, and coh. of her brother, the 3rd Earl, but he had no claim to the Earldom, which was limited to the heirs male of the body of the grantee, nor to Annandale, which was granted with like limitation. In 1346, however, when the 3rd Earl of Moray was slain, King David was taken prisoner, and remained in exile in England until 1357. During that time the Earl and Countess of March and Dunbar found means to occupy the comitatus, except the customs of burghs, which were collected for the King, and to compel recognition from David after his return, as is evidenced by many official records. The King confirmed the Earl's appointment of a sheriff and constable of Elgin-an exercise of the regality of Moray and granted him an annuity during pleasure, in both cases as Earl of March and Moray. His possession appears to have been terminated only by the Act of Resumption in 1367; from 1368 the Exchequer Rolls show the comitatus in the hands of the Crown. [Cokayne]
His political sympathies were clearly shown by the assistance he gave to Edward II after the Battle of Bannockburn, for he received the conquered king into his castel at Dunbar, and helped him to escape by sea to his own country. Soon after, however, a change came over his views, and he, with his forces, joined the army of Robert Bruce, taking part in the siege of Berwick in 1318. Later on, he adhered to the cause of David II, the son and sucessor of Bruce, but in 1322 he was not unjustly suspected of favouring the calim of Edward Balliol to the Scottish crown. Fourteen years afterwards he took part in the disastrous expedition to England, which culminated in the defeat at Neville's Cross, but was able to lead back to Scotland, a portion of the army. He was regarded by his contemporaries as altogether loyal, even after he broke with Edward.
Patrick, ninth Earl of Dunbar and second or fourth of March, born, according to the inquest held after his succession, in 1282, and aged twenty four at his father's death. He had already taken part in public life, as he was present with his father at the siege of Carlaverock, when he was only sixteen. In 1307 he as well as his father were required by Edward II. to obey the Earl of Richmond, the English King's lieutenant, and to preserve the peace in Scotland. After his succession as Earl, he retained the goodwill of King Edward II., and towards the close of 1313 the Earl and Sir Adam of Gordon were conjoined as envoys from the 'people of Scotland' adhering to the English interest, to lay before King Edward their sufferings under the constant raids made by King Robert Bruce and his officers, who were gradually gaining the upper hand in the country. Earl Patrick's lands and tenants were specially exposed, not only to the forays of their own countrymen, but to attacks by the English garrisons of Berwick and Roxburgh, the commanders of which refused redress. The King gave an encouraging reply, and also made a formal promise that he would lead an army to their assistance about midsummer of the. following year, a promise which he fulfilled, resulting in the battle of Bannockburn. Earl Patrick received the English King, a fugitive, and sheltered him in his castle of Dunbar till he could make his way by sea to Berwick. The Earl after this became an adherent of King Robert Bruce, and in the beginning of 1318 he took an active part in obtaining the surrender of the town of Berwick, then besieged by Bruce, who, by the Earl's aid, gained possession of the town on 28 March 1318, though the castle held out till 20 July. The Earl's seal is attached to the letter by the Scottish nobles to Pope John XXII., on 6 April 1320, and he continued faithful to his own country, not only during the reign of King Robert, but through the troublous times which marked the minority of David II. When the battle of Dupplin was fought and the Regent Mar slain, on 12 August 1332, Earl Patrick was in command of a large body of troops encamped near Auchterarder. Hearing of the defeat of the Regent, the Earl marched towards Perth, whither Baliol had gone, and invested that town. But a fleet of ships upon which he depended for support having been broken up, he raised the siege. Later in the year, he and Archibald Douglas, now Regent, endeavoured to arrange a peace, but it was not held binding.
     The Earl was in command of the castle of Berwick-on-Tweed in July 1333, when the defeat of the Scots at Halidon Hill forced him to surrender the place to the English King. He received a grant of £100 of land to himself and Agnes, his wife, and for this, or bemuse he believed the Scottish cause hopeless, he again joined the English party, and was one of the obsequious Parliament in February 1334 who virtually gave up their country to the usurper. Other favours were bestowed on the Earl, and he received considerable sums of money. On one occasion he was, apparently when returning from a visit to Edward at York, attacked by 'file people' and 'sore hurt' for desire of the money he carried. In the following year, however, he again threw off his allegiance to England, and this time wholly, being probably inclined to this step by the invasion of Scotland at the close of 1334, when a force led by Edward III himself harried Lothian, and laid it waste, not sparing the Earl's lands.' King Edward immediately, declared the Earl's estates forfeited, and distributed those in Northumberland to various persons, while he also assumed the Berwickshire lands into his own hands. The Earl having taken his stand, entered into active hostilities and fought the English partisans wherever possible. The Earl's lands in East Lothian, Whittinghame and others, were all at this time in the hands of the English King, as appears, from the accounts, but he held to his Scottish allegiance, and took part in the operations of the patriotic army. He was ably seconded by his wife, Agnes Randolph, elder daughter of the famous Regent, who showed all the best abilities of her family in successfully defending her husband's castle of Dunbar against an English force. The siege began on 28 January and the castle was not relieved until about 10 June, when the English retired.' He commanded the left wing of the Scottish army at the battle of Durham on 17 October 1346. On 4 September 1351 his son and heir was one of the hostages for the return of King David II to England, he being then on parole in Scotland. The Earl's son was also named as a hostage in 1334, but not in the later list of 1357, in which year King David was finally released, the Earl himself being a party to the treaty of release. The truce made in 1354 was soon broken, Earl Patrick taking part in various attacks upon the English. In 1358 a casual reference is made in the Exchequer Rolls to the taking or capture of the Earl of March by Sir James Lindsay, but no further evidence of the incident has been found.
     In 1363 Earl Patrick joined the High Stewart and the Earl of Douglas in their outbreak of dissatisfaction with the extravagance of King David II. The Earl of March perhaps had other causes of grievance. The death, at the battle of Durham, of his brother-in-law, John Randolph, Earl of Moray, seems to have added a considerable accession of territory to his heiresses, who were his two sisters, Agnes, wife of Earl Patrick, and Isabella, wife of the Earl's cousin, Sir Patrick Dunbar. The earldom of Moray was a male fief and so fell into the hands of the Crown, as also apparently did Annandale, though it was then in English hands, but extensive lands in Dumfriesshire, Ayrshire, Aberdeenshire, and Fifeshire remained, and were divided between the two sisters. Some time after 1346 the Earl assumed the title of Moray, in addition to that of March, and he appears as Earl of March and Moray in Parliament, on 31 August 1358. Notwithstanding this, King David II granted the northern earldom in favour of the English Duke of Lancaster on 5 April 1358, but Earl Patrick continued to hold the double title, and in 1367 the rents of the earldom were stated by Parliament to be still in his hands. It may, however, have been some resentment against the King which led the Earl to take part in the rising of 1363, though he did not take a very active part, and it was quickly suppressed, the rebellious lords making separate submissions.
The Earl held the earldom of Dunbar for nearly sixty years, and though an aged man at his death, seems to have been vigorous to the end. He assisted at a treaty with England, begun at Morehouselaw on 1, and ended at Roxburgh 4, September 1367, and he appears to have personally taken order with the affairs of a vassal who died 8 February 1367-68. He was present at a Parliament at Stirling on 1368, but died apparently before the 25th of same month, or at least resigned his earldom about that date, and probably died not long after, aged eighty-six or more.

This Earl had several seals. First, about 1320, his seal shows a lion rampant within a bordure charged with twelve roses. Legend, "s. PATRICII DE DVNBAR COMITIS MAR." The next, in 1334, shows a lion rampant within a bordure charged with thirteen roses. Crest, On a barred helmet front face, a tower masoned and embattled, from which issues the half-length nude figure of a woman with flowing hair, holding in each hand a coronet. At each side of the tower is the head and fore part of a lion, one paw resting on the helmet. Supporters, Two hairy savages. Beneath the shield is a wyvern. Legend, 'SIGILLVM PATRICII COMITIS DE MARCHIA.
The third seal, in 1357, shows a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eleven roses. Crest, On a cylindrical helmet with capeline and coronet, a horse's head bridled. Supporters, Two men in doublets, each with a pointed cap and tall feather in front. Within an ornamented quatrefoil panel. Legend, 'S. PATRICII DE DVNB[AR] COMITIS [MARCHIE]."
The fourth, about 1367, shows an equestrian figure riding to sinister, with sword in right hand and shield on left arm bearing arms, which are repeated on his surcoat and the caparisons of his horse,- a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eleven roses. Crest, On his helmet, a horse head bridled. Legend, ' + SIGILLVM : PATRICII DE DVNBAR COMITIS . MARCHIE.' The counterseal is a shield, within a circle ornamented with six decorated cusps, bearing arms, -a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eleven roses. Legend, ' + SIGILLVM PATRICII : DE : DVNBAR COMITIS : MARCHIE. 9 2
Another seal is similar to the last, but the shield bears a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses. Fan plume on the helmet and also on the horse's head. Legend, 6 S. PATRICII DE DVMBAR COMITIS MARCHIE."
A fifth seal shows a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses. The seal of his wife Agnes Randolph shows four shields in a circle, point to point, with a three-pointed coronet between each two shields. One of the shields bears a lion rampant within a double tressure, two bear the arms of her husband, and the fourth bears the three cushions of Randolph, in a double tressure. Legend, 'S. AGNETIS COMITISSE DE DUNBAR ET MORAVIE."
. Patrick He was created Earl of March and Moray in right of his wife, resigning his Earldom of Dunbar/March to the Crown for regrant 25 July 1368 to his great-nephew and heir male George in 1357/58. Patrick was also known as the Earl of March. He resigned the Earldom of March and the barony of Cumnock in 1363, six years before his death. His titles passed to their nephew George, the son of Agnes' sister Geilis, who had married John, the brother of Patrick in 1363.
     John Ravilious wrote on Gen-Medieval mailing list: Charter of Patrick V of Dunbar, Earl of March and Moray, confirming that the monks of Coldingham are to hold Ederham and Nesbit free from all annual rent, as set out in the charter of Gospatric, Earl, brother of Dolfin [Misc.Ch. 778] and relaxing his claim for 10/-, one pair of boots and one skin garment.
Witnesses: Lord Patrick de Hepburn, Lord of Hales, George de Dunbar, the Earl's cousin, Alexander de Ramsey, Alexander de Rykklynton, constable of Dunbar, Robert Leche, steward, Richard de Ellam, & many others.
Confirmed with the assent of Agnes the countess.
At his castle of Dunbar 24 May 1367.
One would be inclined to see George Dunbar, if the Earl's heir, in 'first position' in the witness order of the foregoing charter. It is interesting that Patrick de Hepburn of Hailes is found there instead. This has been discussed on the list in the past, and short of an ongoing search for evidence to prove/disprove conjectures as to particular relationships, I find nothing further to add as yet. See the threads , and in the archives.

While resolution has yet to be achieved, that George Dunbar was descended from Patrick de Dunbar, Earl of March (d. 10 Oct 1308) and his wife Marjory Comyn appears certain, if not proven as yet. It does seem most likely (to J P Ravilous) that the last Earl Patrick (d. ca. 1368) was the elder grandson of the Dunbar-Comyn marriage; finding evidence to finally prove or disprove this would be significant
.
     Patrick, Earl of Dunbar (cousin of George according to many, great-uncle according to others) resigned the earldom to King David II, evidently in early 1368. George Dunbar then had a charter from King David II granting him the Earldom of March, dated at Stirling, 25 Jul 1368. This was a resignation and regrant with a special destination. This was a very common matter with Scottish peerages. Just because the mechanism used in these cases was a resignation and regrant does not mean that the title ceased to exist and that a new title was granted. Resignations and regrants were often also used to have a confirmation of the family in their lands. There would have been no purpose in the regrant to George, if he had been the heir in any case. There does not appear to have been a contest between George and the "true" heir, in the person of another Dunbar. However, if Sir Patrick Hepburn of Hailes did in fact marry the daughter and eventual heiress of Patrick Earl of Dunbar, then there was every reason why the Earl might have wanted the title to stay in the Dunbar family, rather than go to the Hepburns.
Of course later the Hepburns were a proud and prominent family, but the Hailes branch were junior to the Waughton branch - the article in SP does not unravel the relationship - and I suspect it would not have been seen as a "good" or at least good enough marriage at the time.
The Dunbars in later times were notable for always marrying off heiresses within the name, to consolidate their power block; this was of course the main reason for (partially) disinheriting heiresses, usually by a tailzie to heirs male.
     Patrick died on 11 November 1369 in Scotland. Burke's Extinct peerage claims that at the age of 84 he denuded himself of his title and died plain Sir Patrick de Dunbar, Kt. in 1369. Other sources state that he died circa July 1368.
     Patrick V, Earl of March (or Earl of Dunbar) (d. 1369) was a Scottish noble prominent during the reigns of the Bruce kings, Robert I and David II. The earldom, located in Lothian, and known interchangeably by names Dunbar and March (so-called Northumbrian or Scottish March), was one of successor fiefs of Northumbria, an Anglo-Saxon Kingdom and later Earldom. The Dunbar family descended from one branch of ancient Earls of Northumbria, specifically from a branch which also had Scottish royal blood. His father, the Patrick IV, Earl of March, who had obtained the recognition for the title Earl of March, was Edward I of England's lieutenant in Scotland, but also held a claim to the crown of Scotland, made in 1291, by his wife, Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan who was descended from King Donald III.
After the Battle of Bannockburn, Patrick Dunbar gave sanctuary and quarter to the English King Edward II at the fortress of Dunbar Castle, on the east coast of Scotland between Edinburgh and Berwick, and managed to effect the king's escape by means of a fishing boat whereby the wayward monarch was transported back to England, against all that might be considered sacrosanct by the suffering Scots. His intentions remain unclear. In 1333, frustrated by English interests in his inheritance of the great castle, Dunbar had the original castle levelled to the ground. Later, Edward III of England compelled him to rebuild the fortress at his own expense, and, with a total disregard to the circumstance of his imposition upon the royal house of Scotland, not an unusual imposition by that tradition of English royalty, used it to barrack English troops. After four years, in 1338, the castle was returned to Patrick's possession to command. Patrick Dunbar, governor of Berwick Castle (title bestowed by Robert the Bruce) commanded the Scottish army at the fateful Battle of Durham in October 1346. "He escaped with considerable losses."
Patrick Dunbar is not as well remembered as his second wife Agnes Dunbar, 4th Countess of Moray, also known as Black Agnes of Dunbar. He died just a few months after his wife.
     The numbering of the Earls is problematic.
Will Johnson of Gen-Medieval mailing list wrote: Patrick de Dunbar, 8th Earl of Dunbar (c. 1242-1308), became recognized as the Earl of the Scottish March, being lord of the fortress of Dunbar, dominating much of Lothian, and being the most important fiefholder in the border regions of Scotland against England. He descended from ancient Anglo-saxon Earls of Northumbria, from whom both his patrimony and his claims to certain English lands are derived. He was one of the Competitors for the Crown of Scotland in 1290-92.
He was the son and heir of Patrick de Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar. (His father was the son of Patrick, 6th Earl of Dunbar, son of Patrick, 5th Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Patrick, 4th Earl of Dunbar by his wife Ada, natural daughter of King William the Lion.) Another of this family's claims to the kingship of Scotland was as the agnates of the House of Dunkeld, being (a) the closest agnate, and (b) a candidate based on tanistry of agnates of the house where the deceased Alexander III belonged to. They descend, in an allegedly legitimate unbroken male line, from a younger brother of King Duncan I of Scotland (Maldred allegedly also was a younger son of Princess Bethoc of Scotland.
During his time, the Earls of Dunbar became recognized as the Earl of March.
The Earls of March on the Scottish border were descended from Crinan, whose younger son Maldred married Algitha, daughter of Ughtred, earl of Northumberland, by Elgiva, daughter of the Saxon king Ethelred the Unready. Maldred’s son Cospatrick, or Gospatric, was made earl of Northumberland by William the Conqueror; but being soon afterwards deprived of this position he fled to Scotland, where Malcolm III, King of Scotland, welcomed him and granted him Dunbar and the adjoining lands - he is counted as the 1st Earl of Dunbar. His successors controlled the marches, but the title Earl of March was only assumed by the eighth Earl of Dunbar.
Patrick, the 8th Earl, was allegedly son of his father's marriage with Marjory de Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn, earl of Buchan, allegedly descended from King Donald III Bane.
The 8th Earl was succeeded by his son Patrick Dunbar, 9th Earl of Dunbar (1285-1369), who was married with the famous Black Agnes of Moray.
Another posting stated:
Patrick de Dunbar, 9th Earl of Dunbar and/or 2nd Earl of March (1285-1369) was a Scottish noble prominent during the reigns of the Bruce kings, Robert I and David II. The earldom, located in Lothian, and known interchangeably by names Dunbar and March (so-called Northumbrian or Scottish March), was one of successor fiefs of Northumbria, an Anglo-Saxon Kingdom and later Earldom. The Dunbar family descended from one branch of ancient Earls of Northumbria, specifically from a branch which also had Scottish royal blood. His father, the 8th Earl of Dunbar, who had obtained the recognition for the title Earl of March (thus being counted as the 1st Earl of March), was Edward I of England's lieutenant in Scotland, but also held a claim to the crown of Scotland, made in 1291, by his wife, Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, earl of Buchan, and/or by being descended from King Donald III Bane.
The name 'Dunbar', was derived from the family castle and estate, and became an hereditary surname with its adoption as a name by the 4th Earl.
After the Battle of Bannockburn, Patrick Dunbar gave sanctuary and quarter to the English King Edward II at the fortress of Dunbar Castle, on the east coast of Scotland between Edinburgh and Berwick, and managed to effect the king's escape by means of a fishing boat whereby the wayward monarch was transported back to England, against all that might be considered sacrosanct by the suffering Scots. His intentions remain unclear. In 1333, frustrated by English interests in his inheritance of the great castle, Dunbar had the original castle levelled to the ground. Later, Edward III of England compelled him to rebuild the fortress at his own expense, and, with a total disregard to the circumstance of his imposition upon the royal house of Scotland, not an unusual imposition by that tradition of English royalty, used it to barrack English troops. After four years, in 1338, the castle was returned to Patrick's possession to command. Patrick Dunbar, governor of Berwick Castle (title bestowed by Robert the Bruce) commanded the Scottish army at the fateful Battle of Durham in October 1346. "He escaped with considerable losses."
Patrick Dunbar is not as well remembered as his wife Agnes Dunbar, 4th Countess of Moray, also known as Black Agnes of Dunbar. He died just a few months after his wife.

Children of Patrick (V) Dunbar 9th Earl and Ermengarde de Soulis

Sir Patrick Dunbar 3rd Baronet, of Northfield

(circa 1676 - 5 April 1763)
     Sir Patrick Dunbar 3rd Baronet, of Northfield was born circa 1676. He was the son of Sir Robert Dunbar 2nd Baronet of Northfield and Mary Sinclair.
     Sir Patrick Dunbar 3rd Baronet, of Northfield married secondly Catherine Brodie in 1722 in Scotland. Catherine was the daughter of Joseph Brodie of Mentoun. His first wife Catherine was the daughter of William Sinclair of Dunbeath.






     Patrick died on 5 April 1763. He was MP for Caithness 1727-34. He had two sons who predeceased him and two daughters. He was succeeded by his cousin Archibald of Thunderton.

Children of Sir Patrick Dunbar 3rd Baronet, of Northfield and Catherine Brodie

Child of Sir Patrick Dunbar 3rd Baronet, of Northfield

Patrick Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar

(circa 1152 - 31 December 1232)
     The People of Medieval Scotland website states: Patrick (I), son of Waltheof, earl of Lothian (d.1182) and his wife, Aelina (d.1179), was the fourth earl of Dunbar. He first appears about 1178 and upon his succession was the first to use 'earl of Dunbar' rather than 'of Lothian'; he also inherited the lordship of Beanley and other lands in Northumberland. In 1184, he married Ada (d.1200), daughter of King William I; after her death he married Christina, widow of William de Brus (d.1211/12). The chronicler Roger of Howden described him as 'custos of Berwick' and 'chief justiciar of the whole kingdom of the Scots'; he was probably justiciar of Lothian. He was present at York in 1221, when King Alexander II married Joan, daughter of King John I of England. With Ada, Patrick had four sons - Patrick (d.1248), William, Robert, Fergus - and at least two daughters. He died on 31 December 1232 and was buried at the nunnery of Eccles. A. McDonald, 'Patrick, fourth earl of Dunbar', ODNB; [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/50326]. Patrick Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar was born circa 1152. He was the son of Waldeve or Waltheof Dunbar and Aelina or Aline Unknown (Dunbar).
     Patrick Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar married Ada, of Scotland,, daughter of William the Lion, King of Scotland, in 1184. Earl Patrick was twice married; first, in 1184, to Ada, a natural daughter of King William the Lion. She was the foundress of a nunnery at St. Bothans, now Abbey St. Bathans; and died in 1200.
William the Lion bestowed on him in 1184, Ada, one of his natural daughters, in marriage.
     Patrick Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar married secondly Christina FitzAlan (Bruce) between 1215 and 1218 in Scotland. The Earl married, secondly, between 1215 and 1218, Christina, widow of William de Brus of Annandale.
Andrew B W MacEwen, noted Scots genealogist, published an article in The Genealogist in 2003 which resolved her parentage. In that article, Mr MacEwen identified Cristina as a daughter of Walter fitz Alan (d. 1177), the first Steward of Scotland of that family.
     The Earl is said to have founded a collegiate church at Dunbar in 1218.
     He was described as a brave warrior. He held the office of justiciary of Lothian and Keeper of Berwick. In 1218, Earl Patrick founded a monastery of Red friars in Dunbar.
Patrick, fifth Earl of Dunbar, but the first who describes himself by that title, though Fordun styles him Earl of Lothian, 'Comes Lodensis,' when relating his marriage, was born in 1152. He appears in charters by his father, and also as a granter before his father's death. His estates in England occupied a good deal of his attention, and he is named in 1187 as having deforced a vassal from his lands of Derecester, or Darnchester, in Berwickshire. The Earl attended King William to Lincoln when he met King John there, and paid the usual homage for his lands in England.
Earl Patrick appears to have been somewhat litigious, or at least fond of 'a gude-gaun plea,' as he kept the monks of Melrose in trouble for a good while over a dispute between them and him as to a point of, trespass on some pasturage alleged to belong to the monks. The Pope ultimately referred the matter to the arbitration of Bruce Douglas, Bishop of Moray, and after much delay it was finally settled to the satisfaction of both parties.
In 1221 the Earl accompanied King Alexander II to York, and was present at his marriage there to the Princess Johanna, sister of King Henry III. In 1222 Earl Patrick is said to have taken part in an attempt to settle the direction of a portion of the March between England and Scotland, which had come into dispute through a question as to boundary between the Canons of Carham and Bernard de Hawden, a neighbouring landowner. But though his name apparently figures in a document dealing with the subject, which has been ascribed to 13 October 1222, there is strong reason, from internal evidence, for assigning it to the same date in 1245, and it therefore belongs to the history of his son the sixth Earl.
Earl Patrick held the earldom for fifty years, and died in 1232. The monks of Melrose, forgetting the annoyance he had caused them, give a touching picture of his closing days. He gathered his family together, with kinsmen and neighbours, to celebrate the joyful Christmastide. Four days later he was seized with grievous illness, and sending for his friend and relative, Adam, de Harkarres, Abbot of Melrose, received from him the last rites, extreme unction, and the monastic habit. He bade farewell to all, and died on the last day of the year. He was buried in the church of St. Mary of Eccles, where his grandfather is said to have founded a nunnery.
This Earl had two seals. The first, round, 21 inches in diameter, showing a mounted Knight in chain mail, riding to sinister, holding a sword with an ornamented blade raised in his right hand. He wears a flat-topped helmet, and carries suspended round his neck a heater-shaped shield charged with a lion rampant. The saddle-cloth has a fringe of six tags at the bottom. Legend-'SIGILL. COMI . . . PATRIC . . . VMBAR.' The second seal is round, showing an equestrian figure similar to the above, the saddlecloth having eight pointed tags on the fringe. Legend - SIGILL. COMITIS PATRICII DE DVMBAR.
Earl Patrick had apparently other children, perhaps daughters, but their names are unknown. Fergus, son of the Earl, appears in a charter by Earl Patrick to the convent of Coldstream, but he occurs nowhere else, and it is doubtful if he were a son of an Earl of Dunbar.
     Patrick died on 31 December 1232 in Scotland. In 1231 being then very old, after taking farewell of his children, relations, and neighbours, who he invited to his castle of Dunbar during the festivities of Christmas for the purpose, he retired to a monastery, where he died the following year. He was buried in St Mary, Eccles, Berwickshire, Scotland.

Children of Patrick Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar and Ada, of Scotland,

Paul Dunbar

(before 1583 - )
     Paul Dunbar was born before 1583 in Mochrum, Wigtownshire, Scotland. He was the son of Sir John Dunbar.
     8 July 1583 : Action at the instance of William Campbell of Corrantray against Paul Dunbar, son natural to the deceased Sir John Dunbar of Mochrum, and John Dunbar now of Mochrum nevoy and nearest apparent heir to the said Sir John, and tutor and curator to the said Paul, touching the production of Resignation made to David McCulloch of Druchtage of the ... land of Clone or any part thereof in
the hands of the said Sir John his superior, and also the Charter precept and instrument of Sasine made and given by the said Sir John to the said Paul Dunbar. Continued till 22 Nov. next [v.96 f.113].

Penrose John Dunbar

(2 September 1827 - 14 April 1903)
     Penrose John Dunbar was born on 2 September 1827  in Dacca, Bengal Presidency, India (now Bangladesh). Penrose John, born at Mymensing Sept 2, son of John Dunbar Esq, Civil Service & of Anna Sophia his wife, was baptised at Dacca the 6 November 1828. He was the son of John Dunbar and Anna Sophia Hagar.
     Penrose died on 14 April 1903 aged 75. He married twice but left no issue..

Peter Dunbar

     Peter Dunbar was the son of Alexander Dunbar and Jane Burnett.
     Peter Dunbar was employed the East India Company.

Peter Dunbar

(circa 1827 - 12 February 1835)
     Peter Dunbar was born circa 1827. He was the son of Sir James Dunbar 1st Bart of Boath and Helen Coull.
     Peter died on 12 February 1835. He was buried at Auldearn, aged 8.

Philip O'Brien Dunbar

(1898 - 14 January 1931)
     Philip O'Brien Dunbar was born in 1898 in Euroa, Victoria. He was the son of John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar and Margaret Ann Green. Philip was a plumber in 1916.
     Philip served in the Army as a private soldier between 1916 and 1919. He stated on his enlistment that he was born at Euroa, Victoria and was 18 and 4/12 years of age. He enlisted at Hamilton, on 7 February 1916 and was allotted army number 2896 and the rank of private. He embarked at Melbourne with the 6th reinforcements, 29th Battalion for the Middle East per HMAT "Euripedes" on 4 April 1916. Disembarked at Alexandria on 8 May 1916, embarked at Alexandria on 6 June 1916, disembarked at Plymouth 16 June 1916. Proceeded overseas to France on 21 May 1917. Taken on strength of the 46th battalion on 16 June 1917. Wounded in action on 11 October 1917, admitted to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance that day. Transferred to number 7 Canadian General hospital on 12 October 1917. Evacuated to the Brook War Hospital at Woolwich on19 October 1917. Transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford on 7 December 1917. Transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade on 21 January 1918. Proceeded to France on 7 February 1918. Rejoined the 46th Battalion on 10 February 1918. Returned to England, sick, on 15 January 1919. Embarked for Australia per HT "Plassy" on 17 March 1919. Disembarked at Melbourne 30 April 1919, discharged at Melbourne on 14 June 1919. Issued with the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He nominated his father, Mr John Dunbar of Box Hill, Victoria as his next of kin on enlistment. He was 5' 6" tall and weighed 138 pounds.
     Philip and John were registered as Charles Killigrew Dunbar, blacksmith & Philip O'Brien Dunbar, mechanic at 24 Ellingworth Pde, Box Hill, Victoria, on the 1919 electoral roll.
     Philip O'Brien Dunbar married Agnes Tracey in 1920 in Victoria. He deserted his wife shortly after marriage. They had a milk bar at Balwyn, bought the business from Mrs Smith. He was sighted in Darwin in 1942.
     Philip died on 14 January 1931 in Katherine, Northern Territory, Australia.

Phoebe Dunbar

( - March 1853)
     Phoebe Dunbar married Edward Dunbar Dunbar, son of Sir Archibald Dunbar 6th Bart of Northfield and Helen Gordon Cumming, on 17 October 1848 in Forres, Moray, Scotland. Married on the 17th ultimo... Edward Dunbar, Esq, Captain, H M 22nd Regiment, third son of the late Sir Archibald Dunbar of Northfield, Bart, to Phoebe Dunbar of Seapark, youngest daughter of the late Duncan Dunbar, Esq of Limehouse, London,.
     Phoebe died in March 1853. Phoebe, sister & heir of John Dunbar,whose death at Poplar in March 1853 was noted in the Moray newspapers along with 2 children.
But she is more likley to have died 9 May 1899.

Children of Phoebe Dunbar and Edward Dunbar Dunbar

Rachel Dunbar

     Rachel Dunbar was the daughter of James Sutherland-Dunbar Bart of Hempriggs and Elizabeth Dunbar.
     Rachel Dunbar married James Sutherland (of Langwell).

Randolph John Edward Dunbar

(circa 1842 - 1862)
     Randolph John Edward Dunbar was born circa 1842 in Duffus, Moray, Scotland. He was the son of Sir Archibald Dunbar 7th Bart of Northfield and Sophia Orred.
     Randolph John Edward Dunbar and Charles Gordon-Cumming Dunbar 9th Bart of Northfield were recorded on the 1851 census in Tulloch Park, Forres, Moray, Scotland. They were boardersa ged 9 & 7.
     Randolph John Edward Dunbar appeared on the 1861 census in Rockbere House, 14 Leonard Place, Kensington, Middlesex. Randolph Dunbar, boarder, aged 19, student, born Moray.
     Randolph died in 1862 in Kingston, Kingston RD, Surrey, England.

Rebeckah Dunbar

(before 1711 - )
     See Annals of Elgin for more.. Rebeckah Dunbar was born before 1711. She was the daughter of Archibald Dunbar and Rebecca Adamson.