Mary Bruce

(25 December 1802 - )
     Mary Bruce was christened on 25 December 1802 in St Nicholas, Aberdeen, Scotland. John Bruce, manufacturer & his spouse Ann Elmslie had a daughter born named Mary, baptised by the Rev Mr Bryce, in presence of John Smith & Patrick Simpson. She was the daughter of John Bruce and Ann Emslie.
     Mary Bruce appeared on the 1841 census in the household of John Bruce and Ann Emslie in Burgh Muir, Inverurie.

Maud (Matilda) Bruce

(after 1302 - 20 July 1353)
     Maud (Matilda) Bruce was born after 1302. She was the daughter of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland and Elizabeth de Burgh.
Maud (Matilda) Bruce married Thomas Isaac after June 1342. They had two daughters, Janet & Katherine. He was of Formatine and Kintore, Aberdeenshire. .” At an unknown date, his wife, Maud, was granted half of the thanage of Formartine and Kintore, Aberdeenshire by her brother, David II, King of Scots.
     Maud died on 20 July 1353 in Aberdeen. She was buried at Dunfermline.

Maud or Matilda Bruce Countess of Ross

(say 1288 - )
     Maud or Matilda Bruce Countess of Ross was also known as Maud in records.
     Maud was buried in Fearn. She was born say 1288. She was the daughter of Robert de Bruce Earl of Carrick, 6th Lord of Annandale and Marjorie Carrick Countess of Carrick.
Maud or Matilda Bruce Countess of Ross married Hugh, Earl of Ross,, son of William, Earl of Ross, and Euphemia Barclay? Countess of Ross, in 1309 or 1323 in Scotland. Lady Matilda, married to Hugh, earl of Ross. With Maud, Aodh had six children. Four of them were daughters, including Euphemia de Ross. All received prestigious marriage partners (including to the Counts of Buchan and Moray, to Mormaer Maol Íosa IV, Earl of Strathearn and the future king Robert II.

Child of Maud or Matilda Bruce Countess of Ross and Hugh, Earl of Ross,

May Bruce

(before 1816 - )
     May Bruce was born before 1816. She was the daughter of John Bruce and Ann Emslie.
     May Bruce appeared on the 1841 census in the household of John Bruce and Ann Emslie in Burgh Muir, Inverurie.

Neil Bruce

(say 1284 - 1306)
     Neil Bruce was also known as Niall in records. Neil Bruce was also known as Nigel in records. He was born say 1284. He was the son of Robert de Bruce Earl of Carrick, 6th Lord of Annandale and Marjorie Carrick Countess of Carrick.
     Neil died in 1306. Niel, a young man of singular beauty, one of those who surrendered at Kildrummie castle to the earls of Lancaster and Hereford in 1306. He was tried by a special commission at Berwick, condemned, hanged and beheaded.

Nigel Bruce (of Carrick)

( - 17 October 1346?)
     Nigel Bruce (of Carrick) was the son of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland.
     Nigel died being slain in the battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346? In Durham, Durham, England.

Rachel Bruce

(19 March 1801 - )
     Rachel Bruce was christened on 19 March 1801 in St Nicholas, Aberdeen, Scotland. John Bruce, manufacturer & Ann Elmslie his wife had a daughter born named Rachel; baptised by the Rev John Bryce in presence of Baillie Murray and Mr Alexr Low, merchants both here. She was the daughter of John Bruce and Ann Emslie.

Sir Robert Bruce

( - 12 August 1332)
     Sir Robert Bruce was the son of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland.
     Robert died on 12 August 1332 in Dupplin, Perthshire, Scotland.

Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland

(11 July 1274 - 7 June 1329)
Robert the Bruce, King of Scots (1274-1329)
      Robert Bruce had a large family in addition to his wife Elizabeth and his children. There were his brothers, Edward, Alexander, Thomas and Niall, his sisters Christian, Isabel (Queen of Norway), Margaret, Matilda and Mary, and his nephews Donald, Earl of Mar and Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray. Alexander, Thomas and Niall were all executed by the English following capture, and Edward Bruce was killed in battle in Ireland.
In addition to his legitimate offspring, Robert Bruce had several illegitimate children by unknown mothers. His sons were Sir Robert (died 12 August 1332 at the Battle of Dupplin Moor), Walter, of Odistoun on the Clyde, predeceased his father, and Niall, of Carrick, (died 17 October 1346 at the Battle of Neville's Cross). His daughters were Elizabeth (married Walter Oliphant of Gask), Margaret (married Robert Glen), alive as of 29 February 1364, and Christian, of Carrick, who died after 1329, when she was in receipt of a pension. Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland was born on 11 July 1274 in Turnberry, Kirkoswald, Ayrshire, Scotland. He was the eldest of three brothers and seven sisters. Born at Turnberry Castle according to Scott. His earliest years were spent at the Castle at Turnbery, where his mother resided.
Burke gives the Feast of the Translation of St Benedict, being the 21 March 1274.
Lauder-frost gives Writtle, Essex as the birthplace. He was the son of Robert de Bruce Earl of Carrick, 6th Lord of Annandale and Marjorie Carrick Countess of Carrick. Robert held the title of Earl of Carrick between 1292 and 1314.
Earl of Carrick by the resignation of his father on 27 Oct 1292 [1294?] [when he refused to pay homage to Balliol] and Lord of Annandale. By the death of his father he may be held to have become Lord Bruce. He had livery of his father's lands 14 June 1304, having done homage to the English king. [Cokayne]. He had several illegitimate children.
     Robert (the) Bruce, king of Scotland. He submitted for a time to Edward I, but joined the patriots after the victory at Stirling. In 1299 a regency was appointed, Bruce and his rival Comyn being at the head of it. For several years Bruce kept up the appearance of loyalty to Edward; but in 1306 he murdered Comyn, and soon after was crowned king at Scone. He was defeated by an English army and fled to the isles, his queen and family being captured and imprisoned. The war was renewed in the following year, but Edward's death delayed the decision of the struggle. Bruce twice invaded England, took almost all the fortresses in Scotland, except Stirling, and in 1314 totally defeated Edward II. at Bannock-burn. Peace was made with England in 1328, and a few months later Bruce died.
.
Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland married Lady Isabella Mar, daughter of Donald, 6/10th Earl of Mar, and Ellen of Wales ferch Llywelyn the Great, in 1295 in Scotland.
Douglas Richardson wrote: In earlier posts on the soc.genealogy.medieval newsgroup, I presented evidence which proved conclusively that Robert de Brus, Earl of Carrick, lord of Annandale (afterwards King Robert [I] de Brus of Scotland) had a previously unknown second marriage by license dated 19 Sept. 1295 to Maud Fitz Alan, widow of Philip Burnell, Knt., of Holgate, Shropshire, and daughter of John Fitz Alan, of Clun and Oswestry, Shropshire. In 1296 Robert de Brus and Maud sued in a plea of dower regarding Maud's English lands. After this date, Maud disappears from Scottish records. I presume therefore that this marriage was terminated by divorce sometime before 1302 (date of Robert's next marriage) on grounds of consanguinity. The two parties were in fact near related to each other in the 4th degree of kindred, by virtue of their common descent from Sir William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke (died 1219). Maud Fitz Alan returned to England, where she and her son, Edward Burnell, were sued in Michaelmas term, 6 Edward II (1312-3) by Henry de Erdington regarding the manor of Wellington, Shropshire. She presented to the church of Great Cheverell, Wiltshire in 1314 and in 1315. Maud married (3rd) sometime before 19 June 1316 Simon de Criketot, who was living 7 March 1320.
In more recent times, I've learned that Maud petitioned the king and council in England in 1302 styled as "Maud, widow of Philip Burnell."
The petition involves certain socages and burgages held in various counties by her late husband, Philip Burnell [Reference: PRO Document, SC 8/313/E63]. Maud was living 19 June 1316, but evidently died sometime shortly before 17 Nov 1326 (death date of her nephew, Edmund de Arundel), as indicated by another petition dated c.1330 submitted
to the king and council by her daughter and son-in-law, Maud and John de Haudlo [Reference: PRO Document, SC 8/52/2570].
As for Maud Fitz Alan's third husband, Simon de Criketot, I find that in 1296, while with the king's army in Scotland, he was attached to answer Robert de Escores on a plea of trespass, regarding which plea he had licence to make an agreement, saving to the marshal his right; they submitted themselves to the arbitration of William Talemasch and
Thomas de Hauville [Reference: Neville "A Plea Roll of Edward I's Army in Scotland, 1296" in Miscellany of the Scottish Hist. Soc. 11 (1990)]. It is tempting to think that Simon de Criketot met Maud Fitz Alan in 1296, when he was in Scotland. If so, perhaps the grounds for Robert de Brus' divorce from Maud Fitz Alan was her abandonment and adultery, not consanguinity at all. Unfortunately for us, the records
of Scottish divorces in this time period have not survived.
For interest's sake, I've copied below an abstract of the petition dated c.1330, which concerns property Maud Fitz Alan received in
marriage from her brother, Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel. It should be noted that following the death of Maud's brother, Earl Richard Fitz Alan, the Fitz Alan family dropped the surname of Fitz Alan and subsequently went exclusively by the surname (de) Arundel. This explains why Maud's brother is called Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of
Arundel, in the petition below, whereas his son, Edmund, who was known as Edmund de Arundel, is merely called Edmund, Earl of Arundel.

PRO Document, SC 8/52/2570 (abstract of document available online at
http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk)
Petition dated c.1330 by John de Haudlo and Maud his wife to the king and council who state that Philip Burnell and Maud his wife were seised of certain tenements which were given in free marriage by Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel, Maud's brother; which tenements Maud leased to Edmund Earl of Arundel after Philip's death. Because they ought to descend to Maud de Haudlo, daughter of Maud and Philip, John and Maud brought a writ of formedon against Edmund after Maud's death, but Edmund died while it was being pleaded. The tenements came into the king's hand, and he gave them to Roger de Mortemer, formerly Earl of March. They are now again in the king's hand through his forfeiture, and John and Maud ask him to consider their right, and do justice to them.
Endorsement: The heir of the Earl of Arundel is restored to his lands, because of which they are to be at common law
.
Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland married secondly Elizabeth de Burgh in 1302 in Writtle, Essex, England. Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland was widowed in December 1302 on the death of his wife Lady Isabella Mar.
He seized the crown from John Balliol after a 9 year interregnum and was crowned King of Scotland (as Robert I) on 27 Mar 1306 when his Scottish dignitaries merged in that crown.
     Robert died of leprosy on 7 June 1329 in Cardross, Dunbartonshire, Scotland, aged 54. He was succeeded by David II, his son by his second marriage. He was buried in the Abbey church, Dunfermline. His body was buried in the centre of the choir in front of the High Altar of Dunfermline Abbey. His heart, in a lead csket, was taken to Melrose Abbey in 1331.

Child of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland and Lady Isabella Mar

Children of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland and Elizabeth de Burgh

Children of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland

Sarah Bruce

(27 March 1799 - )
     Sarah Bruce was christened on 27 March 1799 in St Nicholas, Aberdeen, Scotland. John Bruce, manufacturer & Ann Emslie his wife had a daughter born named Sarah, baptised by the Rev Mr Bryce in the presence of John Smith & John Thom, merchants here. She was the daughter of John Bruce and Ann Emslie.

Thomas Bruce

(say 1280 - 1307)
     Thomas Bruce was born say 1280. He was the son of Robert de Bruce Earl of Carrick, 6th Lord of Annandale and Marjorie Carrick Countess of Carrick.
Thomas and Alexander, who, being taken prisoners in Galloway, 9th February, 1306-7, by Duncan Macdowal, when bringing succours to their brother Robert from Ireland, after an engagement in which they were both severely wounded, and presented by him at Carlisle to Edward the First, were, by his order, immediately executed.
     Thomas died in 1307.

Valerie May Bruce

(circa 1932 - 28 August 1980)
     Valerie May Bruce was born circa 1932.
Valerie May Bruce married Charles Dudley Colbert, son of Charles William Colbert and Annie Minnie Louise Dudley. Their engagement was announed on 24 May 1951, stating he was the elder son of Mr & Mrs C W Colbert of Hunterston, via Yarram..
     Valerie died on 28 August 1980 in Moe, Victoria. She was buried on 1 September 1980 in Boolarra, Victoria. She was aged 48, wife of Charlie, mother of Suzanne & Graeme, m-i-l of Garry &.

Walter Bruce (of Odistoun on the Clyde)

( - before his father)
     Walter Bruce (of Odistoun on the Clyde) was the son of Robert, the Bruce, King of Scotland.
     Walter died before his father.

Ralph B Brunker

     Ralph B Brunker married Charlotte du Bourdieu, daughter of Saumarez du Bourdieu and Jane Carmichael, on 1 March 1852 in St Peter, Dublin, Ireland. He was a solicitor of 31 York St, she was of 4 Cheltenham Place.

Robert Brunning

(circa 1840 - )
     Robert Brunning was born circa 1840 in Suffolk.
Robert Brunning married Sarah Ann Bullett, daughter of Charles Bullett and Mary Ann Tweed, on 8 February 1862 in Honington, Suffolk.
     Robert Brunning and Sarah Ann Bullett were recorded on the 1871 census in Honington, Suffolk. Robert Brunning, 29, ag. lab., born Honington, his wife Sarah, 30, born Troston, father William, wdiower, 68?, born Honington, James, brother, unmarried 24, ag lab, born Honington, Arthur Brunning (sic), brother, unmarried 12, ag lab, born Troston.

Adam de Brus

( - circa 1080)
     Adam de Brus was born in France.
He was granted the barony of Skelton & Lordship of Cleveland in Yorkshire.

. He was the son of Sir Robert de Brus and Emma, of Brittany.
Adam de Brus married Emma Ramsay, daughter of Sir William Ramsay.
     Adam died circa 1080 in England.

Adam de Brus

( - 1172?)
      Lord of Cleveland. Of Skelton and Danby in Cleveland, co. York.
'Ada filio meo', witness to gift of father Robert of the manor of Appleton Wiske to St. Mary's, York ca. 1125-35 (EYC II: 1-2, cites Chartulary of St. Mary's)[3]. Adam de Brus was the son of Robert Brus.
He inherited his father's English estates and settled there.
J P Ravilious wrote: Death: 1143[3],[2] lord of Cleveland
of Skelton and Danby in Cleveland, co. York
Visitation of Yorkshire pedigree shows his death in 1167[5]
'Ada filio meo', witness to gift of father Robert of the manor of Appleton Wiske to St Mary's, York ca. 1125-35 (EYC II: 1-2, cites Chartulary of St Mary's).
Adam de Brus married Agnes Aumale, daughter of Stephen Aumale Count and Hawise de Mortimer, after 1151. She was subsequently married to William de Roumare II. Other sources suggest she married him first, but discussion on the medieval list supports a first marriage.
1154 - Henry II forced Adam De Brus to give up the 'Castle of Danby, with the Lordship and Forest thereto appertaining' in exchange for the vills of Collingham, Berdesey and Rington.
1163 - Adam de Brus paid £16 in lieu of knight service in the Welsh wars.
1167 - Death of Adam de Brus of Skelton Castle, 26 years after inheriting., He is buried in Guisborough Priory and was succeeded by his son also called Adam.
     Adam died in 1172? In England. Visitation of Yorkshire pedigree shows his death in 1167. John Ravilious gives 1143.

Children of Adam de Brus and Agnes Aumale

Margaret de Brus

( - 1307)
     Margaret de Brus was the daughter of Piers de Brus and Hawise de Lancaster.
Margaret de Brus married Robert de Ros, son of Robert de Ros Baron Ros of Werke. She was the 3rd sister and coheiress of her brother Piers de Brus, inheritance included barony of Kendal, Westmoreland divided between her son William and nephew Marmaduke de Thweng gave charter of the forest of Rydal and her share of Ambleside and Loughrigg, held of her by Sir Roger de Lancaster, illeg. brother of her mother.
Re: her claim as coheiress of the Earl of Aum[ale, see Blakely.
Father: Piers de Brus (-1240), of Skelton and Danby in Cleveland
Mother: Hawise de Lancaster, heiress of Kendal

Children: Robert (-<1310), William (-<1310), of Kendal.
     Margaret died in 1307.

Piers de Brus

( - 1240)
     Piers de Brus was the son of Piers Brus.
Piers de Brus married Hawise de Lancaster.
     Piers died in 1240.

Child of Piers de Brus and Hawise de Lancaster

Robert de Brus

(circa 1215 - 31 March 1295)
      Robert de Brus* Lord of Annandale [England] of Hartlepool, co. Durham, Writtle and Hatfield, Essex & c.[13] allegedly designated successor of Alexander II, c. 1251.
His son Richard de Brus had grant of the marriage and custody of the lands of Ralph de Tosny, 8 August 1265 * [probably as reward for support of King Henry III at Evesham and before - originally granted to Humphrey de Bohun and Edmund of Lancaster, 12 May 1264][13]
* order for William de St. Omer to delivery him to 'Richard' de Brus, 19 Sept 1265 [CP Vol. XII/I, Tony, p. 773 and note b, citing Cal. Patent Rolls and Close Rolls]. Robert de Brus was also known as Robert de Brus of Annandale 'the Competitor' in records. He bore arms: Or, a saltire & a chief gules. He was born circa 1215. He was of age in or before 1237. He was the son of Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale and Isabel, of Huntingdon.
Robert de Brus married Isabel de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare 3rd Earl of Gloucs & Hertford and Isabel Marshall or Pembroke?, on 12 May 1240.
On 9 August 1248 Robert de Brus confirmed the donation of the whole messuage of Cragyn, made by his mother Isabella, to Lindores Abbey. He was certainly born bef. 1227 as he was an adult when the above charter was confirmed.
A charter of King Alexander II granted to Norinus, son of Norman de Lesslyn, ' at the instance of Isabel de Brus and Robert de Brus her son ' (" ad instanciam Isobile de Bruiss et Roberti de Bruiss filii sui "), witnessed by William, earl of Mar, Alexander the son of Walter the Steward ["Alexandero filio Walteri Senescallo"], John Comyn and Nicholas de Soulis, dated at Edinburgh, 4 Dec 1248.
He was allegedly designated successor of Alexander II, c. 1251.
As Robertus de Brus, he was one of the Regents of Scotland and guardians of Alexander III, appointed 20 September 1255.
He was a supporter of King Henry III in England, April 1264 at Nottingham; fought at Battle of Lewes, 14 May 1264 (captured by de Montfort's forces) - ransomed by son Robert.
Robert de Brus married secondly Christian de Ireby on 3 May 1273 in Hoddam, Dumfriesshire. She was a neighbouring widow of Thomas de Lascelles & Adam de Jessmond. They had no issue.
' Robertus de Bruse, dominus vallis Anandaie', together with his sons Robert and Richard, entered into a bond with Patrick, earl of Dunbar, Walter, earl of Menteith and others at Turnberry, 20 Sept 1286 'to adhere to the party of Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster and Sir Thomas de Clare ' Red Book of Menteith II: 219-220, citing Historical Docs. Scotland, i:22.
'Brus dominus Vallis Anandie, Robertus de (Robert de Brus seignor du Val Danant).' - swore allegiance to King Edward I at Berwick, 1291.
In 1292, the market at Ireby, Cumberland was held by ' Robert de Brus, the elder, and Cristiana his wife,' the heir of the grantee [William de Ireby] under a charter granted by King Henry III, 29 Nov 1236 (QW, p. 24).
     Robert died on 31 March 1295 in Lochmaben Castle, Dumfriesshire, Scotland. He was buried on 17 April 1295 in Guisborough Priory, Yorkshire, England. He was buried beside his father.

Children of Robert de Brus and Isabel de Clare

Sir Robert de Brus

     Sir Robert de Brus was born in France.
Sir Robert de Brus married Emma, of Brittany,, daughter of Allan, Earl of Brittany,.

Child of Sir Robert de Brus and Emma, of Brittany,

Robert de Brus (3rd Lord of Annandale)

( - 1191)
     Robert de Brus (3rd Lord of Annandale) was the son of Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale and Euphemia de Aumale.
Lord of Annandale. of Hartlepool, co. Durham
Had a grant of a messuage in Hartlepool to the monks of Durham by father Robert de Brus witnessed by sons, 'Roberto, Willelmo et Bernardo filiis meis..' and others, ca. 1170-1190.
Robert de Brus (3rd Lord of Annandale) married Isabel Avenal of Scotland, daughter of William the Lion, King of Scotland, in 1183.
     Robert died in 1191 in Scotland. He died without issue. (1190?).

Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale

( - 1196)
     Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale was born in Scotland. He was the second son, known as le Meschin or the younger. He was the son of Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale and Agnes de Paganell.
'Robertus de Brus', grant of a messuage in Hartlepool to the monks of Durham witnessed by sons, 'Roberto, Willelmo et Bernardo filiis meis..' and others, ca. 1170-1190.
Grant of a messuage in Hartlepool to the monks of Durham by father Robert de Brus witnessed by sons, 'Roberto, Willelmo et Bernardo filiis meis..' and others, ca. 1170-1190.
He made a grant with wife Eufemia of the church of St. Hilda's Isle, Hartlepool, co. Durham to the canons of Guisborough, before 1176.
Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale married Euphemia de Aumale before 1176.
     Robert died in 1196 in Scotland.

Children of Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale and Euphemia de Aumale

Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale

(between 1185 and 1195 - before 23 January 1225/26)
      The name is derived from Bruis, now Brix, in the arrondisment of Valogbes.
Lord of Annandale, of Hartlepool, co. Durham. He was known as "The Noble". Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale was born between 1185 and 1195. He was the son of William de Brus and Christina FitzAlan (Bruce).
He had succeeded his father before 13 June 1213, on which date his younger brother (unnamed) was a hostage of the King of Scotland for him, and was then residing with his cousin Peter de Brus.
A similar letter to the following, written ' to Peter de Brus concerning the brother of Robert de Brus '
[unidentified] a hostage of the King of Scotland placed with Peter for safekeeping, to be transferred to the King of England's custody, 13 June 1213 :
' 574. Concerning the K. of Scotland's hostages. The K. to S[aher] earl of Winchester. Commands him on receipt, immediately to send the K. by good and safe messengers, Reginald his own son, and the son of William de Veteripont, hostages of the K. of Scotland, who are in his custody by the K.'s order; so that they may be with the K. at Portsmouth on the vigil of St. John Baptist instant.
On 26 Jun 1215, Philip de Ulecot was notified that K John had granted Robert de Brus, son and heir of William de Brus, a Wed market ( and a fair on f+2 Laurence (10 Aug) as it was set out in the charter (RLC, i, p. 217). On 11 Nov 1218, an agreement between Robert Brus and Patrick, earl of Dunbar and C. the countess, records that Patrick was to retain one third of the market.
On 11 Nov 1218, an agreement between Robert Brus and Patrick, earl of Dunbar and C. the countess, records that Patrick was to retain one third of the market (Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland, i, 1108-1272, p. 123, no. 700). '[9] [14]
~ The above agreement in 1218 was between Robert, his mother Cecilia and
her new husband Patrick, Earl of Dunbar.
Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale married Isabel, of Huntingdon,, daughter of David, of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (8) and Maud/Matilda, of Chester,, circa 1219.
     Robert died before 23 January 1225/26 in near Stilton, Huntingdonshire, England. He was buried in Saltre Abbey (Sawtrey), near Stilton, Huntingdonshire.

Child of Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale and Isabel, of Huntingdon,

Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale

( - May 1141)
     Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale married Agnes de Paganell, daughter of Foulk de Paganell. 'Agnes uxor Roberti de Brus' founder together with her husband of Middlesborough priory as a cell of Whitby abbey (DD 355, cites Dugdale, Mon. Anglicanum III:632, no. I)[8] cf. also EYC II:203, no. 858[3]. Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale was born in Scotland?. He was the second son (his elder brother inherited most of the English lands). He was the son of Robert Brus.
He was Lord of Cleveland.
John P Ravilious wrote: Death: 1142 [2],[3]
Occ: Lord of Cleveland and Annandale
of Skelton and Danby in Cleveland, co. York
had grant of Skelton from King Henry I, 1106[1] exchanged other lands for Danby in Cleveland, co. Yorks.
'Robertus de Brus', made gift of 20 carucates and 2 bovates of land, and the town of Guisborough, to the canons of Guisborough (confirmed by grandson Adam de Brus, before 1190[3]).
He attested a charter of William of Mortain before 1107, and charter of Henry I at a council in Nottingham, confirming gifts to the church of Durham, 1109.
Roberti de Brus, witness (together with Robert de Brus, Robert fitz Nigel, Hugh de Morville, Hugh 'bret' and Robert Corbet, Walter de Lindsay and Walter fitz Winemer) to charter of Earl David granting 100s. from Hardingestrona for the use of the church of Glasgow, with the concession of his wife Matilda; dated ca. 1123.
'Robert de Brus', had charter from King David I of Scots for 'Estrahanent [i.e., Annandale] and all the land from the boundary of Dunegal of Stranit [Nithsdale] to the boundary of Randolph Meschin.... Witnesses: Eustace Fitzjohn, Hugh de Morville, Alan de Perci, William de Somerville, Berengar Engaine, Randolph de Sules, William de Morville, Hervi son of Warin and Edmund the chamberlain', dated Scone, ca. 1124.
Robertus de Brus, made gift of 20 carucates and 2 bovates of land, and the town of Guisborough, to the canons of Guisborough (confirmed by grandson Adam de Brus, before 11902), 1124 or before.
'Robertus de Brus', made grant of the manor of Appleton Wieske ['vocatur Appletona'] and the land between it and Kirk Levington to St. Mary's, York, ca. 1125-35; witnessed by son Adam de Brus [EYC II:1-2, no. 648, citing Chartulary of St. Mary's][3]
cf. Richard Borthwick, 'Researching de Brus and Descendants' (cites Sanders, I J *English Baronies: a study of their origin and descent 1086-1327* (Oxford, 1963 [1960]) 77; DNB III:114; K S B Keats-Rohan, *Domesday People: A Prosopography of Persons occurring in English Documents, 1066-1166* (The Boydell Press: Woodbridge, 1999) I:414-415)[1].
Lord of Annandale on father's resignation (prior to Battle of the Standards), 1138
He renounced allegiance to Scotland and resigned lands to his younger son Robert before the Battle of the Standard, 1138.
     Robert died in May 1141.

Children of Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale and Agnes de Paganell

William de Brus

( - June 1212)
     William de Brus was the son of Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale and Euphemia de Aumale.
Lord of Annandale, of Hartlepool, co. Durham. Lord of Annandale [Scot]
'William de Brus', witness [with Bernard de Brus and others] to charter of Robert de Brus [called Robert II de Brus (more likely, the father of William] granted Elton, near Stockton, to William de Humetz, before 1184
[EYC II:4, no. 650 -note 3; cites Brit. Mus., Cott. ch. xviii, 50][3].
William de Bruce (Brus) was the second son of Robert (II) de Bruce (d.1194?) and his wife, Euphemia, niece of William, earl of Albemarle. He had two brothers, Robert (III) (d.a.1191), and Bernard, and one sister, Agatha. He married Christina, by whom he had two sons, Robert (IV) and perhaps William. He died on 16 July 1211 or 1212. In A.A.M. Duncan, 'Robert (II) de Brus, lord of Annandale', ODNB, viii, 373; [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/3749].
Grant of a messuage in Hartlepool to the monks of Durham by father Robert de Brus witnessed by sons, 'Roberto, Willelmo et Bernardo filiis meis..' and others, ca. 1170-1190.
William de Brus married Christina FitzAlan (Bruce), daughter of Walter FitzAlan and Eschyn de Molle of Huntlaw, before 1195 in Scotland. Her dower included a third of the manor of Hartlepool, co. Durham, as evidenced by agreement with her son and heir Robert de Brus: ' On 11 Nov 1218, an agreement between Robert Brus and Patrick, earl of Dunbar and C. the countess, records that Patrick was to retain one third of the market.
He had charters for a market and fair, granted 1201 by King John to William de Brus; William owed 20m. for having a market and a fair lasting three days ' (PR, 3 John, pp. 249-50).
     William died in June 1212 in Scotland. 16 June 1212 according to John Ravillious and 16 July 1212 via Wikipedia.

Children of William de Brus and Christina FitzAlan (Bruce)

Adam Brus

(circa 1134 - 1196)
      Adam de Brus of Skelton. Adam Brus was born circa 1134. He was the son of Adam de Brus and Agnes Aumale.
Adam Brus married Jueta de Arches circa 1170. Adam de Brus II was married to Ivetta, daughter of William de Arches, Lord of Thorpe Arches near Wetherby. They had five sons, Peter, Roger, Richard, Simon and Hugh and a daughter Isabel.
Leo van der Pas calles her Joanna de Meschines.
1170 - Adam de Brus II sat in the parliament of Henry II.
Adam de Brus made a gift of land to Guisborough Priory in the area between Guisborough and the present Commondale.
     Adam died in 1196. ?1188 Adam de Brus II died and was buried in Guisborough Priory, He was succeeded by his son, Peter.

Children of Adam Brus and Jueta de Arches

Agatha Brus

     Agatha Brus was born. Agatha or 'Agnes', identified by Rosie Bevan as daughter of Robert de Brus[26]
Parentage as stated by K.S.B. Keats-Rohan (DD 355)[8]

'de Brus, Agatha': "Daughter of Robert I de Brus, Wife of Ralph son of Ribald. Farrer, 'Early Yorkshire Charters' II, no. 650". This citation actually shows that Agatha was daughter of Robert II de Brus.' Henry Sutliff, SGM, 15 Sept 2002 (also FMG), cites DD 355[27]
~ but see discussion re: EYC II: 300-301[28] [holds she was daughter of Robert 'I' de Brus]. She was the daughter of Robert de Brus Lord of Annandale and Agnes de Paganell.
Agatha Brus married Ralph fitz Ribald. He was of Middleham in Richmondshire, co. Yorks. Son of Ribald of Brittany, lord of Middleham (-1121) & Beatrice Taillebois (-1112).

Child of Agatha Brus and Ralph fitz Ribald

Alicia or Aloysia Brus

     Alicia or Aloysia Brus was the daughter of Robert de Brus and Isabel de Clare.

Bernard Brus

( - before 1269)
     Bernard Brus was the son of Robert de Brus and Isabel de Clare.
'Bernard was given the manor of Connington, Hunts, by his father Robert de Brus "The Competitor." He died in 1266 and Conington was settled on his widow Constance who was holding it in 1276-86.'[25]

IPM, Barnard de Brus (53 Hen III)[24]

Spouse: Constance de Merston, daughter of Ralph de Merston.
     Bernard died before 1269.